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Tuesday - December 18, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [object]

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object

OB'JECT, n. [L. objectum, objectus. See the Verb.]

1. That about which any power or faculty is employed, or something apprehended or presented to the mind by sensation or imagination. Thus that quality of a rose which is perceived by the sense of smell, is an object of perception. When the object is not in contact with the organ of sense, there must be some medium through which we obtain the perception of it. The impression which objects make on the senses, must be by the immediate application of them to the organs of sense, or by means of the medium that intervenes between the organs and the objects.

2. That to which the mind is directed for accomplishment or attainment; end; ultimate purpose. Happiness is the object of every man's desires; we all strive to attain that object. Wealth and honor are pursued with eagerness as desirable objects.

3. Something presented to the senses or the mind, to excite emotion, affection or passion.

This passenger felt some degree of concern at the sight of so moving an object.

In this sense, the word uttered with a particular emphasis, signifies something that may strongly move our pity, abhorrence or disgust. What an object!

4. In grammar, that which is produced, influenced or acted on by something else; that which follows a transitive verb. When we say, "God created the world," world denotes the thing produced, and is the object after the verb created. When we say, "the light affects the eye," eye denotes that which is affected or acted on. When we say, "instruction directs the mind or opinions," mind and opinions," mind and opinions are the objects influenced.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [object]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

OB'JECT, n. [L. objectum, objectus. See the Verb.]

1. That about which any power or faculty is employed, or something apprehended or presented to the mind by sensation or imagination. Thus that quality of a rose which is perceived by the sense of smell, is an object of perception. When the object is not in contact with the organ of sense, there must be some medium through which we obtain the perception of it. The impression which objects make on the senses, must be by the immediate application of them to the organs of sense, or by means of the medium that intervenes between the organs and the objects.

2. That to which the mind is directed for accomplishment or attainment; end; ultimate purpose. Happiness is the object of every man's desires; we all strive to attain that object. Wealth and honor are pursued with eagerness as desirable objects.

3. Something presented to the senses or the mind, to excite emotion, affection or passion.

This passenger felt some degree of concern at the sight of so moving an object.

In this sense, the word uttered with a particular emphasis, signifies something that may strongly move our pity, abhorrence or disgust. What an object!

4. In grammar, that which is produced, influenced or acted on by something else; that which follows a transitive verb. When we say, "God created the world," world denotes the thing produced, and is the object after the verb created. When we say, "the light affects the eye," eye denotes that which is affected or acted on. When we say, "instruction directs the mind or opinions," mind and opinions," mind and opinions are the objects influenced.

OB-JECT', a.

Opposed; presented in opposition. [Not used.] Sandys.


OB'JECT, n. [Fr. objet; L. objectum, objectus. See the Verb.]

  1. That about which any power or faculty is employed, or something apprehended or presented to the mind by sensation or imagination. Thus that quality of a rose which is perceived by the sense of smell, is an object of perception. When the object is not in contact with the organ of sense, there must be some medium through which we obtain the perception of it. The impression which objects make on the senses, must be by the immediate application of them to the organs of sense, or by means of the medium that intervenes between the organs and the objects.
  2. That to which the mind is directed for accomplishment or attainment; end; ultimate purpose. Happiness is the object of every man's desires; we all strive to attain to that object. Wealth and honor are pursued with eagerness as desirable objects.
  3. Something presented to the senses or the mind, to excite emotion, affection or passion. This passenger felt some degree of concern at the sight of so moving an object. Atterbury. In this sense, the word uttered with a particular emphasis, signifies something that may strongly move our pity, abhorrence or disgust. What an object!
  4. In grammar, that which is produced, influenced or acted on by something else; that which follows a transitive verb. When we say, “God created the world,” world denotes the thing produced, and is the object after the verb created. When we say, “the light affects the eye,” eye denotes that which is affected or acted on. When we say, “instruction directs the mind or opinions,” mind and opinions are the objects influenced.

OB-JECT', v.i.

To oppose in words or arguments; to offer reasons against. The counsel objected to the admission of the plaintif's witnesses.


OB-JECT', v.t. [L. objicio; ob and jacio, to throw against.]

  1. To oppose; to, present in opposition. Pallas to their eyes / The mist objected, and condens'd the skies. Pope.
  2. To present or offer in opposition, as a charge criminal, or as a reason adverse to something supposed to be erroneous or wrong; with to or against. The book – giveth liberty to object any crime against such as are to be ordered. Whitgifte. The adversaries of religion object against professors the irregularity of their lives, and too often with justice. Anon. There was this single fault that Erasmus, though an enemy, could abject to him. Atterbury.
  3. To offer; to exhibit. [Little used.] Warburton.

Ob*ject"
  1. To set before or against; to bring into opposition; to oppose.

    [Obs.]

    Of less account some knight thereto object,
    Whose loss so great and harmful can not prove.
    Fairfax.

    Some strong impediment or other objecting itself. Hooker.

    Pallas to their eyes
    The mist objected, and condensed the skies.
    Pope.

  2. To make opposition in words or argument; -- usually followed by to.

    Sir. T. More.
  3. That which is put, or which may be regarded as put, in the way of some of the senses; something visible or tangible; as, he observed an object in the distance; all the objects in sight; he touched a strange object in the dark.
  4. Opposed; presented in opposition; also, exposed.

    [Obs.]
  5. To offer in opposition as a criminal charge or by way of accusation or reproach; to adduce as an objection or adverse reason.

    He gave to him to object his heinous crime. Spencer.

    Others object the poverty of the nation. Addison.

    The book . . . giveth liberty to object any crime against such as are to be ordered. Whitgift.

  6. That which is set, or which may be regarded as set, before the mind so as to be apprehended or known; that of which the mind by any of its activities takes cognizance, whether a thing external in space or a conception formed by the mind itself; as, an object of knowledge, wonder, fear, thought, study, etc.

    Object is a term for that about which the knowing subject is conversant; what the schoolmen have styled the "materia circa quam." Sir. W. Hamilton.

    The object of their bitterest hatred. Macaulay.

  7. That by which the mind, or any of its activities, is directed; that on which the purpose are fixed as the end of action or effort; that which is sought for; end; aim; motive; final cause.

    Object, beside its proper signification, came to be abusively applied to denote motive, end, final cause . . . . This innovation was probably borrowed from the French. Sir. W. Hamilton.

    Let our object be, our country, our whole country, and nothing but our country. D. Webster.

  8. Sight; show; appearance; aspect.

    [Obs.] Shak.

    He, advancing close
    Up to the lake, past all the rest, arose
    In glorious object.
    Chapman.

  9. A word, phrase, or clause toward which an action is directed, or is considered to be directed; as, the object of a transitive verb.

    Object glass, the lens, or system of lenses, placed at the end of a telescope, microscope, etc., which is toward the object. Its office is to form an image of the object, which is then viewed by the eyepiece. Called also objective. See Illust. of Microscope. -- Object lesson, a lesson in which object teaching is made use of. -- Object staff. (Leveling) Same as Leveling staff. -- Object teaching, a method of instruction, in which illustrative objects are employed, each new word or idea being accompanied by a representation of that which it signifies; -- used especially in the kindergarten, for young children.

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Object

OB'JECT, noun [Latin objectum, objectus. See the Verb.]

1. That about which any power or faculty is employed, or something apprehended or presented to the mind by sensation or imagination. Thus that quality of a rose which is perceived by the sense of smell, is an object of perception. When the object is not in contact with the organ of sense, there must be some medium through which we obtain the perception of it. The impression which objects make on the senses, must be by the immediate application of them to the organs of sense, or by means of the medium that intervenes between the organs and the objects.

2. That to which the mind is directed for accomplishment or attainment; end; ultimate purpose. Happiness is the object of every man's desires; we all strive to attain that object Wealth and honor are pursued with eagerness as desirable objects.

3. Something presented to the senses or the mind, to excite emotion, affection or passion.

This passenger felt some degree of concern at the sight of so moving an object

In this sense, the word uttered with a particular emphasis, signifies something that may strongly move our pity, abhorrence or disgust. What an object!

4. In grammar, that which is produced, influenced or acted on by something else; that which follows a transitive verb. When we say, 'God created the world, ' world denotes the thing produced, and is the object after the verb created. When we say, 'the light affects the eye, ' eye denotes that which is affected or acted on. When we say, 'instruction directs the mind or opinions, ' mind and opinions, ' mind and opinions are the objects influenced.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

wail

WAIL, v.t. To lament; to moan; to bewail.

Or if no more her absent lord she wails--

WAIL, v.i. To weep; to express sorrow audibly.

Therefore I will wail and howl. Micah 1.

WAIL, n. Loud weeping; violent lamentation.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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