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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [purchase]

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purchase

PUR'CHASE, v.t. [This word seems to be considered by Blackstone as formed from the L. perquisitio. This is an error. The word is from the root of chase; purchaser is to pursue to the end or object, and hence to obtain. In Law Latin, purchase, the noun, was written purchacium. The legal use of the word in obtaining writs, shows best its true origin; to purchase a writ, is to sue out a writ, that is, to seek it out; for sue, seek, and L. sequor, are all of one origin, and synonymous with chase.]

1. In its primary and legal sense, to gain, obtain or acquire by any means, except by descent or hereditary right.

2. In common usage, to buy; to obtain property by paying an equivalent in money. It differs from barter only in the circumstance, that in purchasing, the price or equivalent given or secured is money; in bartering,the equivalent is given in goods. We purchase lands or goods for ready money or on credit.

3. To obtain by an expense of labor, danger or other sacrifice; as, to purchase favor with flattery.

A world who would not purchase with a bruise?

4. To expiate or recompense by a fine or forfeit; as, to purchase out abuses with tears and prayer.

5. To sue out or procure, as a writ.

PUR'CHASE, v.i. In seaman's language, to draw in ; as, the capstern purchases apace, that is, it draws in the cable apace, it gains it.

PUR'CHASE, n.

1. In law, the act of obtaining or acquiring the title to lands and tenements by money, deed, gift or any means, except by descent; the acquisition of lands and tenements by a man's own act or agreement.

2. In law, the suing out and obtaining a writ.

3. In common usage, the acquisition of the title or property of any thing by rendering an equivalent in money.

It is foolish to lay out money in the purchase of repentance.

4. That which is purchased; any thing of which the property is obtained by giving an equivalent price in money.

The scrip was complete evidence of his right in the purchase.

5. That which is obtained by labor, danger, art, &c.

A beauty waning and distressed widow

Made prize and purchase of his wanton eye--

6. Formerly, robbery, and the thing stolen.

7. Any mechanical power or force applied to the raising or removing of heavy bodies.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [purchase]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

PUR'CHASE, v.t. [This word seems to be considered by Blackstone as formed from the L. perquisitio. This is an error. The word is from the root of chase; purchaser is to pursue to the end or object, and hence to obtain. In Law Latin, purchase, the noun, was written purchacium. The legal use of the word in obtaining writs, shows best its true origin; to purchase a writ, is to sue out a writ, that is, to seek it out; for sue, seek, and L. sequor, are all of one origin, and synonymous with chase.]

1. In its primary and legal sense, to gain, obtain or acquire by any means, except by descent or hereditary right.

2. In common usage, to buy; to obtain property by paying an equivalent in money. It differs from barter only in the circumstance, that in purchasing, the price or equivalent given or secured is money; in bartering,the equivalent is given in goods. We purchase lands or goods for ready money or on credit.

3. To obtain by an expense of labor, danger or other sacrifice; as, to purchase favor with flattery.

A world who would not purchase with a bruise?

4. To expiate or recompense by a fine or forfeit; as, to purchase out abuses with tears and prayer.

5. To sue out or procure, as a writ.

PUR'CHASE, v.i. In seaman's language, to draw in ; as, the capstern purchases apace, that is, it draws in the cable apace, it gains it.

PUR'CHASE, n.

1. In law, the act of obtaining or acquiring the title to lands and tenements by money, deed, gift or any means, except by descent; the acquisition of lands and tenements by a man's own act or agreement.

2. In law, the suing out and obtaining a writ.

3. In common usage, the acquisition of the title or property of any thing by rendering an equivalent in money.

It is foolish to lay out money in the purchase of repentance.

4. That which is purchased; any thing of which the property is obtained by giving an equivalent price in money.

The scrip was complete evidence of his right in the purchase.

5. That which is obtained by labor, danger, art, &c.

A beauty waning and distressed widow

Made prize and purchase of his wanton eye--

6. Formerly, robbery, and the thing stolen.

7. Any mechanical power or force applied to the raising or removing of heavy bodies.

PUR'CHASE, n. [Norm. Fr. pourchas or purchas.]

  1. In law, the act of obtaining or acquiring the title to lands and tenements by money, deed, gift or any means, except by descent; the acquisition of lands and tenements by a man's own act or agreement. – Littleton. Blackstone.
  2. In law, the suing out and obtaining a writ.
  3. In common usage, the acquisition of the title or property of any thing by rendering an equivalent in money. It is foolish to lay out money in the purchase of repentance. – Franklin.
  4. That which is purchased; any thing of which the property is obtained by giving an equivalent price in money. The scrip was complete evidence of his right in the purchase. – Wheaton.
  5. That which is obtained by labor, danger, art, &c. A beauty waning and distressed widow / Made prize and purchase of his wanton eye. – Shak.
  6. Formerly, robbery and the thing stolen. – Chaucer.
  7. Any mechanical hold, advantage, power or force applied to the raising or removing of heavy bodies.

PUR'CHASE, v.i.

In seamen's language, to draw in; as, the capstern purchases apace, that is, it draws in the cable apace, it gains it. – Encyc.


PUR'CHASE, v.t. [Fr. pourchasser, to seek, to pursue; pour and chasser, to chase, It. cacciare, Sp. cazar. This word seems to be considered by Blackstone as formed from the L. perquisitio. This is an error. The word is from the root of chase; pourchasser is to pursue to the end or object, and hence to obtain. In law Latin, purchase, the noun, was written purchacium. The legal use of the word in obtaining writs, shows best its true origin; to purchase a writ, is to sue out a writ, that is, to seek it out; for sue, seek, and L. sequor, are all of one origin, and synonymous with chase. See Blackstone, b. 3, ch. 18. Spellman ad voc.]

  1. In its primary and legal sense, to gain, obtain or acquire by any means, except by descent or hereditary right. – Blackstone.
  2. In common usage, to buy; to obtain property by paying an equivalent in money. It differs from barter only in the circumstance, that in purchasing, the price or equivalent given or secured is money; in bartering, the equivalent is given in goods. We purchase lands or goods for ready money or on credit.
  3. To obtain by an expense of labor, danger or other sacrifice; as, to purchase favor with flattery. A world who would not purchase with a bruise? – Milton.
  4. To expiate or recompense by a fine or forfeit; as, to purchase out abuses with tears and prayer. – Shak.
  5. To sue out or procure, as a writ.

Pur"chase
  1. To pursue and obtain; to acquire by seeking; to gain, obtain, or acquire.

    Chaucer.

    That loves the thing he can not purchase. Spenser.

    Your accent is Something finer than you could purchase in so removed a dwelling. Shak.

    His faults . . . hereditary
    Rather than purchased.
    Shak.

  2. To put forth effort to obtain anything; to strive; to exert one's self.

    [Obs.]

    Duke John of Brabant purchased greatly that the Earl of Flanders should have his daughter in marriage. Ld. Berners.

  3. The act of seeking, getting, or obtaining anything.

    [Obs.]

    I'll . . . get meat to have thee,
    Or lose my life in the purchase.
    Beau. *** Fl.

  4. To obtain by paying money or its equivalent; to buy for a price; as, to purchase land, or a house.

    The field which Abraham purchased of the sons of Heth. Gen. xxv. 10.

  5. To acquire wealth or property.

    [Obs.]

    Sure our lawyers
    Would not purchase half so fast.
    J. Webster.

  6. The act of seeking and acquiring property.
  7. To obtain by any outlay, as of labor, danger, or sacrifice, etc.; as, to purchase favor with flattery.

    One poor retiring minute . . .
    Would purchase thee a thousand thousand friends.
    Shak.

    A world who would not purchase with a bruise? Milton.

  8. The acquisition of title to, or properly in, anything for a price] buying for money or its equivalent.

    It is foolish to lay out money in the purchase of repentance. Franklin.

  9. To expiate by a fine or forfeit.

    [Obs.]

    Not tears nor prayers shall purchase out abuses. Shak.

  10. That which is obtained, got, or acquired, in any manner, honestly or dishonestly; property; possession; acquisition.

    Chaucer. B. Jonson.

    We met with little purchase upon this coast, except two small vessels of Golconda. De Foe.

    A beauty-waning and distressed widow . . .
    Made prize and purchase of his lustful eye.
    Shak.

  11. To acquire by any means except descent or inheritance.

    Blackstone. (b)
  12. That which is obtained for a price in money or its equivalent.

    "The scrip was complete evidence of his right in the purchase." Wheaton.
  13. To apply to (anything) a device for obtaining a mechanical advantage; to get a purchase upon, or apply a purchase to; as, to purchase a cannon.
  14. Any mechanical hold, or advantage, applied to the raising or removing of heavy bodies, as by a lever, a tackle, capstan, and the like; also, the apparatus, tackle, or device by which the advantage is gained.

    A politician, to do great things, looks for a power -- what our workmen call a purchase. Burke.

  15. Acquisition of lands or tenements by other means than descent or inheritance, namely, by one's own act or agreement.

    Blackstone.

    Purchase criminal, robbery. [Obs.] Spenser. -- Purchase money, the money paid, or contracted to be paid, for anything bought. Berkeley. -- Worth, or At, [so many] years' purchase, a phrase by which the value or cost of a thing is expressed in the length of time required for the income to amount to the purchasing price; as, he bought the estate at a twenty years' purchase. To say one's life is not worth a day's purchase in the same as saying one will not live a day, or is in imminent peril.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Purchase

PUR'CHASE, verb transitive [This word seems to be considered by Blackstone as formed from the Latin perquisitio. This is an error. The word is from the root of chase; purchaser is to pursue to the end or object, and hence to obtain. In Law Latin, purchase the noun, was written purchacium. The legal use of the word in obtaining writs, shows best its true origin; to purchase a writ, is to sue out a writ, that is, to seek it out; for sue, seek, and Latin sequor, are all of one origin, and synonymous with chase.]

1. In its primary and legal sense, to gain, obtain or acquire by any means, except by descent or hereditary right.

2. In common usage, to buy; to obtain property by paying an equivalent in money. It differs from barter only in the circumstance, that in purchasing, the price or equivalent given or secured is money; in bartering, the equivalent is given in goods. We purchase lands or goods for ready money or on credit.

3. To obtain by an expense of labor, danger or other sacrifice; as, to purchase favor with flattery.

A world who would not purchase with a bruise?

4. To expiate or recompense by a fine or forfeit; as, to purchase out abuses with tears and prayer.

5. To sue out or procure, as a writ.

PUR'CHASE, verb intransitive In seaman's language, to draw in ; as, the capstern purchases apace, that is, it draws in the cable apace, it gains it.

PUR'CHASE, noun

1. In law, the act of obtaining or acquiring the title to lands and tenements by money, deed, gift or any means, except by descent; the acquisition of lands and tenements by a man's own act or agreement.

2. In law, the suing out and obtaining a writ.

3. In common usage, the acquisition of the title or property of any thing by rendering an equivalent in money.

It is foolish to lay out money in the purchase of repentance.

4. That which is purchased; any thing of which the property is obtained by giving an equivalent price in money.

The scrip was complete evidence of his right in the purchase

5. That which is obtained by labor, danger, art, etc.

A beauty waning and distressed widow

Made prize and purchase of his wanton eye--

6. Formerly, robbery, and the thing stolen.

7. Any mechanical power or force applied to the raising or removing of heavy bodies.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

glut

GLUT, v.i. [L. glutio, Low L. gluto, a glutton.]

1. To swallow, or to swallow greedily; to gorge.

2. To cloy; to fill beyond sufficiency; to sate; to disgust; as, to glut the appetites.

3. To feast or delight even to satiety.

His faithful heart, a bloody sacrifice,

Torn from his breast, to glut the tyrant's eyes.

4. To fill or furnish beyond sufficiency; as, to glut the market.

5. To saturate.

GLUT, n. That which is swallowed.

1. Plenty even to loathing.

He shall find himself miserable, even in the very glut of his delights.

A glut of study and retirement.

2. More than enough; superabundance.

3. Any thing that fills or obstructs the passage.

4. A wooden wedge.

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