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Wednesday - December 19, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [notwithstanding]

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notwithstanding

NOTWITHSTAND'ING, the participle of withstand, with not prefixed, and signifying not opposing; nevertheless. It retains in all cases its participial signification. For example, "I will surely rend the knigdom from thee, and will give it to thy servant; notwithstanding, in thy days I will not do it, for david thy father's sake." 1 Kings 11. In this passage there is an ellipsis of that, after notwithstanding. That refers to the former part of the sentence, I will rend the kingdom from thee; notwithstanding that (declaration or determination,) in thy days I will not do it. in this and in all cases, notwithstanding, either with or without that or this, constitutes the case absolute or independent.

"It is a rainy day, but notwithstanding that, the troops must be reviewed; " that is, the rainy day not opposing or preventing. That, in this case, is a substitute for the whole first clause of the sentence. It is to that clause what a relative is to an antecedent noun, and which may be used in the place of it; notwithstanding which, that is, the rainy day.

"Christ enjoined on his followers not to publish the cures he wrought; but notwithstanding his injunctions, they proclaimed them." Here, notwithstanding his injunctions, is the case independent or absolute; the injunctions of Christ not opposing or preventing.

This word answers precisely to the latin non obstante, and both are used with nouns or with substitutes for nouns, for sentences or for clauses of sentences. So in the Latin phrase, hoc non obstante, hoc may refer to a single word, to a sentence or to a series of sentences.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [notwithstanding]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

NOTWITHSTAND'ING, the participle of withstand, with not prefixed, and signifying not opposing; nevertheless. It retains in all cases its participial signification. For example, "I will surely rend the knigdom from thee, and will give it to thy servant; notwithstanding, in thy days I will not do it, for david thy father's sake." 1 Kings 11. In this passage there is an ellipsis of that, after notwithstanding. That refers to the former part of the sentence, I will rend the kingdom from thee; notwithstanding that (declaration or determination,) in thy days I will not do it. in this and in all cases, notwithstanding, either with or without that or this, constitutes the case absolute or independent.

"It is a rainy day, but notwithstanding that, the troops must be reviewed; " that is, the rainy day not opposing or preventing. That, in this case, is a substitute for the whole first clause of the sentence. It is to that clause what a relative is to an antecedent noun, and which may be used in the place of it; notwithstanding which, that is, the rainy day.

"Christ enjoined on his followers not to publish the cures he wrought; but notwithstanding his injunctions, they proclaimed them." Here, notwithstanding his injunctions, is the case independent or absolute; the injunctions of Christ not opposing or preventing.

This word answers precisely to the latin non obstante, and both are used with nouns or with substitutes for nouns, for sentences or for clauses of sentences. So in the Latin phrase, hoc non obstante, hoc may refer to a single word, to a sentence or to a series of sentences.

NOT-WITH-STAND'ING, adv.

The participle of withstand, with not prefixed, and signifying not opposing; nevertheless. It retains in all cases its participial signification. For example, “I will surely rend the kingdom front thee, and will give it to thy servant; notwithstanding, in thy days I will not do it, for David thy father's sake.” 1 Kings xi. In this passage there is an ellipsis of that, after notwithstanding. That refers to the former part of the sentence, I will rend the kingdom from thee; notwithstanding that [declaration or determination,] in thy days I will not do it. In this and in all cases, notwithstanding, either with or without that or this, constitutes the case absolute or independent. “It is a rainy day, but notwithstanding that, the troops must be reviewed;” that is, the rainy day not opposing or preventing. That, in this case, is a substitute for the whole first clause of the sentence. It is to that clause what a relative is to an antecedent noun, and which may be used in the place of it; notwithstanding which, that is, the rainy day. “Christ enjoined on his followers not to publish the cures he wrought; but notwithstanding his injunctions, they proclaimed them.” Here, notwithstanding his injunctions, is the case independent or absolute; the injunctions of Christ not opposing or preventing. This word answers precisely to the Latin non obstante, and both are used with nouns or with substitutes for nouns, for sentences or for clauses of sentences. So in the Latin phrase, hoc non obstante, hoc may refer to a single word, to a sentence or to a series of sentences.


Not`with*stand"ing
  1. Without prevention, or obstruction from or by; in spite of.

    We gentil women bee
    Loth to displease any wight,
    Notwithstanding our great right.
    Chaucer's Dream.

    Those on whom Christ bestowed miraculous cures were so transported that their gratitude made them, notwithstanding his prohibition, proclaim the wonders he had done. Dr. H. More.

    * Notwithstanding was, by Johnson and Webster, viewed as a participle absolute, an English equivalent of the Latin non obstante. Its several meanings, either as preposition, adverb, or conjunction, are capable of being explained in this view. Later grammarians, while admitting that the word was originally a participle, and can be treated as such, prefer to class it as a preposition or disjunctive conjunction.

    Syn. -- In spite of; despite. -- Notwithstanding, In spite of, Despite. These words and phrases are often interchanged, but there is a difference between them, chiefly in strength. Notwithstanding is the weaker term, and simply points to some obstacle that may exist; as, I shall go, notwithstanding the rain. In spite or despite of has reference primarily to active opposition to be encountered from others; as, "I'll be, in man's despite, a monarch; " "I'll keep mine own, despite of all the world." Shak. Hence, these words, when applied to things, suppose greater opposition than notwithstanding. We should say. "He was thrust rudely out of doors in spite of his entreaties," rather than "notwithstanding". On the other hand, it would be more civil to say, "Notwithstanding all you have said, I must still differ with you."

  2. Nevertheless; however; although; as, I shall go, notwithstanding it rains.

    I will surely rend the kingdom from thee, and will give it to thy servant. Notwithstanding, in thy days I will not do it. 1 Kings xi. 11, 12.

    They which honor the law as an image of the wisdom of God himself, are, notwithstanding, to know that the same had an end in Christ. Hooker.

    You did wisely and honestly too, notwithstanding
    She is the greatest beauty in the parish.
    Fielding.

    Notwithstanding that, notwithstanding; although.

    These days were ages to him, notwithstanding that he was basking in the smiles of the pretty Mary. W. Irving.

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Notwithstanding

NOTWITHSTAND'ING, the participle of withstand, with not prefixed, and signifying not opposing; nevertheless. It retains in all cases its participial signification. For example, 'I will surely rend the knigdom from thee, and will give it to thy servant; notwithstanding in thy days I will not do it, for david thy father's sake.' 1 Kings 11:12. In this passage there is an ellipsis of that, after notwithstanding That refers to the former part of the sentence, I will rend the kingdom from thee; notwithstanding that (declaration or determination, ) in thy days I will not do it. in this and in all cases, notwithstanding either with or without that or this, constitutes the case absolute or independent.

'It is a rainy day, but notwithstanding that, the troops must be reviewed; ' that is, the rainy day not opposing or preventing. That, in this case, is a substitute for the whole first clause of the sentence. It is to that clause what a relative is to an antecedent noun, and which may be used in the place of it; notwithstanding which, that is, the rainy day.

'Christ enjoined on his followers not to publish the cures he wrought; but notwithstanding his injunctions, they proclaimed them.' Here, notwithstanding his injunctions, is the case independent or absolute; the injunctions of Christ not opposing or preventing.

This word answers precisely to the latin non obstante, and both are used with nouns or with substitutes for nouns, for sentences or for clauses of sentences. So in the Latin phrase, hoc non obstante, hoc may refer to a single word, to a sentence or to a series of sentences.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

whisper

WHISPER, v.i. [L. The word seems by its sound to be an onomatopy, as it expresses a sibilant sound or breathing.]

1. To speak with a low hissing or sibilant voice. It is ill manners to whisper in company.

The hollow whispring breeze--

2. To speak with suspicion or timorous caution.

3. To plot secretly; to devise in mischief.

All that hate me whisper together against me. Psalm 41.

WHISPER, v.t.

1. To address in a low voice. He whispers the man in the ear. [But this is elliptical for whispers to.]

2. To utter in a low sibilant voice. He whispered a word in my ear.

3. To prompt secretly; as, the came to whisper Woolsey.

WHISPER, n.

1. A low soft sibilant voice; or words uttered with such a voice.

The whisper cannot give a tone.

Soft whispers through the assembly went.

2. A cautious or timorous speech.

3. A hissing or buzzing sound.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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