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Tuesday - December 18, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [oil]

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oil

OIL, n. It seems to be named from its inflammability, for aelan, is to kindle, and to oil; hence anaelan, to anneal; aeled, fire. L. oleum; Gr.]

An unctuous substance expressed or drawn from several animal and vegetable substances. The distinctive characters of oil are inflammability, fluidity, and insolubility in water. Oils are fixed or fat, and volatile or essential. They have a smooth feel, and most of them have little taste or smell. Animal oil is found in all animal substances. Vegetable oils are produced by expression, infusion or distillation.

OIL, v.t. To smear or rub over with oil; to lubricate with oil; to anoint with oil.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [oil]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

OIL, n. It seems to be named from its inflammability, for aelan, is to kindle, and to oil; hence anaelan, to anneal; aeled, fire. L. oleum; Gr.]

An unctuous substance expressed or drawn from several animal and vegetable substances. The distinctive characters of oil are inflammability, fluidity, and insolubility in water. Oils are fixed or fat, and volatile or essential. They have a smooth feel, and most of them have little taste or smell. Animal oil is found in all animal substances. Vegetable oils are produced by expression, infusion or distillation.

OIL, v.t. To smear or rub over with oil; to lubricate with oil; to anoint with oil.


OIL, n. [Sax. æl. It seems to be named from its inflammability, for ælan, is to kindle, and to oil; hence anælan, to anneal; æled, fire; Dan. ild, whence the name of Hildebrand, D. Ildebrand, fire-brand; D. oly; G. oel; Sw. olja; Dan. olie; Fr. huile; It. olio; L. oleum; Gr. ελαιον; W. olew; Ir. ola; Arm. Sp. and Port. oleo.]

An unctuous substance expressed or drawn from several animal and vegetable substances. The distinctive characters of oil are inflammability, fluidity and insolubility in water. Oils are fixed and greasy, fixed and essential, volatile and essential. They have a smooth feel, and most of them have little taste or smell. Animal oil is found in all animal substances. Vegetable oils are produced by expression, infusion or distillation. Encyc. Nicholson.


OIL, v.t.

To smear or rub over with oil; to lubricate with oil; to anoint with oil. Wotton. Swift.


Oil
  1. Any one of a great variety of unctuous combustible substances, not miscible with water; as, olive oil, whale oil, rock oil, etc. They are of animal, vegetable, or mineral origin and of varied composition, and they are variously used for food, for solvents, for anointing, lubrication, illumination, etc. By extension, any substance of an oily consistency; as, oil of vitriol.

    * The mineral oils are varieties of petroleum. See Petroleum. The vegetable oils are of two classes, essential oils (see under Essential), and natural oils which in general resemble the animal oils and fats. Most of the natural oils and the animal oils and fats consist of ethereal salts of glycerin, with a large number of organic acids, principally stearic, oleic, and palmitic, forming respectively stearin, olein, and palmitin. Stearin and palmitin prevail in the solid oils and fats, and olein in the liquid oils. Mutton tallow, beef tallow, and lard are rich in stearin, human fat and palm oil in palmitin, and sperm and cod-liver oils in olein. In making soaps, the acids leave the glycerin and unite with the soda or potash.

    Animal oil, Bone oil, Dipple's oil, etc. (Old Chem.), a complex oil obtained by the distillation of animal substances, as bones. See Bone oil, under Bone. -- Drying oils, Essential oils. (Chem.) See under Drying, and Essential. -- Ethereal oil of wine, Heavy oil of wine. (Chem.) See under Ethereal. -- Fixed oil. (Chem.) See under Fixed. -- Oil bag (Zoöl.), a bag, cyst, or gland in animals, containing oil. -- Oil beetle (Zoöl.), any beetle of the genus Meloe and allied genera. When disturbed they emit from the joints of the legs a yellowish oily liquor. Some species possess vesicating properties, and are used instead of cantharides. -- Oil box, or Oil cellar (Mach.), a fixed box or reservoir, for lubricating a bearing; esp., the box for oil beneath the journal of a railway-car axle. -- Oil cake. See under Cake. -- Oil cock, a stopcock connected with an oil cup. See Oil cup. -- Oil color. (a) A paint made by grinding a coloring substance in oil. (b) Such paints, taken in a general sense. -- Oil cup, a cup, or small receptacle, connected with a bearing as a lubricator, and usually provided with a wick, wire, or adjustable valve for regulating the delivery of oil. -- Oil engine, a gas engine worked with the explosive vapor of petroleum. - - Oil gas, inflammable gas procured from oil, and used for lighting streets, houses, etc. -- Oil gland. (a) (Zoöl.) A gland which secretes oil; especially in birds, the large gland at the base of the tail. (b) (Bot.) A gland, in some plants, producing oil. -- Oil green, a pale yellowish green, like oil. -- Oil of brick, empyreumatic oil obtained by subjecting a brick soaked in oil to distillation at a high temperature, -- used by lapidaries as a vehicle for the emery by which stones and gems are sawn or cut. Brande *** C. -- Oil of talc, a nostrum made of calcined talc, and famous in the 17th century as a cosmetic. [Obs.] B. Jonson. -- Oil of vitriol (Chem.), strong sulphuric acid] -- so called from its oily consistency and from its forming the vitriols or sulphates. -- Oil of wine, Œnanthic ether. See under Œnanthic. -- Oil painting. (a) The art of painting in oil colors. (b) Any kind of painting of which the pigments are originally ground in oil. -- Oil palm (Bot.), a palm tree whose fruit furnishes oil, esp. Elæis Guineensis. See Elæis. -- Oil sardine (Zoöl.), an East Indian herring (Clupea scombrina), valued for its oil. -- Oil shark (Zoöl.) (a) The liver shark. (b) The tope. -- Oil still, a still for hydrocarbons, esp. for petroleum. -- Oil test, a test for determining the temperature at which petroleum oils give off vapor which is liable to explode. -- Oil tree. (Bot.) (a) A plant of the genus Ricinus (R. communis), from the seeds of which castor oil is obtained. (b) An Indian tree, the mahwa. See Mahwa. (c) The oil palm. -- To burn the midnight oil, to study or work late at night. -- Volatle oils. See Essential oils, under Essential.

  2. To smear or rub over with oil] to lubricate with oil; to anoint with oil.
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Oil

OIL, noun It seems to be named from its inflammability, for aelan, is to kindle, and to oil; hence anaelan, to anneal; aeled, fire. Latin oleum; Gr.]

An unctuous substance expressed or drawn from several animal and vegetable substances. The distinctive characters of oil are inflammability, fluidity, and insolubility in water. Oils are fixed or fat, and volatile or essential. They have a smooth feel, and most of them have little taste or smell. Animal oil is found in all animal substances. Vegetable oils are produced by expression, infusion or distillation.

OIL, verb transitive To smear or rub over with oil; to lubricate with oil; to anoint with oil

OIL'-BAG, noun A bag, cyst or gland in animals containing oil

OIL'-COLOR, noun A color made by grinding a coloring substance in oil

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Words hold much power, if we don't know true meanings what we say/write is distorted and power lessens or is confused. This lack of understanding leads to lack of wisdom which is destructive to self and society.

— Frannia (East Stroudsburg, PA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

refresh

REFRESH', v.t. [See Fresh.]

1. To cool; to allay heat.

A dew coming after a heat refresheth.

2. To give new strength to; to invigorate; to relieve after fatigue; as, to refresh the body. A man or a beast is refreshed by food and rest. Ex. 23.

3. To revive; to reanimate after depression; to cheer; to enliven.

For they have refreshed my spirit and yours. 1Cor. 16.

4. To improve by new touches any thing impaired.

The rest refresh the scaly snakes.

5. To revive what is drooping; as, rain refreshes the plants.

REFRESH', n. Act of refreshing. [Not used.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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