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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [proper]

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proper

PROP'ER, a. [L. proprius, supposed to be allied to prope, near.]

1. Peculiar; naturally or essentially belonging to a person or thing; not common. That is not proper, which is common to many. Every animal has his proper instincts and inclinations, appetites and habits. Every muscle and vessel of the body has its proper office. Every art has it proper rules. Creation is the proper work of an Almighty Being.

2. Particularly suited to. Every animal lives in his proper element.

3. One's own. It may be joined with any possessive pronoun; as our proper son.

Our proper conceptions.

Now learn the difference at your proper cost.

[Note. Own is often used in such phrases; "at your own proper cost." This is really tautological, but sanctioned by usage, and expressive of emphasis.]

4. Noting an individual; pertaining to one of a species, but not common to the whole; as a proper name. Dublin is the proper name of a city.

5. Fit; suitable; adapted; accommodated. A thin dress is not proper for clothing in a cold climate. Stimulants are proper remedies for debility. Gravity of manners is very proper for persons of advanced age.

In Athens, all was pleasure,mirth and play

All proper to the spring and sprightly May.

6. Correct; just; as a proper word; a proper expression.

7. Not figurative.

8. Well formed; handsome.

Moses was a proper child. Heb.11.

9. Tall; lusty; handsome with bulk. [Low and not used.]

10. In vulgar language, very; as proper good; proper sweet. [This is very improper, as well as vulgar.]

Proper receptacle, in botany, that which supports only a single flower or fructification; proper perianth or involucre, that which incloses only a single flower; proper flower or corol, one of the single florets or corollets in an aggregate or compound flower; proper nectary, separate form the petals and other parts of the flower.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [proper]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

PROP'ER, a. [L. proprius, supposed to be allied to prope, near.]

1. Peculiar; naturally or essentially belonging to a person or thing; not common. That is not proper, which is common to many. Every animal has his proper instincts and inclinations, appetites and habits. Every muscle and vessel of the body has its proper office. Every art has it proper rules. Creation is the proper work of an Almighty Being.

2. Particularly suited to. Every animal lives in his proper element.

3. One's own. It may be joined with any possessive pronoun; as our proper son.

Our proper conceptions.

Now learn the difference at your proper cost.

[Note. Own is often used in such phrases; "at your own proper cost." This is really tautological, but sanctioned by usage, and expressive of emphasis.]

4. Noting an individual; pertaining to one of a species, but not common to the whole; as a proper name. Dublin is the proper name of a city.

5. Fit; suitable; adapted; accommodated. A thin dress is not proper for clothing in a cold climate. Stimulants are proper remedies for debility. Gravity of manners is very proper for persons of advanced age.

In Athens, all was pleasure,mirth and play

All proper to the spring and sprightly May.

6. Correct; just; as a proper word; a proper expression.

7. Not figurative.

8. Well formed; handsome.

Moses was a proper child. Heb.11.

9. Tall; lusty; handsome with bulk. [Low and not used.]

10. In vulgar language, very; as proper good; proper sweet. [This is very improper, as well as vulgar.]

Proper receptacle, in botany, that which supports only a single flower or fructification; proper perianth or involucre, that which incloses only a single flower; proper flower or corol, one of the single florets or corollets in an aggregate or compound flower; proper nectary, separate form the petals and other parts of the flower.


PROP'ER, a. [Fr. propre; It. proprio or propio; Sp. propio; L. proprius, supposed to be allied to prope, near; W. priawd, proper, appropriate.]

  1. Peculiar; naturally or essentially belonging to a person or thing; not common. That is not proper, which is common to many. Every animal has his proper instincts and inclinations, appetites and habits. Every muscle and vessel of the body has its proper office. Every art has its proper rules. Creation is the proper work of an Almighty Being.
  2. Particularly suited to. Every animal lives in his proper element.
  3. One's own. It may be joined with any possessive pronoun; as, our proper son. – Shak. Our proper conceptions. – Glanville. Now learn the difference at your proper cost. – Dryden. Note. Own is often used in such phrases; “at your own proper cost.” This is really tautological, but sanctioned by usage, and expressive of emphasis.
  4. Noting an individual; pertaining to one of a species, but not common to the whole; as, a proper name. Dublin is the proper name of a city.
  5. Fit; suitable; adapted; accommodated. A thin dress is not proper for clothing in a cold climate. Stimulants are proper remedies for debility. Gravity of manners is very proper for persons of advanced age. In Athens, all was pleasure, mirth and play, / All proper to the spring and sprightly May. – Dryden.
  6. Correct; just; as, a proper word; a proper expression.
  7. Not figurative. – Burnet.
  8. Well formed; handsome. Moses was a proper child. – Heb. xi.
  9. Tall; lusty; handsome with bulk. [Low and not used.] – Shak.
  10. In vulgar language, very; as, proper good; proper sweet. [This is very improper, as well as vulgar.] Proper receptacle, in botany, that which supports only a single flower or fructification; proper perianth or involucre, that which incloses only a single flower; proper flower or corol, one of the single florets or corollets in an aggregate or compound flower; proper nectary, separate from the petals and other parts of the flower. – Martyn.

Prop"er
  1. Belonging to one; one's own; individual.

    "His proper good" [i. e., his own possessions]. Chaucer. "My proper son." Shak.

    Now learn the difference, at your proper cost,
    Betwixt true valor and an empty boast.
    Dryden.

  2. Properly; hence, to a great degree; very; as, proper good.

    [Colloq *** Vulgar]
  3. Belonging to the natural or essential constitution; peculiar; not common; particular; as, every animal has his proper instincts and appetites.

    Those high and peculiar attributes . . . which constitute our proper humanity. Coleridge.

  4. Befitting one's nature, qualities, etc.; suitable in all respect; appropriate; right; fit; decent; as, water is the proper element for fish; a proper dress.

    The proper study of mankind is man. Pope.

    In Athens all was pleasure, mirth, and play,
    All proper to the spring, and sprightly May.
    Dryden.

  5. Becoming in appearance; well formed; handsome.

    [Archaic] "Thou art a proper man." Chaucer.

    Moses . . . was hid three months of his parents, because they saw he was a proper child. Heb. xi. 23.

  6. Pertaining to one of a species, but not common to the whole; not appellative; -- opposed to common; as, a proper name; Dublin is the proper name of a city.
  7. Rightly so called; strictly considered; as, Greece proper; the garden proper.
  8. Represented in its natural color; -- said of any object used as a charge.

    In proper, individually; privately. [Obs.] Jer. Taylor. -- Proper flower or corolla (Bot.), one of the single florets, or corollets, in an aggregate or compound flower. -- Proper fraction (Arith.) a fraction in which the numerator is less than the denominator. -- Proper nectary (Bot.), a nectary separate from the petals and other parts of the flower. -- Proper noun (Gram.), a name belonging to an individual, by which it is distinguished from others of the same class; -- opposed to common noun; as, John, Boston, America. -- Proper perianth or involucre (Bot.), that which incloses only a single flower. -- Proper receptacle (Bot.), a receptacle which supports only a single flower or fructification.

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Proper

PROP'ER, adjective [Latin proprius, supposed to be allied to prope, near.]

1. Peculiar; naturally or essentially belonging to a person or thing; not common. That is not proper which is common to many. Every animal has his proper instincts and inclinations, appetites and habits. Every muscle and vessel of the body has its proper office. Every art has it proper rules. Creation is the proper work of an Almighty Being.

2. Particularly suited to. Every animal lives in his proper element.

3. One's own. It may be joined with any possessive pronoun; as our proper son.

Our proper conceptions.

Now learn the difference at your proper cost.

[Note. Own is often used in such phrases; 'at your own proper cost.' This is really tautological, but sanctioned by usage, and expressive of emphasis.]

4. Noting an individual; pertaining to one of a species, but not common to the whole; as a proper name. Dublin is the proper name of a city.

5. Fit; suitable; adapted; accommodated. A thin dress is not proper for clothing in a cold climate. Stimulants are proper remedies for debility. Gravity of manners is very proper for persons of advanced age.

In Athens, all was pleasure, mirth and play

All proper to the spring and sprightly May.

6. Correct; just; as a proper word; a proper expression.

7. Not figurative.

8. Well formed; handsome.

Moses was a proper child. Hebrews 11:23.

9. Tall; lusty; handsome with bulk. [Low and not used.]

10. In vulgar language, very; as proper good; proper sweet. [This is very improper, as well as vulgar.]

Proper receptacle, in botany, that which supports only a single flower or fructification; proper perianth or involucre, that which incloses only a single flower; proper flower or corol, one of the single florets or corollets in an aggregate or compound flower; proper nectary, separate form the petals and other parts of the flower.

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My 13 year old daughter has started to homeschool this year, and in the process realized the importance of word usuage and their definitions in that time.

— Nichiee (Pittsburg, KS)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

statute

STATUTE, [L., to set.]

1. An act of the legislature of a state that extends its binding force to all the citizens or subjects of that state, as distinguished from an act which extends only to an individual or company; an act of the legislature commanding or prohibiting something; a positive law. Statutes are distinguished from common law. The latter owes its binding force to the principles of justice, to long use and the consent of a nation. The former owe their binding force to a positive command or declaration of the supreme power. Statute is commonly applied to the acts of a legislative body consisting of representatives. In monarchies, the laws of the sovereign are called edicts, decrees, ordinances, rescripts, &c.

2. A special act of the supreme power, of a private nature, or intended to operate only on an individual or company.

3. The act of a corporation or of its founder, intended as a permanent rule or law; as the statutes of a university.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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