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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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number

NUM'BER, n. [Probably the radical sense is to speak, name or tell, as our word tell, in the other dialects, is to number. Number may be allied to name, as the Spaniards use nombre for name, and the French word written with the same letters, is number.]

1. The designation of a unit reference to other units, or in reckoning, counting, enumerating; as, one is the first number; a simple number.

2. An assemblage of two or more units. Two is a number composed of one and one added. Five and three added make the number eight. Number may be applied to any collection or multitude of units or individuals, and therefore is indefinite, unless defined by other words or by figures or signs of definite signification. Hence,

3. More than one; many.

Ladies are always of great use to the party they espouse, and never fail to win over numbers.

4. Multitude.

Number itself importeth not much in armies, where the men are of weak courage.

5. In poetry, measure; the order and quantity of syllables constituting feet, which render verse musical to the ear. The harmony of verse consists in the proper distribution of the long and short syllables, with suitable pauses. In oratory, a judicious disposition of words, syllables and cadences constitutes a kind of measure resembling poetic numbers.

6. Poetry; verse.

I lisped in numbers, for the numbers came.

Here the first word numbers may be taken for poetry or verse, and the second for measure.

Yet shoud the Muses bid my numbers roll.

7. In grammar, the difference of termination or form of a word, to express unity or plurality. The termination which denotes one or an individual, is the singular number; the termination that denotes two or more individuals or units, constitues the plural number. Hence we say, a noun, an adjective, a pronoun or a verb is in the singular or the plural number.

8. In mathematics, number is variously distinguished. cardinal numbers are those which express the amount of units; as 1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10. Ordinal numbers are those which express order; as first, second, third, fourth, &c.

Determinate number, is that referred to a given unit, as a ternary or three; an indeterminate number, is referred to unity in general, and called quantity.

Homogeneal numbers, are those referred to the same units; those referred to different units are termed heterogeneal.

Whole numbers, are called integers.

A rational number, is one commensurable with unity. A number incommensurable with unity, is termed irrational or surd.

A prime or primitive number, is divisible only by unity; as three, five, seven, &c.

A perfect number, is that whose aliquot parts added together, make the whole number, as 28, whose aliquot parts, 14. 7. 4. 2. 1. make the number 28.

An imperfect number, is that whose aliquot parts added together, make more or less than the number. This is abundant or defedtive; abundant, as 12, whose aliquot parts, 6. 4. 3. 2. 1. make 16; or defective, as 16 whose aliquot parts, 8. 4. 2. 1. make 15 only.

A square number, is the product of a number multiplied by itself; as, 16 is the square number of four.

A cubic number, is the product of a square number by its root; as, 27 is the product of the square number 9 by its root 3.

Golden number, the cycle of the moon, or revolution of 19 years, in which time the conjunctions, oppositions and other aspects of the moon are nearly the same as they were on the same days of the month 19 years before.

NUM'BER, v.t.

1. To count; to reckon; to ascertain the units of any sum, collection or multitude.

If a man can number the dust of the earth, then shall thy seed also be numbered. Genesis 8.

2. To reckon as one of a collection or multitude.

He was numbered with the transgressors. Isaiah 53.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [number]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

NUM'BER, n. [Probably the radical sense is to speak, name or tell, as our word tell, in the other dialects, is to number. Number may be allied to name, as the Spaniards use nombre for name, and the French word written with the same letters, is number.]

1. The designation of a unit reference to other units, or in reckoning, counting, enumerating; as, one is the first number; a simple number.

2. An assemblage of two or more units. Two is a number composed of one and one added. Five and three added make the number eight. Number may be applied to any collection or multitude of units or individuals, and therefore is indefinite, unless defined by other words or by figures or signs of definite signification. Hence,

3. More than one; many.

Ladies are always of great use to the party they espouse, and never fail to win over numbers.

4. Multitude.

Number itself importeth not much in armies, where the men are of weak courage.

5. In poetry, measure; the order and quantity of syllables constituting feet, which render verse musical to the ear. The harmony of verse consists in the proper distribution of the long and short syllables, with suitable pauses. In oratory, a judicious disposition of words, syllables and cadences constitutes a kind of measure resembling poetic numbers.

6. Poetry; verse.

I lisped in numbers, for the numbers came.

Here the first word numbers may be taken for poetry or verse, and the second for measure.

Yet shoud the Muses bid my numbers roll.

7. In grammar, the difference of termination or form of a word, to express unity or plurality. The termination which denotes one or an individual, is the singular number; the termination that denotes two or more individuals or units, constitues the plural number. Hence we say, a noun, an adjective, a pronoun or a verb is in the singular or the plural number.

8. In mathematics, number is variously distinguished. cardinal numbers are those which express the amount of units; as 1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10. Ordinal numbers are those which express order; as first, second, third, fourth, &c.

Determinate number, is that referred to a given unit, as a ternary or three; an indeterminate number, is referred to unity in general, and called quantity.

Homogeneal numbers, are those referred to the same units; those referred to different units are termed heterogeneal.

Whole numbers, are called integers.

A rational number, is one commensurable with unity. A number incommensurable with unity, is termed irrational or surd.

A prime or primitive number, is divisible only by unity; as three, five, seven, &c.

A perfect number, is that whose aliquot parts added together, make the whole number, as 28, whose aliquot parts, 14. 7. 4. 2. 1. make the number 28.

An imperfect number, is that whose aliquot parts added together, make more or less than the number. This is abundant or defedtive; abundant, as 12, whose aliquot parts, 6. 4. 3. 2. 1. make 16; or defective, as 16 whose aliquot parts, 8. 4. 2. 1. make 15 only.

A square number, is the product of a number multiplied by itself; as, 16 is the square number of four.

A cubic number, is the product of a square number by its root; as, 27 is the product of the square number 9 by its root 3.

Golden number, the cycle of the moon, or revolution of 19 years, in which time the conjunctions, oppositions and other aspects of the moon are nearly the same as they were on the same days of the month 19 years before.

NUM'BER, v.t.

1. To count; to reckon; to ascertain the units of any sum, collection or multitude.

If a man can number the dust of the earth, then shall thy seed also be numbered. Genesis 8.

2. To reckon as one of a collection or multitude.

He was numbered with the transgressors. Isaiah 53.

NUM'BER, n. [Fr. nombre; L. numerus; It. Sp. and Port. numero; Arm. and W. niver; Ir. nuimhir. I know not whether the elements are Nm, or Nb. Probably the radical sense is to speak, name or tell, as our word tell, in the other dialects, is to number. Number may be allied to name, as the Spaniards use nombre for name, and the French word written with the same letters, is number. Class Nm, No. 1.]

  1. The designation of a unit in reference to other units, or in reckoning, counting, enumerating; as, one is the first number; a simple number.
  2. An assemblage of two or more units. Two is a number composed of one and one added. Five and three added make the number eight. Number may be applied to any collection or multitude of units or individuals, and therefore is indefinite, unless defined by other words or by figures or signs of definite signification. Hence,
  3. More than one; many. Ladies are always of great use to the party they espouse, and never fait to win over numbers. Addison.
  4. Multitude. Number itself importeth not much in armies, where the men are of weak courage. Bacon.
  5. In poetry, measure; the order and quantity of syllables constituting feet, which render verse musical to the ear. The harmony of verse consists in the proper distribution of the long and short syllables, with suitable pauses. In oratory, a judicious disposition of words, syllables and cadences constitutes a kind of measure resembling poetic numbers.
  6. Poetry; verse. I lisped in numbers, for the numbers came. Pope. Here the first word numbers may be taken for poetry or verse, and the second for measure. Yet should the Muses bid my numbers roll. Pope.
  7. In grammar, the difference of termination or form of a word, to express unity or plurality. The termination which denotes one or an individual, is the singular number; the termination that denotes two or more individuals or units, constitutes the plural number. Hence we say, a noun, an adjective, a pronoun or a verb is in the singular or the plural number.
  8. In mathematics, number is variously distinguished. Cardinal numbers are those which express the amount of units; as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. Ordinal numbers are-those which express order; as first, second, third, fourth, &c. Determinate number, is that referred to a given unit, as a ternary or three; an indeterminate number, is referred to unity in general, and called quantity. Homogeneal numbers, are those referred to the same units; those referred to different units are termed heterogeneal. Whole numbers, are called integers. A rational number, is one commensurable with unity. A number incommensurable with unity, is termed irrational or surd. A prime or primitive number, is divisible only by unity; as three, five, seven, &c. A perfect number, is that whose aliquot parts added together, make the whole number, as 28, whose aliquot parts, 14, 7, 4, 2, 1, make the number 28. An imperfect number, is that whose aliquot parts added together, make more or less than the number. This is abundant or defective; abundant, as 12, whose aliquot parts, 6, 4, 3, 2, 1, make 16; or defective, as 16, whose aliquot parts, 8, 4, 2, 1, make 15 only. A square number, is the product of a number multiplied by itself; as, 16 is the square number of 4. A cubic number, is the product of a square number by its root; as, 27 is the product of the square number 9 by its 3. Encyc. Golden number, the cycle of the moon, or revolution of 19 years, in which time the conjunctions, oppositions and other aspects of the moon are nearly the same as they were on the same days of the month 19 years before.

NUM'BER, v.t. [L. numero.]

  1. To count; to reckon; to ascertain the units of any sum, collection or multitude. If a man can number the dust of the earth, then shall thy seed also be numbered. Gen. xiii.
  2. To reckon as one of a collection or multitude. He was numbered with the transgressors. Is. liii.

Num"ber
  1. That which admits of being counted or reckoned; a unit, or an aggregate of units; a numerable aggregate or collection of individuals; an assemblage made up of distinct things expressible by figures.
  2. To count] to reckon; to ascertain the units of; to enumerate.

    If a man can number the dust of the earth, then shall thy seed also be numbered. Gen. xiii. 16.

  3. A collection of many individuals; a numerous assemblage; a multitude; many.

    Ladies are always of great use to the party they espouse, and never fail to win over numbers. Addison.

  4. To reckon as one of a collection or multitude.

    He was numbered with the transgressors. Is. liii. 12.

  5. A numeral; a word or character denoting a number; as, to put a number on a door.
  6. To give or apply a number or numbers to; to assign the place of in a series by order of number; to designate the place of by a number or numeral; as, to number the houses in a street, or the apartments in a building.
  7. Numerousness; multitude.

    Number itself importeth not much in armies where the people are of weak courage. Bacon.

  8. To amount; to equal in number; to contain; to consist of; as, the army numbers fifty thousand.

    Thy tears can not number the dead. Campbell.

    Numbering machine, a machine for printing consecutive numbers, as on railway tickets, bank bills, etc.

    Syn. -- To count; enumerate; calculate; tell.

  9. The state or quality of being numerable or countable.

    Of whom came nations, tribes, people, and kindreds out of number. 2 Esdras iii. 7.

  10. Quantity, regarded as made up of an aggregate of separate things.
  11. That which is regulated by count; poetic measure, as divisions of time or number of syllables; hence, poetry, verse; -- chiefly used in the plural.

    I lisped in numbers, for the numbers came. Pope.

  12. The distinction of objects, as one, or more than one (in some languages, as one, or two, or more than two), expressed (usually) by a difference in the form of a word; thus, the singular number and the plural number are the names of the forms of a word indicating the objects denoted or referred to by the word as one, or as more than one.
  13. The measure of the relation between quantities or things of the same kind; that abstract species of quantity which is capable of being expressed by figures; numerical value.

    Abstract number, Abundant number, Cardinal number, etc. See under Abstract, Abundant, etc. -- In numbers, in numbered parts; as, a book published in numbers.

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Number

NUM'BER, noun [Probably the radical sense is to speak, name or tell, as our word tell, in the other dialects, is to number number may be allied to name, as the Spaniards use nombre for name, and the French word written with the same letters, is number ]

1. The designation of a unit reference to other units, or in reckoning, counting, enumerating; as, one is the first number; a simple number

2. An assemblage of two or more units. Two is a number composed of one and one added. Five and three added make the number eight. number may be applied to any collection or multitude of units or individuals, and therefore is indefinite, unless defined by other words or by figures or signs of definite signification. Hence,

3. More than one; many.

Ladies are always of great use to the party they espouse, and never fail to win over numbers.

4. Multitude.

Number itself importeth not much in armies, where the men are of weak courage.

5. In poetry, measure; the order and quantity of syllables constituting feet, which render verse musical to the ear. The harmony of verse consists in the proper distribution of the long and short syllables, with suitable pauses. In oratory, a judicious disposition of words, syllables and cadences constitutes a kind of measure resembling poetic numbers.

6. Poetry; verse.

I lisped in numbers, for the numbers came.

Here the first word numbers may be taken for poetry or verse, and the second for measure.

Yet shoud the Muses bid my numbers roll.

7. In grammar, the difference of termination or form of a word, to express unity or plurality. The termination which denotes one or an individual, is the singular number; the termination that denotes two or more individuals or units, constitues the plural number Hence we say, a noun, an adjective, a pronoun or a verb is in the singular or the plural number

8. In mathematics, number is variously distinguished. cardinal numbers are those which express the amount of units; as 1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10. Ordinal numbers are those which express order; as first, second, third, fourth, etc.

Determinate number is that referred to a given unit, as a ternary or three; an indeterminate number is referred to unity in general, and called quantity.

Homogeneal numbers, are those referred to the same units; those referred to different units are termed heterogeneal.

Whole numbers, are called integers.

A rational number is one commensurable with unity. A number incommensurable with unity, is termed irrational or surd.

A prime or primitive number is divisible only by unity; as three, five, seven, etc.

A perfect number is that whose aliquot parts added together, make the whole number as 28, whose aliquot parts, 14. 7. 4. 2. 1. make the number 28.

An imperfect number is that whose aliquot parts added together, make more or less than the number This is abundant or defedtive; abundant, as 12, whose aliquot parts, 6. 4. 3. 2. 1. make 16; or defective, as 16 whose aliquot parts, 8. 4. 2. 1. make 15 only.

A square number is the product of a number multiplied by itself; as, 16 is the square number of four.

A cubic number is the product of a square number by its root; as, 27 is the product of the square number 9 by its root 3.

Golden number the cycle of the moon, or revolution of 19 years, in which time the conjunctions, oppositions and other aspects of the moon are nearly the same as they were on the same days of the month 19 years before.

NUM'BER, verb transitive

1. To count; to reckon; to ascertain the units of any sum, collection or multitude.

If a man can number the dust of the earth, then shall thy seed also be numbered. Genesis 8:1.

2. To reckon as one of a collection or multitude.

He was numbered with the transgressors. Isaiah 53:12.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

mauther

MAU'THER, n. A foolish young girl. [Not used.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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