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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [perfect]

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perfect

PER'FECT, a. [L. perfectus, perficio, to complete; per and facio, to do or make through, to carry to the end.]

1. Finished; complete; consummate; not defective; having all that is requisite to its nature and kind; as a perfect statue; a perfect likeness; a perfect work; a perfect system.

As full, as perfect in a hair as heart.

2. Fully informed; completely skilled; as men perfect in the use of arms; perfect in discipline.

3. Complete in moral excellencies.

Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father who is in heaven is perfect. Matt.5.

4. Manifesting perfection.

My strength is made perfect in weakness. 2 Cor.12.

Perfect chord,in music, a concord or union of sounds which is perfectly coalescent and agreeable to the ear, as the fifth and the octave; a perfect consonance.

A perfect flower, in botany, has both stamen and pistil, or at least another and stigma.

Perfect tense, in grammar, the preterit tense; a tense which expresses an act completed.

PER'FECT, v.t. [L. perfectus, perficio.] To finish or complete so as to leave nothing wanting; to give to any thing all that is requisite to its nature and kind; as, to perfect a picture or statue. 2 Chron.8.

-Inquire into the nature and properties of things, and thereby perfect our ideas of distinct species.

If we love one another, God dwelleth in us, and his love is perfected in us. 1 John 4.

1. To instruct fully; to make fully skillful; as, to perfect one's self in the rules of music or architecture; to perfect soldiers in discipline.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [perfect]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

PER'FECT, a. [L. perfectus, perficio, to complete; per and facio, to do or make through, to carry to the end.]

1. Finished; complete; consummate; not defective; having all that is requisite to its nature and kind; as a perfect statue; a perfect likeness; a perfect work; a perfect system.

As full, as perfect in a hair as heart.

2. Fully informed; completely skilled; as men perfect in the use of arms; perfect in discipline.

3. Complete in moral excellencies.

Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father who is in heaven is perfect. Matt.5.

4. Manifesting perfection.

My strength is made perfect in weakness. 2 Cor.12.

Perfect chord,in music, a concord or union of sounds which is perfectly coalescent and agreeable to the ear, as the fifth and the octave; a perfect consonance.

A perfect flower, in botany, has both stamen and pistil, or at least another and stigma.

Perfect tense, in grammar, the preterit tense; a tense which expresses an act completed.

PER'FECT, v.t. [L. perfectus, perficio.] To finish or complete so as to leave nothing wanting; to give to any thing all that is requisite to its nature and kind; as, to perfect a picture or statue. 2 Chron.8.

-Inquire into the nature and properties of things, and thereby perfect our ideas of distinct species.

If we love one another, God dwelleth in us, and his love is perfected in us. 1 John 4.

1. To instruct fully; to make fully skillful; as, to perfect one's self in the rules of music or architecture; to perfect soldiers in discipline.

PER'FECT, a. [L. perfectus, perficio, to complete; per and facio, to do or make through, to carry to the end.]

  1. Finished; complete; consummate; not defective; having all that is requisite to its nature and kind; as, a perfect statue; a perfect likeness; a perfect work; a perfect system. As full, as perfect in a hair as heart. – Pope.
  2. Fully informed; completely skilled; as, men perfect in the use of arms; perfect in discipline.
  3. Complete in moral excellencies. Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father who is in heaven is perfect. – Matth. v.
  4. Manifesting perfection. My strength is made perfect in weakness. – 2 Cor. xii. Perfect chord, in music, a concord or union of sounds which is perfectly coalescent and agreeable to the ear, as the fifth and the octave; a perfect consonance. A perfect flower, in botany, has both stamen and pistil, or at least anther and stigma. – Martyn. Perfect tense, in grammar, the preterit tense; a tense which expresses an act completed.

PERFECT, v.t. [L. perfectus, perficio.]

  1. To finish or complete so as to leave nothing wanting; to give to any thing all that is requisite to its nature and kind; as, to perfect a picture or statue. – 2 Chron. viii. Inquire into the nature and properties of things, and thereby perfect our ideas of distinct species. – Locke. If we love one another, God dwelleth in us, and his love is perfected in us. – 1 John iv.
  2. To instruct fully; to make fully skillful; as, to perfect one's self in the rules of music or architecture; to perfect soldiers in discipline.

Per"fect
  1. Brought to consummation or completeness; completed; not defective nor redundant; having all the properties or qualities requisite to its nature and kind; without flaw, fault, or blemish; without error; mature; whole; pure; sound; right; correct.

    My strength is made perfect in weakness. 2 Cor. xii. 9.

    Three glorious suns, each one a perfect sun. Shak.

    I fear I am not in my perfect mind. Shak.

    O most entire perfect sacrifice! Keble.

    God made thee perfect, not immutable. Milton.

  2. The perfect tense, or a form in that tense.
  3. To make perfect] to finish or complete, so as to leave nothing wanting; to give to anything all that is requisite to its nature and kind.

    God dwelleth in us, and his love is perfect in us. 1 John iv. 12.

    Inquire into the nature and properties of the things, . . . and thereby perfect our ideas of their distinct species. Locke.

    Perfecting press (Print.), a press in which the printing on both sides of the paper is completed in one passage through the machine.

    Syn. -- To finish; accomplish; complete; consummate.

  4. Well informed; certain; sure.

    I am perfect that the Pannonains are now in arms. Shak.

  5. Hermaphrodite; having both stamens and pistils; -- said of flower.

    Perfect cadence (Mus.), a complete and satisfactory close in harmony, as upon the tonic preceded by the dominant. -- Perfect chord (Mus.), a concord or union of sounds which is perfectly coalescent and agreeable to the ear, as the unison, octave, fifth, and fourth; a perfect consonance; a common chord in its original position of keynote, third, fifth, and octave. -- Perfect number (Arith.), a number equal to the sum of all its divisors; as, 28, whose aliquot parts, or divisors, are 14, 7, 4, 2, 1. See Abundant number, under Abundant. Brande *** C. -- Perfect tense (Gram.), a tense which expresses an act or state completed.

    Syn. -- Finished] consummate; complete; entire; faultless; blameless; unblemished.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Perfect

PER'FECT, adjective [Latin perfectus, perficio, to complete; per and facio, to do or make through, to carry to the end.]

1. Finished; complete; consummate; not defective; having all that is requisite to its nature and kind; as a perfect statue; a perfect likeness; a perfect work; a perfect system.

As full, as perfect in a hair as heart.

2. Fully informed; completely skilled; as men perfect in the use of arms; perfect in discipline.

3. Complete in moral excellencies.

Be ye therefore perfect even as your Father who is in heaven is perfect Matthew 5:48.

4. Manifesting perfection.

My strength is made perfect in weakness. 2 Corinthians 12:9.

Perfect chord, in music, a concord or union of sounds which is perfectly coalescent and agreeable to the ear, as the fifth and the octave; a perfect consonance.

A perfect flower, in botany, has both stamen and pistil, or at least another and stigma.

Perfect tense, in grammar, the preterit tense; a tense which expresses an act completed.

PER'FECT, verb transitive [Latin perfectus, perficio.] To finish or complete so as to leave nothing wanting; to give to any thing all that is requisite to its nature and kind; as, to perfect a picture or statue. 2 Chronicles 8:16.

-Inquire into the nature and properties of things, and thereby perfect our ideas of distinct species.

If we love one another, God dwelleth in us, and his love is perfected in us. 1 John 4:1.

1. To instruct fully; to make fully skillful; as, to perfect one's self in the rules of music or architecture; to perfect soldiers in discipline.

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Classic definitions of words.

— Dave (Pueblo West, CO)

Word of the Day

earthly

EARTH'LY, a. Pertaining to the earth, or to this world.

Our earthly house of this tabernacle. 2 Cor.5.

1. Not heavenly; vile; mean,

This earthly load

Of death called life.

2. Belonging to our present state; as earthly objects; earthly residence.

3. Belonging to the earth or world; carnal; vile; as opposed to spiritual or heavenly.

Whose glory is in their shame, who mind earthly things. Phil.3.

4. Corporeal; not mental.

Random Word

steam

STEAM, n.

1. The vapor of water; or the elastic, aeriform fluid generated by heating water to the boiling point. When produced under the common atmospheric pressure, its elasticity is equivalent to the pressure, its elasticity is equivalent to the pressure of the atmosphere, and it is called low steam; but when heated in a confined state, its elastic force is rapidly augmented, and it is then called high steam. On the application of cold, steam instantly returns to the state of water, and thus forms a sudden vacuum. From this property, and from the facility with which an elastic force is generated by means of steam, this constitutes a mechanical agent at once the most powerful and the most manageable, as is seen in the vast and multiplied uses of the steam engine. Steam is invisible, and is to be distinguished from the cloud or mist which it forms in the air, that being water in a minute state of division, resulting from the condensation of steam.

2. In popular use, the mist formed by condensed vapor.

STEAM, v.i.

1. To rise or pass off in vapor by means of heat; to fume.

Let the crude humors dance in heated brass, steaming with fire intense.

2. To send off visible vapor.

Ye mists that rise from steaming lake.

3. To pass off in visible vapor.

The dissolved amber--steamed away into the air.

STEAM, v.t.

1. To exhale; to evaporate. [Not much used.]

2. To expose to steam; to apply steam to for softening, dressing or preparing; as, to steam cloth; to steam potatoes instead of boiling the; to steam food for cattle.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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