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Tuesday - August 4, 2020

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [period]

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period

PE'RIOD, n. [L. periodus; Gr. about, and way.]

1. Properly, a circuit; hence, the time which is taken up by a planet in making its revolution round the sun, or the duration of its course till it returns to the point of its orbit where it began. Thus the period of the earth or its annual revolution is 365 days, 6 hours, 9 minutes, and 30 seconds.

2. In chronology, a stated number of years; a revolution or series of years by which time is measured; as the Calippic period; the Dionysian period; the Julian period.

3. Any series of years or of days in which a revolution is completed, and the same course is to begun.

4. Any specified portion of time, designated by years, months, days or hours complete; as a period of a thousand years; the period of a year; the period of a day.

5. End; conclusion. Death puts a period to a state of probation.

6. An indefinite portion of any continued state, existence or series of events; as the first period of life; the last period of a king's reign; the early periods of history.

7. State at which any thing terminates; limit.

8. Length or usual length of duration.

9. A complete sentence from one full stop to another.

Periods are beautiful when they are not too long.

10. The point that marks the end of a complete sentence; a full stop,thus, (.)

11. In numbers, a distinction made by a point or comma after every sixth place or figure.

12. In medicine, the time of intention and remission of a disease, or of the paroxysm and remission.

Julian period, in chronology, a period of 7980 years; a number produced by multiplying 28, the years of the solar cycle, into 19, the years of the lunar cycle, and their product by 15, the years of the Roman indiction.

PE'RIOD, v.t. To put an end to. [Not used.]




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [period]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

PE'RIOD, n. [L. periodus; Gr. about, and way.]

1. Properly, a circuit; hence, the time which is taken up by a planet in making its revolution round the sun, or the duration of its course till it returns to the point of its orbit where it began. Thus the period of the earth or its annual revolution is 365 days, 6 hours, 9 minutes, and 30 seconds.

2. In chronology, a stated number of years; a revolution or series of years by which time is measured; as the Calippic period; the Dionysian period; the Julian period.

3. Any series of years or of days in which a revolution is completed, and the same course is to begun.

4. Any specified portion of time, designated by years, months, days or hours complete; as a period of a thousand years; the period of a year; the period of a day.

5. End; conclusion. Death puts a period to a state of probation.

6. An indefinite portion of any continued state, existence or series of events; as the first period of life; the last period of a king's reign; the early periods of history.

7. State at which any thing terminates; limit.

8. Length or usual length of duration.

9. A complete sentence from one full stop to another.

Periods are beautiful when they are not too long.

10. The point that marks the end of a complete sentence; a full stop,thus, (.)

11. In numbers, a distinction made by a point or comma after every sixth place or figure.

12. In medicine, the time of intention and remission of a disease, or of the paroxysm and remission.

Julian period, in chronology, a period of 7980 years; a number produced by multiplying 28, the years of the solar cycle, into 19, the years of the lunar cycle, and their product by 15, the years of the Roman indiction.

PE'RIOD, v.t. To put an end to. [Not used.]


PE'RI-OD, n. [L. periodus; Fr. periode; It. Sp. and Port. periodo; Gr. περιοδος; περι, about, and ὁδος, way.]

  1. Properly, a circuit; hence, the time which is taken up by a planet in making its revolution round the sun, or the duration of its course till it returns to the point of its orbit where it began. Thus the period of the earth or its annual revolution is 365 days, 6 hours, 9 minutes, and 30 seconds. – Encyc.
  2. In chronology, a stated number of years; a revolution or series of years by which time is measured; as, the Calippic period; the Dionysian period; the Julian period.
  3. Any series of years or of days in which a revolution is completed, and the same course is to be begun.
  4. Any specified portion of time, designated by years, months, days or hours complete as, a period of a thousand years; the period of a year; the period of a day.
  5. End; conclusion. Death puts a period to a state of probation.
  6. An indefinite portion of any continued state, existence or series of events; as, the first period of life; the last period of a king's reign; the early periods of history.
  7. State at which any thing terminates; limit.
  8. Length or usual length of duration. Some experiments would be made how by art to make plants more tasting than their ordinary period. – Bacon.
  9. A complete sentence from one full stop to another. Periods are beautiful when they are not too long. – B. Jonson.
  10. The point that marks the end of a complete sentence; a full stop, thus ( . ).
  11. In numbers, a distinction made by a point or comma after every sixth place or figure. – Encyc.
  12. In medicine, the time of the exacerbation and remission of a disease, or of the paroxysm and intermission. Encyc. Julian period, in chronology, a period of 7980 years; a number produced by multiplying 23, the years of the solar cycle, into 19, the years of the lunar cycle, and their product by 15, the years of the Roman indiction.

PE'RI-OD, v.t.

To put an end to. [Not used.] – Shak.


Pe"ri*od
  1. A portion of time as limited and determined by some recurring phenomenon, as by the completion of a revolution of one of the heavenly bodies; a division of time, as a series of years, months, or days, in which something is completed, and ready to recommence and go on in the same order; as, the period of the sun, or the earth, or a comet.
  2. To put an end to.

    [Obs.] Shak.
  3. To come to a period; to conclude. [Obs.] "You may period upon this, that," etc.

    Felthman.
  4. A stated and recurring interval of time; more generally, an interval of time specified or left indefinite; a certain series of years, months, days, or the like; a time; a cycle; an age; an epoch; as, the period of the Roman republic.

    How by art to make plants more lasting than their ordinary period. Bacon.

  5. One of the great divisions of geological time; as, the Tertiary period; the Glacial period. See the Chart of Geology.
  6. The termination or completion of a revolution, cycle, series of events, single event, or act; hence, a limit; a bound; an end; a conclusion.

    Bacon.

    So spake the archangel Michael; then paused,
    As at the world's great period.
    Milton.

    Evils which shall never end till eternity hath a period. Jer. Taylor.

    This is the period of my ambition. Shak.

  7. A complete sentence, from one full stop to another; esp., a well-proportioned, harmonious sentence.

    "Devolved his rounded periods." Tennyson.

    Periods are beautiful when they are not too long. B. Johnson.

    * The period, according to Heyse, is a compound sentence consisting of a protasis and apodosis; according to Becker, it is the appropriate form for the coördinate propositions related by antithesis or causality. Gibbs.

  8. The punctuation point [.] that marks the end of a complete sentence, or of an abbreviated word.
  9. One of several similar sets of figures or terms usually marked by points or commas placed at regular intervals, as in numeration, in the extraction of roots, and in circulating decimals.

  10. The time of the exacerbation and remission of a disease, or of the paroxysm and intermission.
  11. A complete musical sentence.

    The period, the present or current time, as distinguished from all other times.

    Syn. -- Time; date; epoch; era; age; duration; limit; bound; end; conclusion; determination.

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Period

PE'RIOD, noun [Latin periodus; Gr. about, and way.]

1. Properly, a circuit; hence, the time which is taken up by a planet in making its revolution round the sun, or the duration of its course till it returns to the point of its orbit where it began. Thus the period of the earth or its annual revolution is 365 days, 6 hours, 9 minutes, and 30 seconds.

2. In chronology, a stated number of years; a revolution or series of years by which time is measured; as the Calippic period; the Dionysian period; the Julian period

3. Any series of years or of days in which a revolution is completed, and the same course is to begun.

4. Any specified portion of time, designated by years, months, days or hours complete; as a period of a thousand years; the period of a year; the period of a day.

5. End; conclusion. Death puts a period to a state of probation.

6. An indefinite portion of any continued state, existence or series of events; as the first period of life; the last period of a king's reign; the early periods of history.

7. State at which any thing terminates; limit.

8. Length or usual length of duration.

9. A complete sentence from one full stop to another.

Periods are beautiful when they are not too long.

10. The point that marks the end of a complete sentence; a full stop, thus, (.)

11. In numbers, a distinction made by a point or comma after every sixth place or figure.

12. In medicine, the time of intention and remission of a disease, or of the paroxysm and remission.

Julian period in chronology, a period of 7980 years; a number produced by multiplying 28, the years of the solar cycle, into 19, the years of the lunar cycle, and their product by 15, the years of the Roman indiction.

PE'RIOD, verb transitive To put an end to. [Not used.]

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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tumbrel

TUM'BREL, n.

1. A ducking stool for the punishment of scolds.

2. A dung-cart.

3. A cart or carriage with two wheels, which accompanies troops or artillery, for conveying the tools of pioneers, cartridges and the like.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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