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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [note]

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note

NOTE, for ne wote, knew not or could not.

NOTE, n. [L. to know.]

1. A mark or token; something by which a thing may be known; a visible sign.

They who appertain to the visible church have all the notes of external profession.

2. A mark made in a book, indicating something worthy of a particular notice.

3. A short remark; a passage or explanation in the margin of a book.

4. A minute, memorandum or short writing intended to assist the memory.

5. Notice; heed.

Give order to my servants that they take no note at all of our being absent hence.

6. Reputation; consequence; distinction; as men of note. Acts 16.

7. State of being observed.

Small matters, continually in use and note. [Little used.]

8. In music, a character which marks a sound, or the sound itself; as a semibreve, a minim, &c. Notes are marks of sounds in relation to elevation or depresion, or to the time of continuing sounds.

9. Tune; voice; harmonious or melocious sounds.

The wakeful bird tunes her nocturnal note.

One common note on either lyre did strike.

10. Abbreviation; symbol.

11. A short letter; a billet.

12. Annotation; commentary; as the notes in Scott's Bible; to write notes on Homer.

13. A written or printed paper acknowledging a debt and promising payment; as a promissory note; a bank-note; a note of hand; a negotiable note.

14. Notes, plu. a writing; a written discourse; applied equally to minutes or heads of a discourse or argument, or to a discourse fully written. The advocate often has notes to assist his memory, and clergymen preach with notes or without them.

15. A diplomatic communication in writing; an official paper sent from one minister or envoy to another.

My note of January 10th still remains unanswered.

NOTE, v.t.

1. To observe; to notice with particular care; to heed; to attend to.

No more of that; I have noted it well.

Their manners noted and their states survey'd.

2. To set down in writing.

Note it in a book. Isaiah 30.

3. To charge, as with a crime; with of or for.

They were both noted of incontinency.

NOTE, v.t. To butt; to push with the horns. [Not used.]




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [note]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

NOTE, for ne wote, knew not or could not.

NOTE, n. [L. to know.]

1. A mark or token; something by which a thing may be known; a visible sign.

They who appertain to the visible church have all the notes of external profession.

2. A mark made in a book, indicating something worthy of a particular notice.

3. A short remark; a passage or explanation in the margin of a book.

4. A minute, memorandum or short writing intended to assist the memory.

5. Notice; heed.

Give order to my servants that they take no note at all of our being absent hence.

6. Reputation; consequence; distinction; as men of note. Acts 16.

7. State of being observed.

Small matters, continually in use and note. [Little used.]

8. In music, a character which marks a sound, or the sound itself; as a semibreve, a minim, &c. Notes are marks of sounds in relation to elevation or depresion, or to the time of continuing sounds.

9. Tune; voice; harmonious or melocious sounds.

The wakeful bird tunes her nocturnal note.

One common note on either lyre did strike.

10. Abbreviation; symbol.

11. A short letter; a billet.

12. Annotation; commentary; as the notes in Scott's Bible; to write notes on Homer.

13. A written or printed paper acknowledging a debt and promising payment; as a promissory note; a bank-note; a note of hand; a negotiable note.

14. Notes, plu. a writing; a written discourse; applied equally to minutes or heads of a discourse or argument, or to a discourse fully written. The advocate often has notes to assist his memory, and clergymen preach with notes or without them.

15. A diplomatic communication in writing; an official paper sent from one minister or envoy to another.

My note of January 10th still remains unanswered.

NOTE, v.t.

1. To observe; to notice with particular care; to heed; to attend to.

No more of that; I have noted it well.

Their manners noted and their states survey'd.

2. To set down in writing.

Note it in a book. Isaiah 30.

3. To charge, as with a crime; with of or for.

They were both noted of incontinency.

NOTE, v.t. To butt; to push with the horns. [Not used.]


NOTE, v.t. [Sax. hnitan.]

To butt; to push with the horns. [Not used.] Ray.


NOTE, n. [L. nota; Fr. note; W. nod; from L. notus, nosco, to know.]

  1. A mark or token; something by which a thing may be known; a visible sign. They who appertain to the visible church have all the notes of external profession. – Hooker.
  2. A mark made in a book, indicating something worthy of particular notice.
  3. A short remark; a passage or explanation in the margin of a book.
  4. A minute, memorandum or short writing intended to assist the memory.
  5. Notice; heed. Give order to my servants that they take / No note at all of our being absent hence. – Shak.
  6. Reputation; consequence; distinction; as, men of note. – Acts xvi.
  7. State of being observed. Small matters, continually in use and note. [Little used.] – Bacon.
  8. In music, a character which marks a sound, or the sound itself; as a semibreve, a minim, &c. Notes are marks of sounds in relation to elevation or depression, or to the time of continuing sounds.
  9. Tune; voice; harmonious or melodious sounds. The wakeful bird tunes her nocturnal note. – Milton. One common note on either lyre did strike. – Dryden.
  10. Abbreviation; symbol. – Baker.
  11. A short letter; a billet. – Dryden.
  12. Annotation; commentary; as, the notes in Scott's Bible; to write notes on Homer.
  13. A written or printed paper acknowledging a debt and promising payment; as, a promissory nate; a bank-note; a note of hand; a negotiable note.
  14. Notes, plur., a writing; a written discourse; applied equally to minutes or heads of a discourse or argument, or to a discourse fully written. The advocate often has notes to assist his memory, and clergymen preach with notes or without them.
  15. A diplomatic communication in writing; an official paper sent from one minister or envoy to another. My note of January 10th still remains unanswered. Gallatin.

NOTE, v.

For ne wote, knew not or could not. – Chaucer. Spenser.


NOTE, v.t. [L. noto.]

  1. To observe; to notice with particular care; to heed; to attend to. No more of that; I have noted it well. Shak. Their manners noted and their states survey'd. Pope.
  2. To set down in writing. Note it in a book. Is. xxx.
  3. To charge, as with a crime; with of or for. They were both noted of incontinency. [Obs.] Dryden.

Note
  1. To butt; to push with the horns.

    [Prov. Eng.]
  2. Know not; knows not.

    [Obs.]
  3. Nut.

    [Obs.] Chaucer.
  4. Need; needful business.

    [Obs.] Chaucer.
  5. A mark or token by which a thing may be known; a visible sign; a character; a distinctive mark or feature; a characteristic quality.

    Whosoever appertain to the visible body of the church, they have also the notes of external profession. Hooker.

    She [the Anglican church] has the note of possession, the note of freedom from party titles,the note of life -- a tough life and a vigorous. J. H. Newman.

    What a note of youth, of imagination, of impulsive eagerness, there was through it all ! Mrs. Humphry Ward.

  6. To notice with care] to observe; to remark; to heed; to attend to.

    Pope.

    No more of that; I have noted it well. Shak.

  7. A mark, or sign, made to call attention, to point out something to notice, or the like; a sign, or token, proving or giving evidence.
  8. To record in writing; to make a memorandum of.

    Every unguarded word . . . was noted down. Maccaulay.

  9. A brief remark; a marginal comment or explanation; hence, an annotation on a text or author; a comment; a critical, explanatory, or illustrative observation.

    The best writers have been perplexed with notes, and obscured with illustrations. Felton.

  10. To charge, as with crime (with of or for before the thing charged); to brand.

    [Obs.]

    They were both noted of incontinency. Dryden.

  11. A brief writing intended to assist the memory; a memorandum; a minute.
  12. To denote; to designate.

    Johnson.
  13. Hence, a writing intended to be used in speaking; memoranda to assist a speaker, being either a synopsis, or the full text of what is to be said; as, to preach from notes; also, a reporter's memoranda; the original report of a speech or of proceedings.
  14. To annotate.

    [R.] W. H. Dixon.
  15. A short informal letter; a billet.
  16. To set down in musical characters.

    To note a bill or draft, to record on the back of it a refusal of acceptance, as the ground of a protest, which is done officially by a notary.

  17. A diplomatic missive or written communication.
  18. A written or printed paper acknowledging a debt, and promising payment; as, a promissory note; a note of hand; a negotiable note.
  19. A list of items or of charges; an account.

    [Obs.]

    Here is now the smith's note for shoeing. Shak.

  20. A character, variously formed, to indicate the length of a tone, and variously placed upon the staff to indicate its pitch. Hence:

    (b)
  21. Observation; notice; heed.

    Give orders to my servants that they take
    No note at all of our being absent hence.
    Shak.

  22. Notification; information; intelligence.

    [Obs.]

    The king . . . shall have note of this. Shak.

  23. State of being under observation.

    [Obs.]

    Small matters . . . continually in use and in note. Bacon.

  24. Reputation; distinction; as, a poet of note.

    There was scarce a family of note which had not poured out its blood on the field or the scaffold. Prescott.

  25. Stigma; brand; reproach.

    [Obs.] Shak.

    Note of hand, a promissory note.

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Note

NOTE, for ne wote, knew not or could not.

NOTE, noun [Latin to know.]

1. A mark or token; something by which a thing may be known; a visible sign.

They who appertain to the visible church have all the notes of external profession.

2. A mark made in a book, indicating something worthy of a particular notice.

3. A short remark; a passage or explanation in the margin of a book.

4. A minute, memorandum or short writing intended to assist the memory.

5. Notice; heed.

Give order to my servants that they take no note at all of our being absent hence.

6. Reputation; consequence; distinction; as men of note Acts 16:1.

7. State of being observed.

Small matters, continually in use and note [Little used.]

8. In music, a character which marks a sound, or the sound itself; as a semibreve, a minim, etc. Notes are marks of sounds in relation to elevation or depresion, or to the time of continuing sounds.

9. Tune; voice; harmonious or melocious sounds.

The wakeful bird tunes her nocturnal note

One common note on either lyre did strike.

10. Abbreviation; symbol.

11. A short letter; a billet.

12. Annotation; commentary; as the notes in Scott's Bible; to write notes on Homer.

13. A written or printed paper acknowledging a debt and promising payment; as a promissory note; a bank-note; a note of hand; a negotiable note

14. Notes, plural a writing; a written discourse; applied equally to minutes or heads of a discourse or argument, or to a discourse fully written. The advocate often has notes to assist his memory, and clergymen preach with notes or without them.

15. A diplomatic communication in writing; an official paper sent from one minister or envoy to another.

My note of January 10th still remains unanswered.

NOTE, verb transitive

1. To observe; to notice with particular care; to heed; to attend to.

No more of that; I have noted it well.

Their manners noted and their states survey'd.

2. To set down in writing.

NOTE it in a book. Isaiah 30:8.

3. To charge, as with a crime; with of or for.

They were both noted of incontinency.

NOTE, verb transitive To butt; to push with the horns. [Not used.]

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I am impressed by the fact that he uses so much scripture in expressing the use of given words. He was a very well versed and a true wordsmith.

— JG (Rainbow City, AL)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

undrawn

UNDRAWN', a.

1. Not drawn; not pulled by an external force.

2. Not allured by motives or persuasion.

3. Not taken from the box; as an undrawn ticket.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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