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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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pitch

PITCH, n. [L. pix; Gr. most probably named from its thickness or inspissation; L. figo.]

1. A thick tenacious substance,the juice of a species of pine or fir called abies picea, obtained by incision from the bark of the tree. When melted and pressed in bags of cloth, it is received into barrels. This is white or Burgundy pitch; by mixture with lampblack it is converted into black pitch. When kept long in fusion with vinegar, it becomes dry and brown, and forms colophony. The smoke of pitch condensed forms lampblack.

2. The resin of pine, or turpentine, inspissated; used in caulking ships and paying the sides and bottom.

PITCH, n. [from the root of pike, peak.]

1. Literally, a point; hence, any point or degree of elevation; as a high pitch; lowest pitch.

How high a pitch his resolution soars.

Alcibiades was one of the best orators of his age, notwithstanding he lived when learning was at its highest pitch.

2. Highest rise.

3. Size; stature.

So like in person, garb and pitch.

4. Degree; rate.

No pitch of glory from the grave is free.

5. The point where a declivity begins, or the declivity itself; descent; slope; as the pitch of a hill.

6. The degree of descent or declivity.

7. A descent; a fall; a thrusting down.

8. Degree of elevation of the key-note of a tune or of any note.

PITCH, v.t. [L. figo, to fix, and uniting pike, pique with fix.]

1. To throw or thrust, and primarily, to thrust a long or pointed object; hence, to fix; to plant; to set; as, to pitch a tent or pavilion, that is, to set the stakes.

2. To throw at a point; as, to pitch quoits.

3. To throw headlong; as, to pitch one in the mire or down a precipice.

4. To throw with a fork; as, to pitch hay or sheaves of corn.

5. To regulate or set the key-note of a tune in music.

6. To set in array; to marshal or arrange in order; used chiefly in the participle; as a pitched battle.

7. [from pitch.] To smear or pay over with pitch; as, to pitch the seams of a ship.

PITCH, v.i. To light; to settle; to come to rest from flight.

Take a branch of the tree on which the bees pitch, and wipe the hive.

1. To fall headlong; as, to pitch from a precipice; to pitch on the head.

2. To plunge; as, to pitch into a river.

3. To fall; to fix choice; with on or upon.

Pitch upon the best course of life, and custom will render it the most easy.

4. To fix a tent or temporary habitation; to encamp.

Laban with his brethren pitched in the mount of Gilead. Gen.31.

5. In navigation, to rise and fall, as the head and stern of a ship passing over waves.

6. To flow or fall precipitously, as a river.

Over this rock, the river pitches in one entire sheet.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [pitch]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

PITCH, n. [L. pix; Gr. most probably named from its thickness or inspissation; L. figo.]

1. A thick tenacious substance,the juice of a species of pine or fir called abies picea, obtained by incision from the bark of the tree. When melted and pressed in bags of cloth, it is received into barrels. This is white or Burgundy pitch; by mixture with lampblack it is converted into black pitch. When kept long in fusion with vinegar, it becomes dry and brown, and forms colophony. The smoke of pitch condensed forms lampblack.

2. The resin of pine, or turpentine, inspissated; used in caulking ships and paying the sides and bottom.

PITCH, n. [from the root of pike, peak.]

1. Literally, a point; hence, any point or degree of elevation; as a high pitch; lowest pitch.

How high a pitch his resolution soars.

Alcibiades was one of the best orators of his age, notwithstanding he lived when learning was at its highest pitch.

2. Highest rise.

3. Size; stature.

So like in person, garb and pitch.

4. Degree; rate.

No pitch of glory from the grave is free.

5. The point where a declivity begins, or the declivity itself; descent; slope; as the pitch of a hill.

6. The degree of descent or declivity.

7. A descent; a fall; a thrusting down.

8. Degree of elevation of the key-note of a tune or of any note.

PITCH, v.t. [L. figo, to fix, and uniting pike, pique with fix.]

1. To throw or thrust, and primarily, to thrust a long or pointed object; hence, to fix; to plant; to set; as, to pitch a tent or pavilion, that is, to set the stakes.

2. To throw at a point; as, to pitch quoits.

3. To throw headlong; as, to pitch one in the mire or down a precipice.

4. To throw with a fork; as, to pitch hay or sheaves of corn.

5. To regulate or set the key-note of a tune in music.

6. To set in array; to marshal or arrange in order; used chiefly in the participle; as a pitched battle.

7. [from pitch.] To smear or pay over with pitch; as, to pitch the seams of a ship.

PITCH, v.i. To light; to settle; to come to rest from flight.

Take a branch of the tree on which the bees pitch, and wipe the hive.

1. To fall headlong; as, to pitch from a precipice; to pitch on the head.

2. To plunge; as, to pitch into a river.

3. To fall; to fix choice; with on or upon.

Pitch upon the best course of life, and custom will render it the most easy.

4. To fix a tent or temporary habitation; to encamp.

Laban with his brethren pitched in the mount of Gilead. Gen.31.

5. In navigation, to rise and fall, as the head and stern of a ship passing over waves.

6. To flow or fall precipitously, as a river.

Over this rock, the river pitches in one entire sheet.

PITCH, n.1 [Sax. pic; D. pik; G. pech; Sw. beck; Dan. beg or beeg; Ir. pic or pech; W. pyg; Sp. pez; It. pece; Ir. poix; L. pix; Gr. πισσα or πιττα; most probably named from its thickness or inspissation, from the root of πηγω, πηγνυω, πησσω, L. figo. See Class Bg, No. 23, 24, 33, 66.]

  1. A thick tenacious substance, the juice of a species of pine or fir called Abies picea, obtained by incision from the bark of the tree. When melted and pressed in bags of cloth, it is received into barrels. This is white or Burgundy pitch; by mixture with lampblack it is converted into black pitch. When kept long in fusion with vinegar, it becomes dry and brown, and forms colophony. The smoke of pitch condensed forms lampblack. – Fourcroy.
  2. The impure resin of pine, or turpentine, inspissated; used in calking ships and paying the sides and bottom.

PITCH, n.2 [from the root of pike, peak, W. pig. See the Verb.]

  1. Literally, a point; hence, any point or degree of elevation; as, a high pitch; lowest pitch. How high a pitch his resolution soars. – Shak. Alcibiades was one of the best orators of his age, notwithstanding he lived when learning was at its highest pitch. – Addison.
  2. Highest rise. – Shak.
  3. Size; stature. So like in person, garb and pitch. – Hudibras.
  4. Degree; rate. No pitch of glory from the grave is free. – Waller.
  5. The point where a declivity begins, or the declivity itself; descent; slope; as, the pitch of a hill.
  6. The degree of descent or declivity.
  7. A descent; a fall; a thrusting down.
  8. Degree of elevation of the key-note of a tune, or of any note.

PITCH, v.i.

  1. To light; to settle; to come to rest from flight. Take a branch of the tree on which the bees pitch, and wipe the hive. – Mortimer.
  2. To fall headlong; as, to pitch from a precipice; to pitch on the head. – Dryden.
  3. To plunge; as, to pitch into a river.
  4. To fall; to fix choice; with on or upon. Pitch upon the best course of life, and custom will render it the most easy. – Tillotson.
  5. To fix a tent or temporary habitation; to encamp. Laban with his brethren pitched in the mount of Gilead. – Gen. xxxi.
  6. In navigation, to rise and fall, as the head and stern of a ship passing over waves.
  7. To flow or fall precipitously, as a river. Over this rock the river pitches in one entire sheet. – B. Trumbull.

PITCH, v.t. [formerly pight; W. piciaw, to dart, from pig, a point, a pike; D. pikken, to peck, to pick, to pitch; G. pichen; Fr. ficher; Arm. ficha; coinciding with L. figo, to fix, and uniting pike, pique with fix, Sp. picar, It. piccare, to prick or sting.]

  1. To throw or thrust, and primarily, to thrust a long or pointed object; hence, to fix; to plant; to set; as, to pitch a tent or pavilion, that is, to set the stakes. – Dryden.
  2. To throw at a point; as, to pitch quoits.
  3. To throw headlong; as, to pitch one in the mire or down a precipice.
  4. To throw with a fork; as, to pitch hay or sheaves of corn.
  5. To regulate or set the key-note of a tune in music.
  6. To set in array; to marshal or arrange in order; used chiefly in the participle; as, a pitched battle.
  7. [from pitch.] To smear or pay over with pitch; as, to pitch the seams of a ship.

Pitch
  1. A thick, black, lustrous, and sticky substance obtained by boiling down tar. It is used in calking the seams of ships; also in coating rope, canvas, wood, ironwork, etc., to preserve them.

    He that toucheth pitch shall be defiled therewith. Ecclus. xiii. 1.

  2. To cover over or smear with pitch.

    Gen. vi. 14.
  3. To throw, generally with a definite aim or purpose; to cast; to hurl; to toss; as, to pitch quoits; to pitch hay; to pitch a ball.
  4. To fix or place a tent or temporary habitation; to encamp.

    "Laban with his brethren pitched in the Mount of Gilead." Gen. xxxi. 25.
  5. A throw; a toss; a cast, as of something from the hand; as, a good pitch in quoits.

    Pitch and toss, a game played by tossing up a coin, and calling "Heads or tails;" hence: To play pitch and toss with (anything), to be careless or trust to luck about it. "To play pitch and toss with the property of the country." G. Eliot. -- Pitch farthing. See Chuck farthing, under 5th Chuck.

  6. The distance between symmetrically arranged or corresponding parts of an armature, measured along a line, called the pitch line, drawn around its length. Sometimes half of this distance is called the pitch.

    Pitch of poles (Elec.), the distance between a pair of poles of opposite sign.

  7. See Pitchstone.

    Amboyna pitch, the resin of Dammara australis. See Kauri. -- Burgundy pitch. See under Burgundy. -- Canada pitch, the resinous exudation of the hemlock tree (Abies Canadensis); hemlock gum. -- Jew's pitch, bitumen. -- Mineral pitch. See Bitumen and Asphalt. -- Pitch coal (Min.), bituminous coal. -- Pitch peat (Min.), a black homogeneous peat, with a waxy luster. -- Pitch pine (Bot.), any one of several species of pine, yielding pitch, esp. the Pinus rigida of North America.

  8. Fig.: To darken] to blacken; to obscure.

    The welkin pitched with sullen could. Addison.

  9. To thrust or plant in the ground, as stakes or poles; hence, to fix firmly, as by means of poles; to establish; to arrange; as, to pitch a tent; to pitch a camp.
  10. To light; to settle; to come to rest from flight.

    The tree whereon they [the bees] pitch. Mortimer.

  11. That point of the ground on which the ball pitches or lights when bowled.
  12. To set, face, or pave with rubble or undressed stones, as an embankment or a roadway.

    Knight.
  13. To fix one's choise; -- with on or upon.

    Pitch upon the best course of life, and custom will render it the more easy. Tillotson.

  14. A point or peak; the extreme point or degree of elevation or depression; hence, a limit or bound.

    Driven headlong from the pitch of heaven, down
    Into this deep.
    Milton.

    Enterprises of great pitch and moment. Shak.

    To lowest pitch of abject fortune. Milton.

    He lived when learning was at its highest pitch. Addison.

    The exact pitch, or limits, where temperance ends. Sharp.

  15. To fix or set the tone of; as, to pitch a tune.
  16. To plunge or fall; esp., to fall forward; to decline or slope; as, to pitch from a precipice; the vessel pitches in a heavy sea; the field pitches toward the east.

    Pitch and pay, an old aphorism which inculcates ready-money payment, or payment on delivery of goods. Shak.

  17. Height; stature.

    [Obs.] Hudibras.
  18. To set or fix, as a price or value.

    [Obs.] Shak.

    Pitched battle, a general battle; a battle in which the hostile forces have fixed positions; -- in distinction from a skirmish. -- To pitch into, to attack; to assault; to abuse. [Slang]

  19. A descent; a fall; a thrusting down.
  20. The point where a declivity begins; hence, the declivity itself; a descending slope; the degree or rate of descent or slope; slant; as, a steep pitch in the road; the pitch of a roof.
  21. The relative acuteness or gravity of a tone, determined by the number of vibrations which produce it; the place of any tone upon a scale of high and low.

    * Musical tones with reference to absolute pitch, are named after the first seven letters of the alphabet; with reference to relative pitch, in a series of tones called the scale, they are called one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight. Eight is also one of a new scale an octave higher, as one is eight of a scale an octave lower.

  22. The limit of ground set to a miner who receives a share of the ore taken out.
  23. The distance from center to center of any two adjacent teeth of gearing, measured on the pitch line; -- called also circular pitch.

    (b)
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Pitch

PITCH, noun [Latin pix; Gr. most probably named from its thickness or inspissation; Latin figo.]

1. A thick tenacious substance, the juice of a species of pine or fir called abies picea, obtained by incision from the bark of the tree. When melted and pressed in bags of cloth, it is received into barrels. This is white or Burgundy pitch; by mixture with lampblack it is converted into black pitch When kept long in fusion with vinegar, it becomes dry and brown, and forms colophony. The smoke of pitch condensed forms lampblack.

2. The resin of pine, or turpentine, inspissated; used in caulking ships and paying the sides and bottom.

PITCH, noun [from the root of pike, peak.]

1. Literally, a point; hence, any point or degree of elevation; as a high pitch; lowest pitch

How high a pitch his resolution soars.

Alcibiades was one of the best orators of his age, notwithstanding he lived when learning was at its highest pitch

2. Highest rise.

3. Size; stature.

So like in person, garb and pitch

4. Degree; rate.

No pitch of glory from the grave is free.

5. The point where a declivity begins, or the declivity itself; descent; slope; as the pitch of a hill.

6. The degree of descent or declivity.

7. A descent; a fall; a thrusting down.

8. Degree of elevation of the key-note of a tune or of any note.

PITCH, verb transitive [Latin figo, to fix, and uniting pike, pique with fix.]

1. To throw or thrust, and primarily, to thrust a long or pointed object; hence, to fix; to plant; to set; as, to pitch a tent or pavilion, that is, to set the stakes.

2. To throw at a point; as, to pitch quoits.

3. To throw headlong; as, to pitch one in the mire or down a precipice.

4. To throw with a fork; as, to pitch hay or sheaves of corn.

5. To regulate or set the key-note of a tune in music.

6. To set in array; to marshal or arrange in order; used chiefly in the participle; as a pitched battle.

7. [from pitch ] To smear or pay over with pitch; as, to pitch the seams of a ship.

PITCH, verb intransitive To light; to settle; to come to rest from flight.

Take a branch of the tree on which the bees pitch and wipe the hive.

1. To fall headlong; as, to pitch from a precipice; to pitch on the head.

2. To plunge; as, to pitch into a river.

3. To fall; to fix choice; with on or upon.

PITCH upon the best course of life, and custom will render it the most easy.

4. To fix a tent or temporary habitation; to encamp.

Laban with his brethren pitched in the mount of Gilead. Genesis 31:25.

5. In navigation, to rise and fall, as the head and stern of a ship passing over waves.

6. To flow or fall precipitously, as a river.

Over this rock, the river pitches in one entire sheet.

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For Bible Study

— David (York, PA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

lord

LORD, n.

1. A master; a person possessing supreme power and authority; a ruler; a governor.

Man over man he made not lord.

But now I was the lord of this fair mansion.

2. A tyrant; an oppressive ruler.

3. A husband.

I oft in bitterness of soul deplores my absent daughter, and my dearer lord.

My lord also being old. Gen. 18.

4. A baron; the proprietor of a manor; as the lord of the manor.

5. A nobleman; a title of honor in Great Britain given to those who are noble by birth or creation; a peer of the realm, including dukes, marquises, earls, viscounts and barons. Archbishops and bishops also, as members of the house of lords, are lords of parliament. Thus we say, lords temporal and spiritual. By courtesy also the title is given to the sons of dukes and marquises, and to the eldest sons of earls.

6. An honorary title bestowed on certain official characters; as lord advocate, lord chamberlain, lord chancellor, lord chief justice, &c.

7. In scripture, the Supreme Being; Jehovah. When Lord, in the Old Testament, is prints in capitals, it is the translation of JEHOVAH, and so might, with more propriety, be rendered. The word is applied to Christ, Ps. 110. Col. 3. and to the Holy Spirit, 2Thess. 3. As a title of respect, it is applied to kings, Gen. 40. 2Sam. 19. to princes and nobles, Gen 42. Dan. 4. to a husband, Gen. 18. to a prophet, 1Kings 18. 2Kings 2. and to a respectable person, Gen. 24. Christ is called the Lord of glory, 1Cor. 2. and Lord of lords, Rev. 19.

LORD, v.t. To invest with the dignity and privileges of a lord.

LORD, v.i. To domineer; to rule with arbitrary or despotic sway; sometimes followed by over, and sometimes by it, in the manner of a transitive verb.

The whiles she lordeth in licentious bliss.

I see them lording it in London streets.

They lorded over them whom now they serve.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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