HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Friday - June 18, 2021

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [plow]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

plow

PLOW, n.

1. In agriculture, an instrument for turning up, breaking and preparing the ground for receiving the seed. It is drawn by oxen or horses and saves the labor of digging; it is therefore the most useful instrument in agriculture.

The emperor lays hold of the plow and turns up several furrows.

When fern succeeds, ungrateful to the plow.

2. Figuratively, tillage; culture of the earth; agriculture.

3. A joiner's instrument for grooving.

PLOW, v.t. To trench and turn up with a plow; as, to plow the ground for wheat; to plow it into ridges.

1. To furrow; to divide; to run through in sailing.

With speed we plow the watery wave.

2. To tear; to furrow.

3. In Scripture, to labor in any calling.

He that ploweth should plow in hope. 1 Cor.9.

To plow on the back, to scourge; to mangle, or to persecute and torment. Ps.129.

To plow with one's heifer, to deal with the wife to obtain something from the husband. Judges 14.

To plow iniquity or wickedness, and reap it, to devise and practice it, and at last suffer the punishment of it. Job.14. Hos.10.

To plow in, to cover by plowing; as, to plow in wheat.

To plow up or out, to turn out of the ground by plowing.

To put one's hand to the plow and look back, is to enter on the service of Christ and afterwards abandon it. Luke 9.

[This difference of orthography often made between the noun and verb is wholly unwarrantable, and contrary to settled analogy in our language. Such a difference is never made in changing into verbs, plot, harrow, notice, question, and most other words. See Practice.]




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [plow]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

PLOW, n.

1. In agriculture, an instrument for turning up, breaking and preparing the ground for receiving the seed. It is drawn by oxen or horses and saves the labor of digging; it is therefore the most useful instrument in agriculture.

The emperor lays hold of the plow and turns up several furrows.

When fern succeeds, ungrateful to the plow.

2. Figuratively, tillage; culture of the earth; agriculture.

3. A joiner's instrument for grooving.

PLOW, v.t. To trench and turn up with a plow; as, to plow the ground for wheat; to plow it into ridges.

1. To furrow; to divide; to run through in sailing.

With speed we plow the watery wave.

2. To tear; to furrow.

3. In Scripture, to labor in any calling.

He that ploweth should plow in hope. 1 Cor.9.

To plow on the back, to scourge; to mangle, or to persecute and torment. Ps.129.

To plow with one's heifer, to deal with the wife to obtain something from the husband. Judges 14.

To plow iniquity or wickedness, and reap it, to devise and practice it, and at last suffer the punishment of it. Job.14. Hos.10.

To plow in, to cover by plowing; as, to plow in wheat.

To plow up or out, to turn out of the ground by plowing.

To put one's hand to the plow and look back, is to enter on the service of Christ and afterwards abandon it. Luke 9.

[This difference of orthography often made between the noun and verb is wholly unwarrantable, and contrary to settled analogy in our language. Such a difference is never made in changing into verbs, plot, harrow, notice, question, and most other words. See Practice.]


PLOW, n. [Norm. ploge; Sax. ploge; D. ploeg; G. pflug Dan. ploug, plov; Ice. plog; Sw. id.; Russ. plug; Polish, plug; Scot. pleuch, pleugh. It corresponds in elements with plug, and both perhaps from thrusting.]

  1. In agriculture, an instrument for turning up, breaking and preparing the ground for receiving the seed. It is drawn by oxen or horses, and saves the labor of digging; it is therefore the most useful instrument in agriculture. The emperor lays hold of the plow and turns up several furrows. – Grosier, Trans. Where fern succeeds, ungrateful to the plow. – Dryden.
  2. Figuratively, tillage; culture of the earth; agriculture.
  3. A joiner's instrument for grooving.

PLOW, v.t.

  1. To trench and turn up with a plow; as, to plow the ground for wheat; to plow it into ridges.
  2. To furrow; to divide; to run through in sailing. With speed we plow the watery wave. – Pope.
  3. To tear; to furrow. – Shak.
  4. In Scripture, to labor in any calling. He that ploweth should plow in hope. – 1 Cor. ix. To plow on the back, to scourge; to mangle, or to persecute and torment. – Ps. cxxix. To plow with one's heifer, to deal with the wife to obtain something from the husband. Judges xiv. To plow iniquity or wickedness, and reap it, to devise and practice it, and at last suffer the punishment of it. – Job xiv. Hos. x. To plow in, to cover by plowing; as, to plow in wheat. To plow up or out, to turn out of the ground by plowing. To put one's hand to the plow and look back, is to enter on the service of Christ and afterward abandon it. – Luke ix. [The difference of orthography often made between the noun and verb is wholly unwarrantable, and contrary to settled analogy in our language. Such a difference is never made in changing into verbs, plot, harrow, notice, question, and most other words. See Practice.]

Plow
  1. A well-known implement, drawn by horses, mules, oxen, or other power, for turning up the soil to prepare it for bearing crops; also used to furrow or break up the soil for other purposes; as, the subsoil plow; the draining plow.

    Where fern succeeds ungrateful to the plow. Dryden.

  2. To turn up, break up, or trench, with a plow] to till with, or as with, a plow; as, to plow the ground; to plow a field.
  3. To labor with, or as with, a plow; to till or turn up the soil with a plow; to prepare the soil or bed for anything.

    Shak.

    Doth the plowman plow all day to sow ? Isa. xxviii. 24.

  4. Fig.: Agriculture; husbandry.

    Johnson.
  5. To furrow; to make furrows, grooves, or ridges in; to run through, as in sailing.

    Let patient Octavia plow thy visage up
    With her prepared nails.
    Shak.

    With speed we plow the watery way. Pope.

  6. A carucate of land; a plowland.

    [Obs.] [Eng.]

    Johan, mine eldest son, shall have plowes five. Tale of Gamelyn.

  7. To trim, or shave off the edges of, as a book or paper, with a plow. See Plow, n., 5.
  8. A joiner's plane for making grooves; a grooving plane.
  9. To cut a groove in, as in a plank, or the edge of a board; especially, a rectangular groove to receive the end of a shelf or tread, the edge of a panel, a tongue, etc.

    To plow in, to cover by plowing; as, to plow in wheat. -- To plow up, to turn out of the ground by plowing.

  10. An implement for trimming or shaving off the edges of books.
  11. Same as Charles's Wain.

    Ice plow, a plow used for cutting ice on rivers, ponds, etc., into cakes suitable for storing. [U. S.] -- Mackerel plow. See under Mackerel. - - Plow alms, a penny formerly paid by every plowland to the church. Cowell. -- Plow beam, that part of the frame of a plow to which the draught is applied. See Beam, n., 9. -- Plow Monday, the Monday after Twelth Day, or the end of Christmas holidays. -- Plow staff. (a) A kind of long-handled spade or paddle for cleaning the plowshare; a paddle staff. (b) A plow handle. -- Snow plow, a structure, usually ***LAMBDA]-shaped, for removing snow from sidewalks, railroads, etc., -- drawn or driven by a horse or a locomotive.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

107

761

89

834

134

849
Plow

PLOW, noun

1. In agriculture, an instrument for turning up, breaking and preparing the ground for receiving the seed. It is drawn by oxen or horses and saves the labor of digging; it is therefore the most useful instrument in agriculture.

The emperor lays hold of the plow and turns up several furrows.

When fern succeeds, ungrateful to the plow

2. Figuratively, tillage; culture of the earth; agriculture.

3. A joiner's instrument for grooving.

PLOW, verb transitive To trench and turn up with a plow; as, to plow the ground for wheat; to plow it into ridges.

1. To furrow; to divide; to run through in sailing.

With speed we plow the watery wave.

2. To tear; to furrow.

3. In Scripture, to labor in any calling.

He that ploweth should plow in hope. 1 Corinthians 9:10.

To plow on the back, to scourge; to mangle, or to persecute and torment. Psalms 129:3.

To plow with one's heifer, to deal with the wife to obtain something from the husband. Judges 14:18.

To plow iniquity or wickedness, and reap it, to devise and practice it, and at last suffer the punishment of it. Job 4:8. Hosea 10:11.

To plow in, to cover by plowing; as, to plow in wheat.

To plow up or out, to turn out of the ground by plowing.

To put one's hand to the plow and look back, is to enter on the service of Christ and afterwards abandon it. Luke 17:7.

[This difference of orthography often made between the noun and verb is wholly unwarrantable, and contrary to settled analogy in our language. Such a difference is never made in changing into verbs, plot, harrow, notice, question, and most other words. See Practice.]

Why 1828?

1
4
 


I use it as a homeschooling resource in conjunction with McGuffey Readers.

— McGuffey (Indianapolis, IN)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

commingle

COMMINGLE, v.t. To mix together; to mingle in one mass, or intimately; to blend. [See Mingle.]

COMMINGLE, v.i. To mix or unite together, as different substances.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

245

430

Compact Edition

230

176

CD-ROM

184

139

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.305 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top