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Friday - July 23, 2021

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [need]

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need

NEED, n. [to be in want. The primary sense is to press.]

1. Want; occasion for something; necessity; a state that requires supply or relief. It sometimes expresses urgent want; pressing exigency.

What further need have we of witnesses? Matthew 26.

2. Want of the means of subsistence; poverty; indigence.

I know how to abound and to suffer need. Philippians 4.

NEED, v.t. [ to compel] To want; to lack; to require, as supply or relief.

They that be whole need not a physician, but they that are sick. Matthew 9.

NEED,v.i. To be wanted; to be necessary.

When we have done it, we have done all that is in our power, and all that needs. [Not used.]

Need is often used as an auxiliary, or at least without the personal termination.

And the lender need not fear he shall be injured.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [need]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

NEED, n. [to be in want. The primary sense is to press.]

1. Want; occasion for something; necessity; a state that requires supply or relief. It sometimes expresses urgent want; pressing exigency.

What further need have we of witnesses? Matthew 26.

2. Want of the means of subsistence; poverty; indigence.

I know how to abound and to suffer need. Philippians 4.

NEED, v.t. [ to compel] To want; to lack; to require, as supply or relief.

They that be whole need not a physician, but they that are sick. Matthew 9.

NEED,v.i. To be wanted; to be necessary.

When we have done it, we have done all that is in our power, and all that needs. [Not used.]

Need is often used as an auxiliary, or at least without the personal termination.

And the lender need not fear he shall be injured.

NEED, n. [Sax. nead, neod, nyd; D. nood; G. noth; Sw. nod; Dan. nöd; Eth. ነድየ nadei, to be in want. The primary sense is to press. Class Nd, No. 7, 24.]

  1. Want; occasion for something; necessity; a state that requires supply or relief. It sometimes expresses urgent want; pressing exigency. What further need have we of witnesses? Matth. xxvi. For ye have need of patience. Heb. x.
  2. Want of the means of subsistence; poverty; indigence. I know how to abound and to suffer need. Phil. iv.

NEED, v.i.

To be wanted; to be necessary. When we have done it, we have done all that is in our power, and all that needs. [Not used.] Locke. Need is often used as an auxiliary, or at least without the personal termination. And the lender need not fear he shall be injured. Anacharsis, Trans.


NEED, v.t. [Sax. geneadan, genedan, to compel; Dan. nöder.]

To want; to lack; to require, as supply or relief. They that be whole, need not a physician, but they that are sick. Matth. ix.


Need
  1. A state that requires supply or relief; pressing occasion for something; necessity; urgent want.

    And the city had no need of the sun. Rev. xxi. 23.

    I have no need to beg. Shak.

    Be governed by your needs, not by your fancy. Jer. Taylor.

  2. To be in want of; to have cause or occasion for; to lack; to require, as supply or relief.

    Other creatures all day long
    Rove idle, unemployed, and less need rest.
    Milton.

    * With another verb, need is used like an auxiliary, generally in a negative sentence expressing requirement or obligation, and in this use it undergoes no change of termination in the third person singular of the present tense. "And the lender need not fear he shall be injured." Anacharsis (Trans. ).

  3. To be wanted; to be necessary.

    Chaucer.

    When we have done it, we have done all that is in our power, and all that needs. Locke.

  4. Of necessity. See Needs.

    [Obs.] Chaucer.
  5. Want of the means of subsistence; poverty; indigence; destitution.

    Chaucer.

    Famine is in thy cheeks;
    Need and oppression starveth in thine eyes.
    Shak.

  6. That which is needful; anything necessary to be done; (pl.) necessary things; business.

    [Obs.] Chaucer.
  7. Situation of need; peril; danger.

    [Obs.] Chaucer.

    Syn. -- Exigency; emergency; strait; extremity; necessity; distress; destitution; poverty; indigence; want; penury. -- Need, Necessity. Necessity is stronger than need; it places us under positive compulsion. We are frequently under the necessity of going without that of which we stand very greatly in need. It is also with the corresponding adjectives; necessitous circumstances imply the direct pressure of suffering; needy circumstances, the want of aid or relief.

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Need

NEED, noun [to be in want. The primary sense is to press.]

1. Want; occasion for something; necessity; a state that requires supply or relief. It sometimes expresses urgent want; pressing exigency.

What further need have we of witnesses? Matthew 26:65.

2. Want of the means of subsistence; poverty; indigence.

I know how to abound and to suffer need Philippians 4:12.

NEED, verb transitive [ to compel] To want; to lack; to require, as supply or relief.

They that be whole need not a physician, but they that are sick. Matthew 9:12.

NEED, verb intransitive To be wanted; to be necessary.

When we have done it, we have done all that is in our power, and all that needs. [Not used.]

NEED is often used as an auxiliary, or at least without the personal termination.

And the lender need not fear he shall be injured.

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For Bible Study. Etymology goes back to the root and development of the word. The 1812 Webster American Dictionary captures more detail and is a reflection of American mind at a time when the Bible was a great influence on American culture.

— TOM (Des Moines, IA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

fly

FLY, v.i.

1. To move through air by the aid of wings, as fowls.

2. To pass or move in air, by the force of wind or other impulse; as, clouds and vapors fly before the wind. A ball flies from a cannon, an arrow from a bow.

3. To rise in air, as light substances, by means of a current of air or by having less specific gravity than air, as smoke.

Man is born to trouble, as the sparks fly upward. Job. 5.

4. To move or pass with velocity or celerity, either on land or water. He flew to the relief of his distressed friend. The ship flies upon the main.

5. To move rapidly, in any manner; as, a top flies about.

6. To pass away; to depart; with the idea of haste, swiftness or escape. The bird has flown.

7. To pass rapidly, as time. Swift fly the fleeting hours.

8. To part suddenly or with violence; to burst, as a bottle.

9. To spring by an elastic force.

10. To pass swiftly, as rumor or report.

11. To flee; to run away; to attempt to escape; to escape.

I'll fly from shepherds, flocks, and flowery plains.

12. To flutter; to vibrate or play; as a flag in the wind.

To fly at, to spring towards; to rush on; to fall on suddenly. A hen flies at a dog or cat; a dog flies at a man.

1. To fly in the face, to insult.

2. To assail; to resist; to set at defiance; to oppose with violence; to act in direct opposition.

1. To fly off, to separate or depart suddenly.

2. To revolt.

To fly open, to open suddenly or with violence; as, the doors flew open.

1. To fly out, to rush out; also, to burst into a passion.

2. To break out into license.

3. To start or issue with violence from any direction.

1. To let fly, to discharge; to throw or drive with violence; as, to let fly a shower of darts.

2. In seamanship, to let go suddenly. Let fly the sheets.

FLY, v.t. [This is used for flee, and from is understood after fly, so that it can hardly be called a transitive verb.]

1. To shun; to avoid; to decline; as, to fly the sight of one we hate. That is, primarily, to flee from

Sleep flies the wretch.

2. To quit by flight.

3. To attack by a bird of prey. [Not used.]

4. To cause to float in the air.

FLY, n.

1. In zoology, a winged insect of various species, whose distinguishing characteristic is that the wings are transparent. By this flies are distinguished from beetles, butterflies, grasshoppers, &c. Of flies, some have two wings and others four.

In common language, fly is the house fly, of the genus Musca.

2. In mechanics, a cross with leaden weights at the ends, or a heavy wheel at right angles with the axis of a windlass, jack or the like. The use of this is, to regulate and equalize the motion in all parts of the revolution of the machine.

3. That part of a vane which points and shows which way the wind blows.

4. The extent of an ensign, flag or pendant from the staff to the end that flutters loose in the wind.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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