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Saturday - February 23, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [orator]

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orator

OR'ATOR, n. [L.]

1. A public speaker. In ancient Rome, orators were advocates for clients in the forum and before the senate and people. They were employed in causes of importance instead of the common patron.

2. In modern usage, a person who pronounces a discourse publicly on some special occasion, as on the celebration of some memorable event.

3. An eloquent public speaker; a speaker, by way of eminence. We say, a man writes and reasons well, but is no orator. Lord Chatham was an orator.

4. In France, a speaker in debate in a legislative body.

5. In chancery, a petitioner.

6. An officer in the universities in England.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [orator]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

OR'ATOR, n. [L.]

1. A public speaker. In ancient Rome, orators were advocates for clients in the forum and before the senate and people. They were employed in causes of importance instead of the common patron.

2. In modern usage, a person who pronounces a discourse publicly on some special occasion, as on the celebration of some memorable event.

3. An eloquent public speaker; a speaker, by way of eminence. We say, a man writes and reasons well, but is no orator. Lord Chatham was an orator.

4. In France, a speaker in debate in a legislative body.

5. In chancery, a petitioner.

6. An officer in the universities in England.

OR'A-TOR, n. [L.]

  1. A public speaker. In ancient Rome, orators were advocates for clients in the forum and before the senate and people. They were employed in causes of importance instead of the common patron. Encyc.
  2. In modern usage, a person who pronounces a discourse publicly on some special occasion, as on the celebration of some memorable event.
  3. An eloquent public speaker; a speaker, by way of eminence. We say, a man writes and reasons well, but is no orator. Lord Chatham was an orator.
  4. In France, a speaker in debate in a legislative body.
  5. In chancery, a petitioner.
  6. An officer in the universities in England.

Or"a*tor
  1. A public speaker; one who delivers an oration; especially, one distinguished for his skill and power as a public speaker; one who is eloquent.

    I am no orator, as Brutus is. Shak.

    Some orator renowned
    In Athens or free Rome.
    Milton.

  2. In equity proceedings, one who prays for relief; a petitioner.

    (b)
  3. An officer who is the voice of the university upon all public occasions, who writes, reads, and records all letters of a public nature, presents, with an appropriate address, those persons on whom honorary degrees are to be conferred, and performs other like duties; -- called also public orator.
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Orator

OR'ATOR, noun [Latin]

1. A public speaker. In ancient Rome, orators were advocates for clients in the forum and before the senate and people. They were employed in causes of importance instead of the common patron.

2. In modern usage, a person who pronounces a discourse publicly on some special occasion, as on the celebration of some memorable event.

3. An eloquent public speaker; a speaker, by way of eminence. We say, a man writes and reasons well, but is no orator Lord Chatham was an orator

4. In France, a speaker in debate in a legislative body.

5. In chancery, a petitioner.

6. An officer in the universities in England.

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— Tim (Corvallis, OR)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

can

CAN, n. A cup or vessel for liquors, in modern times made of metal; as a can of ale.

CAN, v.i. pret. could, which is from another root. [See Could.]

1. To be able; to have sufficient strength or physical power. One man can lift a weight which another can not. A horse can run a certain distance in a given time.

2. To have means, or instruments, which supply power or ability. A man can build a house, or fit out a ship, if he has the requisite property. A nation cannot prosecute a war, without money or credit. I will lend you a thousand dollars, if I can.

3. To be possible.

Nicodemus said, How can these thing be? John 3.

4. To have adequate moral power. A man can indulge in pleasure, or he can refrain. He can restrain his appetites, if he will.

5. To have just or legal competent power, that is, right; to be free from any restraint of moral, civil or political obligation, or from any positive prohibition. We can use a highway for travel, for this is permitted by law. A man can or cannot hold an office. The Jews could not eat certain kinds of animals which were declared to be unclean. The House of Commons in England can impeach, but the House of Lords only can try impeachments. In general, we can do whatever neither the laws of God nor of man forbid.

How can I do this great wickedness and sin against God. Gen. 34.

I cannot go beyond the word of the Lord, my God, to do less or more. Numb. 22.

6. To have natural strength, or capacity; to be susceptible of; to be able or free to undergo any change, or produce any effect, by the laws and constitution of nature, or by divine appointment. Silver can be melted, but cannot be changed into gold.

Can the rush grow without mire? Job 8.

Can the fig tree bear olive berries? James 3.

Can faith save him? James 2.

7. To have competent strength, ability, fortitude, patience, &c., in a passive sense. He cannot bear reproof. I cannot endure this impertinence.

This is a hard saying; who can hear it? John 6.

8. To have the requisite knowledge, experience or skill. Young men are not admitted members of college, till they can translate Latin and Greek. An astronomer can calculate an eclipse, though he can not make a coat.

9. To have strength of inclination or motives sufficient to overcome obstacles, impediments, inconvenience or other objection.

I have married a wife, and therefore I cannot come. Luke 9.

I cannot rise and give thee - yet because of him importunity, he will rise and give him. Luke 9.

10. To have sufficient capacity; as, a vessel can not hold or contain the whole quantity.

CAN, v.t. To know.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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