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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [passion]

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passion

PAS'SION, n. [L. passio, from patior, to suffer.]

1. The impression or effect of an external agent upon a body; that which is suffered or received.

A body at rest affords us no idea of any active power to move, and when set in motion, it is rather a passion than an action in it.

2. Susceptibility of impressions from external agents.

The differences of moldable and not moldable, &c., and many other passions of matter, are plebeian notions. [Little used.]

3. Suffering; emphatically, the last suffering of the Savior.

To whom also he showed himself alive after his passion, by many infallible proofs. Acts 1.

4. The feeling of the mind, or the sensible effect of impression; excitement, perturbation or agitation of mind; as desire, fear, hope,joy, grief,love, hatred. The eloquence of the orator is employed to move the passions.

5. Violent agitation or excitement of mind, particularly such as is occasioned by an offense, injury or insult; hence, violent anger.

6. Zeal; ardor; vehement desire.

When statesmen are ruled by faction and interest, they can have no passion for the glory of their country.

7. Love.

He owned his passion for Amestris.

8. Eager desire; as a violent passion for fine clothes.

PAS'SION, v.i. To be extremely agitated. [Not used.]




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [passion]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

PAS'SION, n. [L. passio, from patior, to suffer.]

1. The impression or effect of an external agent upon a body; that which is suffered or received.

A body at rest affords us no idea of any active power to move, and when set in motion, it is rather a passion than an action in it.

2. Susceptibility of impressions from external agents.

The differences of moldable and not moldable, &c., and many other passions of matter, are plebeian notions. [Little used.]

3. Suffering; emphatically, the last suffering of the Savior.

To whom also he showed himself alive after his passion, by many infallible proofs. Acts 1.

4. The feeling of the mind, or the sensible effect of impression; excitement, perturbation or agitation of mind; as desire, fear, hope,joy, grief,love, hatred. The eloquence of the orator is employed to move the passions.

5. Violent agitation or excitement of mind, particularly such as is occasioned by an offense, injury or insult; hence, violent anger.

6. Zeal; ardor; vehement desire.

When statesmen are ruled by faction and interest, they can have no passion for the glory of their country.

7. Love.

He owned his passion for Amestris.

8. Eager desire; as a violent passion for fine clothes.

PAS'SION, v.i. To be extremely agitated. [Not used.]


PAS'SION, n. [L. passio, from patior, to suffer.]

  1. The impression or effect of an external agent upon a body; that which is suffered or received. A body at rest affords us no idea of any active power to move, and when set in motion, it is rather a passion than an action in it. – Locke.
  2. Susceptibility of impressions from external agents. The differences of moldable and not moldable, &c., and many other passions of matter, are plebeian notions. [Little used.] – Bacon.
  3. Suffering; emphatically, the last suffering of the Savior. To whom also he showed himself alive after his passion, by many infallible proofs. – Acts i.
  4. The feeling of the mind, or the sensible effect of impression; excitement, perturbation or agitation of mind; as desire, fear, hope, joy, grief, love, hatred. The eloquence of the orator is employed to move the passions.
  5. Violent agitation or excitement of mind, particularly such as is occasioned by an offense, injury or insult; hence, violent anger. – Watts.
  6. Zeal; ardor; vehement desire. When statesmen are ruled by faction and interest, they can have no passion for the glory of their country. – Addison.
  7. Love. He owned his passion for Amestris. – Rowe.
  8. Eager desire; as, a violent passion for fine clothes. – Swift.

PAS'SION, v.i.

To be extremely agitated. [Not used.] – Shak.


Pas"sion
  1. A suffering or enduring of imposed or inflicted pain; any suffering or distress (as, a cardiac passion); specifically, the suffering of Christ between the time of the last supper and his death, esp. in the garden upon the cross.

    "The passions of this time." Wyclif (Rom. viii. 18).

    To whom also he showed himself alive after his passion, by many infallible proofs. Acts i. 3.

  2. To give a passionate character to.

    [R.] Keats.
  3. To suffer pain or sorrow] to experience a passion; to be extremely agitated.

    [Obs.] "Dumbly she passions, frantically she doteth." Shak.
  4. The state of being acted upon; subjection to an external agent or influence; a passive condition; -- opposed to action.

    A body at rest affords us no idea of any active power to move, and, when set is motion, it is rather a passion than an action in it. Locke.

  5. Capacity of being affected by external agents; susceptibility of impressions from external agents.

    [R.]

    Moldable and not moldable, scissible and not scissible, and many other passions of matter. Bacon.

  6. The state of the mind when it is powerfully acted upon and influenced by something external to itself; the state of any particular faculty which, under such conditions, becomes extremely sensitive or uncontrollably excited; any emotion or sentiment (specifically, love or anger) in a state of abnormal or controlling activity; an extreme or inordinate desire; also, the capacity or susceptibility of being so affected; as, to be in a passion; the passions of love, hate, jealously, wrath, ambition, avarice, fear, etc.; a passion for war, or for drink; an orator should have passion as well as rhetorical skill.

    "A passion fond even to idolatry." Macaulay. "Her passion is to seek roses." Lady M. W. Montagu.

    We also are men of like passions with you. Acts xiv. 15.

    The nature of the human mind can not be sufficiently understood, without considering the affections and passions, or those modifications or actions of the mind consequent upon the apprehension of certain objects or events in which the mind generally conceives good or evil. Hutcheson.

    The term passion, and its adverb passionately, often express a very strong predilection for any pursuit, or object of taste -- a kind of enthusiastic fondness for anything. Cogan.

    The bravery of his grief did put me
    Into a towering passion.
    Shak.

    The ruling passion, be it what it will,
    The ruling passion conquers reason still.
    Pope.

    Who walked in every path of human life,
    Felt every passion.
    Akenside.

    When statesmen are ruled by faction and interest, they can have no passion for the glory of their country. Addison.

  7. Disorder of the mind; madness.

    [Obs.] Shak.
  8. Passion week. See Passion week, below.

    R. of Gl.

    Passion flower (Bot.), any flower or plant of the genus Passiflora; -- so named from a fancied resemblance of parts of the flower to the instruments of our Savior's crucifixion.

    * The flowers are showy, and the fruit is sometimes highly esteemed (see Granadilla, and Maypop). The roots and leaves are generally more or less noxious, and are used in medicine. The plants are mostly tendril climbers, and are commonest in the warmer parts of America, though a few species are Asiatic or Australian.

    Passion music (Mus.), originally, music set to the gospel narrative of the passion of our Lord; after the Reformation, a kind of oratorio, with narrative, chorals, airs, and choruses, having for its theme the passion and crucifixion of Christ. -- Passion play, a mystery play, in which the scenes connected with the passion of our Savior are represented dramatically. -- Passion Sunday (Eccl.), the fifth Sunday in Lent, or the second before Easter. -- Passion Week, the last week but one in Lent, or the second week preceding Easter. "The name of Passion week is frequently, but improperly, applied to Holy Week." Shipley.

    Syn. -- Passion, Feeling, Emotion. When any feeling or emotion completely masters the mind, we call it a passion; as, a passion for music, dress, etc.; especially is anger (when thus extreme) called passion. The mind, in such cases, is considered as having lost its self- control, and become the passive instrument of the feeling in question.

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Passion

PAS'SION, noun [Latin passio, from patior, to suffer.]

1. The impression or effect of an external agent upon a body; that which is suffered or received.

A body at rest affords us no idea of any active power to move, and when set in motion, it is rather a passion than an action in it.

2. Susceptibility of impressions from external agents.

The differences of moldable and not moldable, etc., and many other passions of matter, are plebeian notions. [Little used.]

3. Suffering; emphatically, the last suffering of the Savior.

To whom also he showed himself alive after his passion by many infallible proofs. Acts 1:3.

4. The feeling of the mind, or the sensible effect of impression; excitement, perturbation or agitation of mind; as desire, fear, hope, joy, grief, love, hatred. The eloquence of the orator is employed to move the passions.

5. Violent agitation or excitement of mind, particularly such as is occasioned by an offense, injury or insult; hence, violent anger.

6. Zeal; ardor; vehement desire.

When statesmen are ruled by faction and interest, they can have no passion for the glory of their country.

7. Love.

He owned his passion for Amestris.

8. Eager desire; as a violent passion for fine clothes.

PAS'SION, verb intransitive To be extremely agitated. [Not used.]

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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