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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [plunge]

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plunge

PLUNGE, v.t.

1. To thrust into water or other fluid substance, or into any substance that is penetrable; to immerse in a fluid; to drive into flesh, mire or earth, &c.; as, to plunge the body in water; to plunge the arm into fire or flame; to plunge a dagger into the breast.

2. To thrust or drive into any state in which the thing is considered as enveloped or surrounded; as, to plunge one's self into difficulties or distress; to plunge a nation into war.

3. To baptize by immersion.

PLUNGE, v.i. To pitch; to thrust or drive one's self into water or a fluid; to dive or to rush in. He plunged into the river.

The troops plunged into the stream.

His courser plung'd,

And threw him off; the waves whelm'd over him.

1. To fall or rush into distress or any state or circumstances in which the person or thing is enveloped, inclosed or overwhelmed; as, to plunge into a gulf; to plunge into debt or embarrassments; to plunge into war; a body of cavalry plunged into the midst of the enemy.

2. To pitch or throw one's self headlong.

PLUNGE, n. The act of thrusting into water or any penetrable substance.

1. Difficulty; strait; distress; a state of being surrounded or overwhelmed with difficulties.

People when put to a plunge, cry out to heaven for help.

And wilt thou not reach out a friendly arm,

To raise me from amidst this plunge of sorrow?

[In this sense, the word is now little used.]



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [plunge]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

PLUNGE, v.t.

1. To thrust into water or other fluid substance, or into any substance that is penetrable; to immerse in a fluid; to drive into flesh, mire or earth, &c.; as, to plunge the body in water; to plunge the arm into fire or flame; to plunge a dagger into the breast.

2. To thrust or drive into any state in which the thing is considered as enveloped or surrounded; as, to plunge one's self into difficulties or distress; to plunge a nation into war.

3. To baptize by immersion.

PLUNGE, v.i. To pitch; to thrust or drive one's self into water or a fluid; to dive or to rush in. He plunged into the river.

The troops plunged into the stream.

His courser plung'd,

And threw him off; the waves whelm'd over him.

1. To fall or rush into distress or any state or circumstances in which the person or thing is enveloped, inclosed or overwhelmed; as, to plunge into a gulf; to plunge into debt or embarrassments; to plunge into war; a body of cavalry plunged into the midst of the enemy.

2. To pitch or throw one's self headlong.

PLUNGE, n. The act of thrusting into water or any penetrable substance.

1. Difficulty; strait; distress; a state of being surrounded or overwhelmed with difficulties.

People when put to a plunge, cry out to heaven for help.

And wilt thou not reach out a friendly arm,

To raise me from amidst this plunge of sorrow?

[In this sense, the word is now little used.]

PLUNGE, n.

  1. The act of thrusting into water or any penetrable substance.
  2. Difficulty; strait; distress; a state of being surrounded or overwhelmed with difficulties. People when put to a plunge, cry out to heaven for help. – L'Estrange. And will thou not reach out a friendly arm, / To raise me from amidst this plunge of sorrow! – Addison. [In this sense, the word is now little used.]

PLUNGE, v.i.

  1. To pitch; to thrust or drive one's self into water or a fluid; to dive or to rush in. He plunged into the river. The troops plunged into the stream. His courser plung'd, / And threw him off; the waves whelm'd over him. – Dryden.
  2. To fall or rush into distress or any state or circumstances in which the person or thing is enveloped, inclosed or overwhelmed; as, to plunge into a gulf; to plunge into debt or embarrassments; to plunge into war; a body of cavalry plunged into the midst of the enemy.
  3. To pitch or throw one's self headlong.

PLUNGE, v.t. [Fr. plonger; Arm. plungea or plugein; W. plwng, a plunge, from the same root as llwnc or llwng, the gullet, a gulp or swallow; probably connected with luncheon.]

  1. To thrust into water or other fluid substance, or into any substance that is penetrable; to immerse in a fluid; to drive into flesh, mire or earth, &c.; as, to plunge the body in water; to plunge the arm into fire or flame; to plunge a dagger into the breast. – Milton. Dryden.
  2. To thrust or drive into any state in which the thing is considered as enveloped or surrounded; as, to plunge one's self into difficulties or distress; to plunge a nation into war.
  3. To baptize by immersion.

Plunge
  1. To thrust into water, or into any substance that is penetrable] to immerse; to cause to penetrate or enter quickly and forcibly; to thrust; as, to plunge the body into water; to plunge a dagger into the breast. Also used figuratively; as, to plunge a nation into war.

    "To plunge the boy in pleasing sleep." Dryden.

    Bound and plunged him into a cell. Tennyson.

    We shall be plunged into perpetual errors. I. Watts.

  2. To thrust or cast one's self into water or other fluid; to submerge one's self; to dive, or to rush in; as, he plunged into the river. Also used figuratively; as, to plunge into debt.

    Forced to plunge naked in the raging sea. Dryden.

    To plunge into guilt of a murther. Tillotson.

  3. The act of thrusting into or submerging; a dive, leap, rush, or pitch into, or as into, water; as, to take the water with a plunge.
  4. To baptize by immersion.
  5. To pitch or throw one's self headlong or violently forward, as a horse does.

    Some wild colt, which . . . flings and plunges. Bp. Hall.

  6. Hence, a desperate hazard or act; a state of being submerged or overwhelmed with difficulties.

    [R.]

    She was brought to that plunge, to conceal her husband's murder or accuse her son. Sir P. Sidney.

    And with thou not reach out a friendly arm,
    To raise me from amidst this plunge of sorrows?
    Addison.

  7. To entangle; to embarrass; to overcome.

    [Obs.]

    Plunged and graveled with three lines of Seneca. Sir T. Browne.

  8. To bet heavily and with seeming recklessness on a race, or other contest; in an extended sense, to risk large sums in hazardous speculations.

    [Cant]

    Plunging fire (Gun.), firing directed upon an enemy from an elevated position.

  9. The act of pitching or throwing one's self headlong or violently forward, like an unruly horse.
  10. Heavy and reckless betting in horse racing; hazardous speculation.

    [Cant]

    Plunge bath, an immersion by plunging; also, a large bath in which the bather can wholly immerse himself. -- Plunge, or plunging, battery (Elec.), a voltaic battery so arranged that the plates can be plunged into, or withdrawn from, the exciting liquid at pleasure.

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Plunge

PLUNGE, verb transitive

1. To thrust into water or other fluid substance, or into any substance that is penetrable; to immerse in a fluid; to drive into flesh, mire or earth, etc.; as, to plunge the body in water; to plunge the arm into fire or flame; to plunge a dagger into the breast.

2. To thrust or drive into any state in which the thing is considered as enveloped or surrounded; as, to plunge one's self into difficulties or distress; to plunge a nation into war.

3. To baptize by immersion.

PLUNGE, verb intransitive To pitch; to thrust or drive one's self into water or a fluid; to dive or to rush in. He plunged into the river.

The troops plunged into the stream.

His courser plung'd,

And threw him off; the waves whelm'd over him.

1. To fall or rush into distress or any state or circumstances in which the person or thing is enveloped, inclosed or overwhelmed; as, to plunge into a gulf; to plunge into debt or embarrassments; to plunge into war; a body of cavalry plunged into the midst of the enemy.

2. To pitch or throw one's self headlong.

PLUNGE, noun The act of thrusting into water or any penetrable substance.

1. Difficulty; strait; distress; a state of being surrounded or overwhelmed with difficulties.

People when put to a plunge cry out to heaven for help.

And wilt thou not reach out a friendly arm,

To raise me from amidst this plunge of sorrow?

[In this sense, the word is now little used.]

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

obstruction

OBSTRUC'TION, n. [L. obstructio.]

1. The act of obstructing.

2. Obstacle; impediment; any thing that stops or closes a way or channel. Bars of sand at the mouths of rivers are often obstructions to navigation.

3. That which impedes progress; hinderance. disunion and party spirit are often obstructions to legislative measures and to public prosperity.

4. A heap. [Not proper.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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