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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [pole]

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pole

POLE, n. [L. palus. See Pale.]

1. A long slender piece of wood, or the stem of a small tree deprived of its branches. Thus seamen use poles for setting or driving boats in shallow water; the stems of small trees are used for hoops and called hoop-poles; the stems of small, but tall straight trees, are used as poles for supporting the scaffolding in building.

2. A rod; a perch; a measure of length of five yards and a half.

[In New England, rod is generally used.]

3. An instrument for measuring.

Bare poles. A ship is under bare poles, when her sails are all furled.

POLE, n. [L. polus; Gr. to turn.]

1. In astronomy, one of the extremities of the axis on which the sphere revolves. These two points are called the poles of the world.

2. In spherics, a point equally distant from every part of the circumference of a great circle of the sphere; or it is a point 90 deg. distant from the plane of a circle, and in a line passing perpendicularly through the center, called the axis. Thus the zenith and nadir are the poles of the horizon.

3. In geography, the extremity of the earth's axis, or one of the points on the surface of our globe through which the axis passes.

4. The star which is vertical to the pole of the earth; the pole-star.

Poles of the ecliptic, are two points on the surface of the sphere, 23 deg. 30' distant from the poles of the world.

Magnetic poles, two points in a lodestone, corresponding to the poles of the world; the one pointing to the north, the other to the south.

POLE, n. [from Poland.] A native of Poland.

POLE, v.t. To furnish with poles for support; as, to pole beans.

1. To bear or convey on poles; as, to pole hay into a barn.

2. To impel by poles, as a boat; to push forward by the use of poles.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [pole]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

POLE, n. [L. palus. See Pale.]

1. A long slender piece of wood, or the stem of a small tree deprived of its branches. Thus seamen use poles for setting or driving boats in shallow water; the stems of small trees are used for hoops and called hoop-poles; the stems of small, but tall straight trees, are used as poles for supporting the scaffolding in building.

2. A rod; a perch; a measure of length of five yards and a half.

[In New England, rod is generally used.]

3. An instrument for measuring.

Bare poles. A ship is under bare poles, when her sails are all furled.

POLE, n. [L. polus; Gr. to turn.]

1. In astronomy, one of the extremities of the axis on which the sphere revolves. These two points are called the poles of the world.

2. In spherics, a point equally distant from every part of the circumference of a great circle of the sphere; or it is a point 90 deg. distant from the plane of a circle, and in a line passing perpendicularly through the center, called the axis. Thus the zenith and nadir are the poles of the horizon.

3. In geography, the extremity of the earth's axis, or one of the points on the surface of our globe through which the axis passes.

4. The star which is vertical to the pole of the earth; the pole-star.

Poles of the ecliptic, are two points on the surface of the sphere, 23 deg. 30' distant from the poles of the world.

Magnetic poles, two points in a lodestone, corresponding to the poles of the world; the one pointing to the north, the other to the south.

POLE, n. [from Poland.] A native of Poland.

POLE, v.t. To furnish with poles for support; as, to pole beans.

1. To bear or convey on poles; as, to pole hay into a barn.

2. To impel by poles, as a boat; to push forward by the use of poles.

POLE, n.1 [Sax. pol, pal; G. pfahl; D. paal; Sw. påle; Dan. pæl; W. pawl; L. palus. See Pale.]

  1. A long slender piece of wood, or the stem of a small tree deprived of its branches. Thus seamen use poles for setting or driving boats in shallow water; the stems of small trees are used for hoops and called hoop-poles; the sterns of small, but tall straight trees, are used as poles for supporting the scaffolding in building.
  2. A rod; a perch; a measure of length of five yards and a half. [In New England, rod is generally used.]
  3. An instrument for measuring. – Bacon. Bare poles. A ship is under bare poles, when her sails are all furled. – Mar. Dict.

POLE, n.2 [Fr. pole; It. and Sp. polo; G. Dan. and Sw. pol; D. pool; L. polus; Gr. πολος, from πολεω, to turn.]

  1. In astronomy, one of the extremities of the axis on which the sphere revolves. These two points are called the poles of the world.
  2. In spherics, a point equally distant from every part of the circumference of a great circle of the sphere; or it is a point 90º distant from the plane of a circle, and in a line passing perpendicularly through the center, called the axis. Thus the zenith and nadir are the poles of the horizon.
  3. In geography, the extremity of the earth's axis, or one of the points on the surface of our globe through which the axis passes.
  4. The star which is vertical to the pole of the earth; the pole-star. Poles of the ecliptic, are two points on the surface of the sphere, 23º 30' distant from the poles of the world. Magnetic poles, two points in a lodestone corresponding to the poles of the world; the one pointing to the north, the other to the south.

POLE, n.3 [from Poland.]

A native of Poland.


POLE, v.t.

  1. To furnish with poles for support; as, to pole beans.
  2. To bear or convey on poles; as, to pole hay into a barn.
  3. To impel by poles, as a boat; to push forward by the use of poles.

Pole
  1. A native or inhabitant of Poland] a Polander.
  2. A long, slender piece of wood; a tall, slender piece of timber; the stem of a small tree whose branches have been removed; as, specifically: (a) A carriage pole, a wooden bar extending from the front axle of a carriage between the wheel horses, by which the carriage is guided and held back. (b) A flag pole, a pole on which a flag is supported. (c) A Maypole. See Maypole. (d) A barber's pole, a pole painted in stripes, used as a sign by barbers and hairdressers. (e) A pole on which climbing beans, hops, or other vines, are trained.
  3. To furnish with poles for support] as, to pole beans or hops.
  4. Either extremity of an axis of a sphere; especially, one of the extremities of the earth's axis; as, the north pole.
  5. A measuring stick; also, a measure of length equal to 5(?) yards, or a square measure equal to 30(?) square yards; a rod; a perch.

    Bacon.

    Pole bean (Bot.), any kind of bean which is customarily trained on poles, as the scarlet runner or the Lima bean. -- Pole flounder (Zoöl.), a large deep-water flounder (Glyptocephalus cynoglossus), native of the northern coasts of Europe and America, and much esteemed as a food fish; -- called also craig flounder, and pole fluke. -- Pole lathe, a simple form of lathe, or a substitute for a lathe, in which the work is turned by means of a cord passing around it, one end being fastened to the treadle, and the other to an elastic pole above. -- Pole mast (Naut.), a mast formed from a single piece or from a single tree. -- Pole of a lens (Opt.), the point where the principal axis meets the surface. -- Pole plate (Arch.), a horizontal timber resting on the tiebeams of a roof and receiving the ends of the rafters. It differs from the plate in not resting on the wall.

  6. To convey on poles; as, to pole hay into a barn.
  7. A point upon the surface of a sphere equally distant from every part of the circumference of a great circle; or the point in which a diameter of the sphere perpendicular to the plane of such circle meets the surface. Such a point is called the pole of that circle; as, the pole of the horizon; the pole of the ecliptic; the pole of a given meridian.
  8. To impel by a pole or poles, as a boat.
  9. One of the opposite or contrasted parts or directions in which a polar force is manifested; a point of maximum intensity of a force which has two such points, or which has polarity; as, the poles of a magnet; the north pole of a needle.
  10. To stir, as molten glass, with a pole.
  11. The firmament; the sky.

    [Poetic]

    Shoots against the dusky pole. Milton.

  12. See Polarity, and Polar, n.

    Magnetic pole. See under Magnetic. -- Poles of the earth, or Terrestrial poles (Geog.), the two opposite points on the earth's surface through which its axis passes. -- Poles of the heavens, or Celestial poles, the two opposite points in the celestial sphere which coincide with the earth's axis produced, and about which the heavens appear to revolve.

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pole

POLE, n. [L. palus. See Pale.]

1. A long slender piece of wood, or the stem of a small tree deprived of its branches. Thus seamen use poles for setting or driving boats in shallow water; the stems of small trees are used for hoops and called hoop-poles; the stems of small, but tall straight trees, are used as poles for supporting the scaffolding in building.

2. A rod; a perch; a measure of length of five yards and a half.

[In New England, rod is generally used.]

3. An instrument for measuring.

Bare poles. A ship is under bare poles, when her sails are all furled.

POLE, n. [L. polus; Gr. to turn.]

1. In astronomy, one of the extremities of the axis on which the sphere revolves. These two points are called the poles of the world.

2. In spherics, a point equally distant from every part of the circumference of a great circle of the sphere; or it is a point 90 deg. distant from the plane of a circle, and in a line passing perpendicularly through the center, called the axis. Thus the zenith and nadir are the poles of the horizon.

3. In geography, the extremity of the earth's axis, or one of the points on the surface of our globe through which the axis passes.

4. The star which is vertical to the pole of the earth; the pole-star.

Poles of the ecliptic, are two points on the surface of the sphere, 23 deg. 30' distant from the poles of the world.

Magnetic poles, two points in a lodestone, corresponding to the poles of the world; the one pointing to the north, the other to the south.

POLE, n. [from Poland.] A native of Poland.

POLE, v.t. To furnish with poles for support; as, to pole beans.

1. To bear or convey on poles; as, to pole hay into a barn.

2. To impel by poles, as a boat; to push forward by the use of poles.

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I'm Christian and the original meanings of words from the Christian perspective is important to me.

— Libby (Charlotte, MI)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

tetrasyllabical

TETRASYLLAB'ICAL, a. Consisting of four syllables.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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