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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [passage]

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passage

P`ASSAGE, n.

1. The act of passing or moving by land or water, or through the air or other substance; as the passage of a man or a carriage; the passage of a ship or a fowl; the passage of light or a meteor; the passage of fluids through the pores of the body, or from the glands. Clouds intercept the passage of solar rays.

2. The time of passing from one place to another. What passage had you? We had a passage of twenty five days to Havre de Grace, and of thirty eight days from England.

3. Road; way; avenue; a place where men or things may pass or be conveyed.

And with his pointed dart,

Explores the nearest passage to this heart.

4. Entrance or exit.

What! are my doors opposed against my passage?

5. Right of passing; as, to engage a passage on board a ship bound to India.

6. Occurrence; event; incident; that which happens; as a remarkable passage in the life of Newton. [See the Spanish verb, supra. This sense is obsolescent.]

7. A passing away; decay. [Little used.]

8. Intellectual admittance; mental reception.

Among whom I expect this treatise will have a fairer passage than among those deeply imbued with other principles.

9. Manner of being conducted; management.

On consideration of the conduct and passage of affairs in former times--

10. Part of a book or writing; a single clause, place or part of indefinite extent.

How commentators each dark passage shun.

11. Enactment; the act of carrying through all the regular forms necessary to give validity; as the passage of a law, or of a bill into a law, by a legislative body.

Bird of passage, a fowl that passes at certain seasons from one climate to another, as in autumn to the south to avoid the winter's cold, and in spring to the north for breeding. Hence the phrase is sometimes applied to a man who has no fixed residence.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [passage]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

P`ASSAGE, n.

1. The act of passing or moving by land or water, or through the air or other substance; as the passage of a man or a carriage; the passage of a ship or a fowl; the passage of light or a meteor; the passage of fluids through the pores of the body, or from the glands. Clouds intercept the passage of solar rays.

2. The time of passing from one place to another. What passage had you? We had a passage of twenty five days to Havre de Grace, and of thirty eight days from England.

3. Road; way; avenue; a place where men or things may pass or be conveyed.

And with his pointed dart,

Explores the nearest passage to this heart.

4. Entrance or exit.

What! are my doors opposed against my passage?

5. Right of passing; as, to engage a passage on board a ship bound to India.

6. Occurrence; event; incident; that which happens; as a remarkable passage in the life of Newton. [See the Spanish verb, supra. This sense is obsolescent.]

7. A passing away; decay. [Little used.]

8. Intellectual admittance; mental reception.

Among whom I expect this treatise will have a fairer passage than among those deeply imbued with other principles.

9. Manner of being conducted; management.

On consideration of the conduct and passage of affairs in former times--

10. Part of a book or writing; a single clause, place or part of indefinite extent.

How commentators each dark passage shun.

11. Enactment; the act of carrying through all the regular forms necessary to give validity; as the passage of a law, or of a bill into a law, by a legislative body.

Bird of passage, a fowl that passes at certain seasons from one climate to another, as in autumn to the south to avoid the winter's cold, and in spring to the north for breeding. Hence the phrase is sometimes applied to a man who has no fixed residence.


PASS'AGE, n. [Fr. passage; Sp. pasage; It. passaggio.]

  1. The act of passing or moving by land or water, or through the air or other substance; as, the passage of a man or a carriage; the passage of a ship or a fowl; the passage of light or a meteor; the passage of fluids through the pores of the body, or from the glands. Clouds intercept the passage of solar rays.
  2. The time of passing from one place to another. What passage had you? We had a passage of twenty-five day to Havre de Grace, and of thirty-eight days from England.
  3. Road; way; avenue; a place where men or things may pass or be conveyed. – Temple. And with his pointed dart / Explore the nearest passage to his heart. – Dryden.
  4. Entrance or exit. What are my doors opposed against my passage? – Shak.
  5. Right of passing; as, to engage a passage on board a ship bound to India.
  6. Occurrence; event; incident; that which happens; as a remarkable passage in the life of Newton. [See the Spanish verb, supra. This sense is obsolescent.]
  7. A passing away; decay. [Little used.] – Shak.
  8. Intellectual admittance; mental reception. Among whom I expect this treatise will have a fairer passage than among those deeply imbued with other principles. – Digby.
  9. Manner of being conducted; management. On consideration of the conduct and passage of affairs in former times. – Davies.
  10. Part of a book or writing; a single clause, place or part of indefinite extent. How commentators each dark passage shun. – Young.
  11. Enactment; the act of carrying through all the regular forms necessary to give validity; as, the passage of a law or of a bill into a law, by a legislative body. – Hopkinson. Wheaton's Rep. His agency in procuring the passage of the stamp act was more than suspected. – Hosack.
  12. Home or entrance into a house. Bird of passage, a fowl that passes at certain seasons from one climate to another, as in autumn to the south to avoid the winter's cold, and in spring to the north for breeding. Hence the phrase is sometimes applied to a man who has no fixed residence.

Pas"sage
  1. The act of passing; transit from one place to another; movement from point to point; a going by, over, across, or through; as, the passage of a man or a carriage; the passage of a ship or a bird; the passage of light; the passage of fluids through the pores or channels of the body.

    What! are my doors opposed against my passage! Shak.

  2. Transit by means of conveyance; journey, as by water, carriage, car, or the like; travel; right, liberty, or means, of passing; conveyance.

    The ship in which he had taken passage. Macaulay.

  3. Price paid for the liberty to pass; fare; as, to pay one's passage.
  4. Removal from life; decease; departure; death.

    [R.] "Endure thy mortal passage." Milton.

    When he is fit and season'd for his passage. Shak.

  5. Way; road; path; channel or course through or by which one passes; way of exit or entrance; way of access or transit. Hence, a common avenue to various apartments in a building; a hall; a corridor.

    And with his pointed dart
    Explores the nearest passage to his heart.
    Dryden.

    The Persian army had advanced into the . . . passages of Cilicia. South.

  6. A continuous course, process, or progress; a connected or continuous series; as, the passage of time.

    The conduct and passage of affairs. Sir J. Davies.

    The passage and whole carriage of this action. Shak.

  7. A separate part of a course, process, or series; an occurrence; an incident; an act or deed.

    "In thy passages of life." Shak.

    The . . . almost incredible passage of their unbelief. South.

  8. A particular portion constituting a part of something continuous; esp., a portion of a book, speech, or musical composition; a paragraph; a clause.

    How commentators each dark passage shun. Young.

  9. Reception; currency.

    [Obs.] Sir K. Digby.
  10. A pass or en encounter; as, a passage at arms.

    No passages of love
    Betwixt us twain henceforward evermore.
    Tennyson.

  11. A movement or an evacuation of the bowels.
  12. In parliamentary proceedings: (a) The course of a proposition (bill, resolution, etc.) through the several stages of consideration and action; as, during its passage through Congress the bill was amended in both Houses. (b) The advancement of a bill or other proposition from one stage to another by an affirmative vote; esp., the final affirmative action of the body upon a proposition; hence, adoption; enactment; as, the passage of the bill to its third reading was delayed.

    "The passage of the Stamp Act." D. Hosack.

    The final question was then put upon its passage. Cushing.

    In passage, in passing; cursorily. "These . . . have been studied but in passage." Bacon. - - Middle passage, Northeast passage, Northwest passage. See under Middle, Northeast, etc. -- Of passage, passing from one place, region, or climate, to another; migratory; -- said especially of birds. "Birds of passage." Longfellow. -- Passage hawk, a hawk taken on its passage or migration. -- Passage money, money paid for conveyance of a passenger, -- usually for carrying passengers by water.

    Syn. -- Vestibule; hall; corridor. See Vestibule.

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Passage

P'ASSAGE, noun

1. The act of passing or moving by land or water, or through the air or other substance; as the passage of a man or a carriage; the passage of a ship or a fowl; the passage of light or a meteor; the passage of fluids through the pores of the body, or from the glands. Clouds intercept the passage of solar rays.

2. The time of passing from one place to another. What passage had you? We had a passage of twenty five days to Havre de Grace, and of thirty eight days from England.

3. Road; way; avenue; a place where men or things may pass or be conveyed.

And with his pointed dart,

Explores the nearest passage to this heart.

4. Entrance or exit.

What! are my doors opposed against my passage?

5. Right of passing; as, to engage a passage on board a ship bound to India.

6. Occurrence; event; incident; that which happens; as a remarkable passage in the life of Newton. [See the Spanish verb, supra. This sense is obsolescent.]

7. A passing away; decay. [Little used.]

8. Intellectual admittance; mental reception.

Among whom I expect this treatise will have a fairer passage than among those deeply imbued with other principles.

9. Manner of being conducted; management.

On consideration of the conduct and passage of affairs in former times--

10. Part of a book or writing; a single clause, place or part of indefinite extent.

How commentators each dark passage shun.

11. Enactment; the act of carrying through all the regular forms necessary to give validity; as the passage of a law, or of a bill into a law, by a legislative body.

Bird of passage a fowl that passes at certain seasons from one climate to another, as in autumn to the south to avoid the winter's cold, and in spring to the north for breeding. Hence the phrase is sometimes applied to a man who has no fixed residence.

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Because Noah Webster used the Bible as the basis for understanding the meaning of words. I use this to help in the preparation of Bible study notes

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

punctuation

PUNCTUA'TION, n. In grammar, the act or art of pointing a writing or discourse, or the act or art of marking with points the divisions of a discourse into sentences and clauses or members of a sentence. Punctuation is performed by four points, the period (.); the colon (:); the semicolon ( ;); and the comma (,). The ancients were unacquainted with punctuation; they wrote without any distinction of members, period or words.

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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