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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [palm]

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palm

PALM, n. p`am.. [L. palma.]

1. The inner part of the hand.

2. A hand or hand's breadth; a lineal measure of three inches.

3. The broad triangular part of an anchor at the end of the arms.

4. The name of many species of plants, but particularly of the date-tree or great palm, a native of Asia and Africa.

The palms constitute a natural order of monocotyledonous plants,with a simple cylindric stem, terminating in a crown of leaves or fronds, within which rises a tuft of flowers and fruits; all natives of warm climates. They vary in size from 2 to more than 100 feet in highth.

5. Branches of the palm being worn in token of victory, hence the word signifies superiority, victory, triumph. The palm was adopted as an emblem of victory, it is said, because the tree is so elastic as when pressed, to rise and recover its correct position.

Namur subdued is England's palm alone.

6. Among seamen, an instrument used in sewing canvas instead of a thimble.

PALM, v.t. p`am. To conceal in the palm of the hand.

They palmed the trick that lost the game.

1. To impose by fraud.

For you may palm upon us new for old.

2. To handle.

3. To stroke with the hand.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [palm]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

PALM, n. p`am.. [L. palma.]

1. The inner part of the hand.

2. A hand or hand's breadth; a lineal measure of three inches.

3. The broad triangular part of an anchor at the end of the arms.

4. The name of many species of plants, but particularly of the date-tree or great palm, a native of Asia and Africa.

The palms constitute a natural order of monocotyledonous plants,with a simple cylindric stem, terminating in a crown of leaves or fronds, within which rises a tuft of flowers and fruits; all natives of warm climates. They vary in size from 2 to more than 100 feet in highth.

5. Branches of the palm being worn in token of victory, hence the word signifies superiority, victory, triumph. The palm was adopted as an emblem of victory, it is said, because the tree is so elastic as when pressed, to rise and recover its correct position.

Namur subdued is England's palm alone.

6. Among seamen, an instrument used in sewing canvas instead of a thimble.

PALM, v.t. p`am. To conceal in the palm of the hand.

They palmed the trick that lost the game.

1. To impose by fraud.

For you may palm upon us new for old.

2. To handle.

3. To stroke with the hand.

PALM, n. [p'am; L. palma; W. palv; from spreading.]

  1. The inner part of the hand.
  2. A hand or hand's breadth; a lineal measure of three inches. – Holder. Bacon.
  3. The broad triangular part of an anchor at the end of the arms.
  4. The name of many species of plants, but particularly of the date-tree or great palm, a native of Asia and Africa. The palms constitute a natural order of monocotyledonous plants, with a simple cylindric stem, terminating in a crown of leaves, within which rises a tuft of flowers and fruits; all natives of warm climates. They vary in size from 2 to more than 100 feet in highth. – Jussieu. Linnæus.
  5. Branches of the palm being worn in token of victory, hence the word signifies superiority, victory, triumph. The palm was adopted as an emblem of victory, it is said, because the tree is so elastic as when pressed, to rise and recover its correct position. – Encyc. Namur subdued is England's palm alone. – Dryden.
  6. Among seamen, an instrument used in sewing canvas instead of a thimble.

PALM, v.t. [p'am.]

  1. To conceal in the palm of the hand. They palmed the trick that lost the game. – Prior.
  2. To impose by fraud. For you may palm upon us new for old. – Dryden.
  3. To handle. – Prior.
  4. To stroke with the hand. – Ainsworth.

Palm
  1. The inner and somewhat concave part of the hand between the bases of the fingers and the wrist.

    Clench'd her fingers till they bit the palm. Tennyson.

  2. Any endogenous tree of the order Palmæ or Palmaceæ; a palm tree.

    * Palms are perennial woody plants, often of majestic size. The trunk is usually erect and rarely branched, and has a roughened exterior composed of the persistent bases of the leaf stalks. The leaves are borne in a terminal crown, and are supported on stout, sheathing, often prickly, petioles. They are usually of great size, and are either pinnately or palmately many-cleft. There are about one thousand species known, nearly all of them growing in tropical or semitropical regions. The wood, petioles, leaves, sap, and fruit of many species are invaluable in the arts and in domestic economy. Among the best known are the date palm, the cocoa palm, the fan palm, the oil palm, the wax palm, the palmyra, and the various kinds called cabbage palm and palmetto.

  3. To handle.

    [Obs.] Prior.
  4. To "grease the palm" of; to bribe or tip.

    [Slang]
  5. A lineal measure equal either to the breadth of the hand or to its length from the wrist to the ends of the fingers; a hand; -- used in measuring a horse's height.

    * In Greece, the palm was reckoned at three inches. The Romans adopted two measures of this name, the lesser palm of 2.91 inches, and the greater palm of 8.73 inches. At the present day, this measure varies in the most arbitrary manner, being different in each country, and occasionally varying in the same. Internat. Cyc.

  6. A branch or leaf of the palm, anciently borne or worn as a symbol of victory or rejoicing.

    A great multitude . . . stood before the throne, and before the Lamb, clothed with white robes, and palme in their hands. Rev. vii. 9.

  7. To manipulate with, or conceal in, the palm of the hand] to juggle.

    They palmed the trick that lost the game. Prior.

  8. A metallic disk, attached to a strap, and worn the palm of the hand, -- used to push the needle through the canvas, in sewing sails, etc.
  9. Any symbol or token of superiority, success, or triumph; also, victory; triumph; supremacy.

    "The palm of martyrdom." Chaucer.

    So get the start of the majestic world
    And bear the palm alone.
    Shak.

    Molucca palm (Bot.), a labiate herb from Asia (Molucella lævis), having a curious cup-shaped calyx. -- Palm cabbage, the terminal bud of a cabbage palm, used as food. -- Palm cat (Zoöl.), the common paradoxure. -- Palm crab (Zoöl.), the purse crab. -- Palm oil, a vegetable oil, obtained from the fruit of several species of palms, as the African oil palm (Elæis Guineensis), and used in the manufacture of soap and candles. See Elæis. -- Palm swift (Zoöl.), a small swift (Cypselus Batassiensis) which frequents the palmyra and cocoanut palms in India. Its peculiar nest is attached to the leaf of the palmyra palm. -- Palm toddy. Same as Palm wine. -- Palm weevil (Zoöl.), any one of mumerous species of very large weevils of the genus Rhynchophorus. The larvæ bore into palm trees, and are called palm borers, and grugru worms. They are considered excellent food. -- Palm wine, the sap of several species of palms, especially, in India, of the wild date palm (Phœnix sylvestrix), the palmyra, and the Caryota urens. When fermented it yields by distillation arrack, and by evaporation jaggery. Called also palm toddy. -- Palm worm, or Palmworm. (Zoöl.) (a) The larva of a palm weevil. (b) A centipede.

  10. To impose by fraud, as by sleight of hand; to put by unfair means; -- usually with off.

    For you may palm upon us new for old. Dryden.

  11. The broad flattened part of an antler, as of a full-grown fallow deer; -- so called as resembling the palm of the hand with its protruding fingers.
  12. The flat inner face of an anchor fluke.
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Palm

PALM, noun p'am.. [Latin palma.]

1. The inner part of the hand.

2. A hand or hand's breadth; a lineal measure of three inches.

3. The broad triangular part of an anchor at the end of the arms.

4. The name of many species of plants, but particularly of the date-tree or great palm a native of Asia and Africa.

The palms constitute a natural order of monocotyledonous plants, with a simple cylindric stem, terminating in a crown of leaves or fronds, within which rises a tuft of flowers and fruits; all natives of warm climates. They vary in size from 2 to more than 100 feet in highth.

5. Branches of the palm being worn in token of victory, hence the word signifies superiority, victory, triumph. The palm was adopted as an emblem of victory, it is said, because the tree is so elastic as when pressed, to rise and recover its correct position.

Namur subdued is England's palm alone.

6. Among seamen, an instrument used in sewing canvas instead of a thimble.

PALM, verb transitive p'am. To conceal in the palm of the hand.

They palmed the trick that lost the game.

1. To impose by fraud.

For you may palm upon us new for old.

2. To handle.

3. To stroke with the hand.

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It is important to me because, it was written by a Christian man, who also, with the definition gave scriptural quotes to each and every word...

— Doug (Lemon Grove, CA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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scovel

SCO'VEL, n. [L. scopa.]

A mop for sweeping ovens; a maulkin.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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