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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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present

PRES'ENT, a. s as z. [L. proesens; proe and sum, esse, to be.]

1. Being in a certain place; opposed to absent.

2. Being before the face or near; being in company. Inquire of some of the gentlemen present.

These things have I spoken unto you, being yet present with you. John 14.

3. Being now in view or under consideration. In the present instance, facts will not warrant the conclusion. The present question must be decided on different principles.

4. Now existing, or being at this time; not past or future; as the present session of congress. The court is in session at the present time. We say, a present good,the present year or age.

5. Ready at hand; quick in emergency; as present wit.

'Tis a high point of philosophy and virtue for a man to be present to himself.

6. Favorably attentive; not heedless; propitious.

Nor could I hope in any place but there

To find a god so present to my prayer.

7. Not absent of mind; not abstracted; attentive.

The present, an elliptical expression for the present time.

At present, elliptically for, at the present time.

Present tense, in grammar, the tense or form of a verb which expresses action or being in the present time, as I am writing; or something that exists at all times, as virtue is always to be preferred to vice; or it expresses habits or general truths, as plants spring from the earth; fishes swim; reptiles creep; birds fly; some animals subsist on herbage, others are carnivorous.

PRES'ENT, n. That which is presented or given; a gift; a donative; something given or offered to another gratuitously; a word of general application. Gen.32.

Presents' in the plural, is used in law for a deed of conveyance, a lease, letter of attorney or other writing; as in the phrase, "Know all men by these presents," that is, by the writing itself, per presentes. In this sense, it is rarely used in the singular.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [present]

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PRES'ENT, a. s as z. [L. proesens; proe and sum, esse, to be.]

1. Being in a certain place; opposed to absent.

2. Being before the face or near; being in company. Inquire of some of the gentlemen present.

These things have I spoken unto you, being yet present with you. John 14.

3. Being now in view or under consideration. In the present instance, facts will not warrant the conclusion. The present question must be decided on different principles.

4. Now existing, or being at this time; not past or future; as the present session of congress. The court is in session at the present time. We say, a present good,the present year or age.

5. Ready at hand; quick in emergency; as present wit.

'Tis a high point of philosophy and virtue for a man to be present to himself.

6. Favorably attentive; not heedless; propitious.

Nor could I hope in any place but there

To find a god so present to my prayer.

7. Not absent of mind; not abstracted; attentive.

The present, an elliptical expression for the present time.

At present, elliptically for, at the present time.

Present tense, in grammar, the tense or form of a verb which expresses action or being in the present time, as I am writing; or something that exists at all times, as virtue is always to be preferred to vice; or it expresses habits or general truths, as plants spring from the earth; fishes swim; reptiles creep; birds fly; some animals subsist on herbage, others are carnivorous.

PRES'ENT, n. That which is presented or given; a gift; a donative; something given or offered to another gratuitously; a word of general application. Gen.32.

Presents' in the plural, is used in law for a deed of conveyance, a lease, letter of attorney or other writing; as in the phrase, "Know all men by these presents," that is, by the writing itself, per presentes. In this sense, it is rarely used in the singular.


PRES'ENT, a. [s as z. Fr. present; L. præsens; præ and sum, esse, to be.]

  1. Being in a certain place; opposed to absent.
  2. Being before the face or near; being in company. Inquire of some of the gentlemen present. These things have I spoken to you, being yet present with you. – John xiv.
  3. Being now in view or under consideration. In the present instance, facts will not warrant the conclusion. The present question must be decided on different principles.
  4. Now existing, or being at this time; not past or future; as, the present session of congress. The court is in session at the present time. We say, a present good, the present year or age.
  5. Ready at hand; quick in emergency; as, present wit. 'Tis a high point of philosophy and virtue for a man to be present to himself. – L'Estrange.
  6. Favorably attentive; not heedless; propitious. Nor could I hope in any place but there / To find a god so present to my prayer. – Dryden.
  7. Not absent of mind; not abstracted; attentive. The present, an elliptical expression for the present time. – Milton. At present, elliptically, for, at the present time. Present tense, in grammar, the tense or form of a verb which expresses action or being in the present time, as, I am writing; or something that exists at all times, as virtue is always to be preferred to vice; or it expresses habits or, general truths, as plants spring from the earth; fishes swim; reptiles creep; birds fly; some animals subsist on herbage, others are carnivorous.

PRES'ENT, n. [Fr. id. See the Verb.]

That which is presented or given; a gift; a donative; something given or offered to another gratuitously; a word of general application. – Gen. xxxii. Presents, in the plural, is used in law for a deed of conveyance, a lease, letter of attorney or other writing; in the phrase, “Know all men by these presents,” that is, by the writing itself, per presentes. In this sense, it is rarely used in the singular.


PRE-SENT', v.t. [Low L. præsento; Fr. presenter; It. presentare; Sp. presentar; L. præsens; præ, before, and sum, esse, to be.]

  1. To set, place or introduce into the presence or before the face of a superior, as to present an envoy to the king; and with the reciprocal pronoun, to come into the presence of a superior. Now there was a day when the sons of God came to present themselves before the Lord. Job i.
  2. To exhibit to view or notice. The top of Mount Holyoke, in Hampshire county, in Massachusetts, presents one of the finest prospects in America.
  3. To offer to exhibit. O hear what to my mind first thoughts present. – Milton. He is ever ready to present to us the thoughts or observations of others. – Watts.
  4. To give; to offer gratuitously for reception. The first president of the American Bible Society, presented to that institution ten thousand dollars.
  5. To put into the hands of another in ceremony. So ladies in romance assist their knight, / Present the spear, and arm him for the fight. – Pope.
  6. To favor with a gift; as, we present a man with a suit of clothes. Formerly, the phrase was, to present a person. Octavia presented the poet, for his admirable elegy on her son Marcellus. – Dryden. [This use is obsolete.]
  7. To nominate to an ecclesiastical benefice; to offer to the bishop or ordinary as a candidate for institution. The patron of a church may present his clerk to a parsonage or vicarage; that is, may offer him to the bishop of the directives to be instituted. – Blackstone.
  8. To offer. He presented battle to the French navy, which was refused. – Hayward.
  9. To lay before a public body for consideration, as before a legislature, a court of judicature, a corporation, &c.; as, to present a memorial, petition, remonstrance or indictment.
  10. To lay before a court of judicature as an object of inquiry; to give notice officially of a crime or offense. It is the duty of grand juries to present all breaches of law within their knowledge. In America, grand juries present whatever they think to be public injuries, by notifying them to the public with their censure.
  11. To point a weapon, particularly some species of firearms; as, to present a musket to the breast of another; manual exercise, to present arms.
  12. To indict; a customary use of the word in the United States.

Pres"ent
  1. Being at hand, within reach or call, within certain contemplated limits; -- opposed to absent.

    These things have I spoken unto you, being yet present with you. John xiv. 25.

  2. Present time; the time being; time in progress now, or at the moment contemplated; as, at this present.

    Past and present, wound in one. Tennyson.

  3. To bring or introduce into the presence of some one, especially of a superior; to introduce formally; to offer for acquaintance; as, to present an envoy to the king; (with the reciprocal pronoun) to come into the presence of a superior.

    Now there was a day when the sons of God came to present themselves before the lord. Job i. 6

  4. To appear at the mouth of the uterus so as to be perceptible to the finger in vaginal examination; -- said of a part of an infant during labor.
  5. Anything presented or given; a gift; a donative; as, a Christmas present.

    Syn. -- Gift; donation; donative; benefaction. See Gift.

  6. The position of a soldier in presenting arms; as, to stand at present.
  7. Now existing, or in process; begun but not ended; now in view, or under consideration; being at this time; not past or future; as, the present session of Congress; the present state of affairs; the present instance.

    I'll bring thee to the present business Shak.

  8. Present letters or instrument, as a deed of conveyance, a lease, letter of attorney, or other writing; as in the phrase, " Know all men by these presents," that is, by the writing itself, " per has literas praesentes; " -- in this sense, rarely used in the singular.
  9. To exhibit or offer to view or notice; to lay before one's perception or cognizance; to set forth; to present a fine appearance.

    Lectorides's memory is ever . . . presenting him with the thoughts of other persons. I. Watts.

  10. Not delayed; immediate; instant; coincident.

    "A present recompense." "A present pardon." Shak.

    An ambassador . . . desires a present audience. Massinger.

  11. A present tense, or the form of the verb denoting the present tense.

    At present, at the present time; now. -- For the present, for the tine being; temporarily. -- In present, at once, without delay. [Obs.] "With them, in present, half his kingdom; the rest to follow at his death." Milton.

  12. To pass over, esp. in a ceremonious manner; to give in charge or possession; to deliver; to make over.

    So ladies in romance assist their knight,
    Present the spear, and arm him for the fight.
    Pope.

  13. Ready; quick in emergency; as a present wit.

    [R.]
  14. To make a gift of; to bestow; to give, generally in a formal or ceremonious manner; to grant; to confer.

    My last, least offering, I present thee now. Cowper.

  15. Favorably attentive; propitious.

    [Archaic]

    To find a god so present to my prayer. Dryden.

    Present tense (Gram.), the tense or form of a verb which expresses action or being in the present time; as, I am writing, I write, or I do write.

  16. Hence: To endow; to bestow a gift upon; to favor, as with a donation; also, to court by gifts.

    Octavia presented the poet for him admirable elegy on her son Marcellus. Dryden.

  17. To present; to personate.

    [Obs.] Shak.
  18. To nominate to an ecclesiastical benefice; to offer to the bishop or ordinary as a candidate for institution.

    The patron of a church may present his clerk to a parsonage or vicarage; that is, may offer him to the bishop of the diocese to be instituted. Blackstone.

    (b)

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Present

PRES'ENT, adjective s as z. [Latin proesens; proe and sum, esse, to be.]

1. Being in a certain place; opposed to absent.

2. Being before the face or near; being in company. Inquire of some of the gentlemen present

These things have I spoken unto you, being yet present with you. John 14:25.

3. Being now in view or under consideration. In the present instance, facts will not warrant the conclusion. The present question must be decided on different principles.

4. Now existing, or being at this time; not past or future; as the present session of congress. The court is in session at the present time. We say, a present good, the present year or age.

5. Ready at hand; quick in emergency; as present wit.

'Tis a high point of philosophy and virtue for a man to be present to himself.

6. Favorably attentive; not heedless; propitious.

Nor could I hope in any place but there

To find a god so present to my prayer.

7. Not absent of mind; not abstracted; attentive.

The present an elliptical expression for the present time.

At present elliptically for, at the present time.

Present tense, in grammar, the tense or form of a verb which expresses action or being in the present time, as I am writing; or something that exists at all times, as virtue is always to be preferred to vice; or it expresses habits or general truths, as plants spring from the earth; fishes swim; reptiles creep; birds fly; some animals subsist on herbage, others are carnivorous.

PRES'ENT, noun That which is presented or given; a gift; a donative; something given or offered to another gratuitously; a word of general application. Genesis 32:13.

Presents' in the plural, is used in law for a deed of conveyance, a lease, letter of attorney or other writing; as in the phrase, 'Know all men by these presents, ' that is, by the writing itself, per presentes. In this sense, it is rarely used in the singular.

PRESENT', verb transitive [Low Latin proesento; Latin proesens; proe, before, and sum, esse, to be.]

1. To set, place or introduce into the presence or before the face of a superior, as to present an envoy to the king; and with the reciprocal pronoun, to come into the presence of a superior.

Now there was a day when the sons of God came to present themselves before the Lord. Job 1:6.

2. To exhibit to view or notice. The top of Mount Holyoke, in Hampshire county, in Massachusetts, presents one of the finest prospects in America.

3. To offer; to exhibit.

O hear what to my mind first thoughts present

He is ever ready to present to us the thoughts or observations of others.

4. To give; to offer gratuitously for reception. The first President of the American Bible Society, presented to that institution ten thousand dollars.

5. To put into the hands of another in ceremony.

So ladies in romance assist their knight,

Present the spear, and arm him for the fight.

6. To favor with a gift; as, we present a man with a suit of clothes. Formerly the phrase was, to present a person.

Octavia presented the poet, for his admirable elegy on her son Marcellus.

[This use is obsolete.]

7. To nominate to an ecclesiastical benefice; to offer to the bishop or ordinary as a candidate for institution.

The patron of a church may present his clerk to a parsonage or vicarage; that is, may offer him to the bishop of the diocese to be instituted.

8. To offer.

He--presented battle to the French navy, which was refused.

9. To lay before a public body for consideration, as before a legislature, a court of judicature, a corporation, etc.; as, to present a memorial, petition, remonstrance or indictment.

10. To lay before a court of judicature as an object of inquiry; to give notice officially of a crime or offense. It is the duty of grand juries to present all breaches of law within their knowledge. In America, grand juries present whatever they think to be public injuries, by notifying them to the public with their censure.

11. To point a weapon, particularly some species of fire-arms; as, to present a musket to the breast of another; in manual exercise, to present arms.

12. To indict; a customary use of the word in the United Stats.

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Word of the Day

may

MAY, n. [L. Maius.]

1. The fifth month of the year, beginning with January, but the third, beginning with March, as was the ancient practice of the Romans.

2. A young woman.

3. The early part of life.

His May of youth and bloom of lustihood.

MAY, v.i. To gather flowers in May-morning.

MAY, verb aux; pret.might.

1. To be possible. We say, a thing may be, or may not be; an event may happen; a thing may be done, if means are not wanting.

2. To have physical power; to be able.

Make the most of life you may.

3. To have moral power; to have liberty, leave, license or permission; to be permitted; to be allowed. A man may do what the laws permit. He may do what is not against decency, propriety or good manners. We may not violate the laws, or the rules of good breeding. I told the servant he might be absent.

Thou mayest be no longer steward. Luke 16.

4. It is used in prayer and petitions to express desire. O may we never experience the evils we dread. So also in expressions of good will. May you live happily, and be a blessing to your country. It was formerly used for can, and its radical sense is the same.

May be, it may be, are expressions equivalent to perhaps, by chance, peradventure, that is, it is possible to be.

Random Word

wresting

WRESTING, ppr. Pulling with a twist; distorting; perverting.

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