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Monday - December 10, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [neck]

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neck

NECK, n. [G. This word is properly the nape or vertebrae of the neck behind, and is so rendered in other languages, L. that is a knob or mass.]

1. The part of an animals body which is between the head and the trunk, and connects them. In man and many other animals, this part is more slender than the trunk; hence,

2. A long narrow tract of land projecting from the main body, or a narrow tract connecting two larger tracts; as the neck of land between Boston and Roxbury.

3. The long slender part of a vessel,, as a retort; or of a plant, as a gourd; or of any instrument, as a guitar.

A stiff neck, in Scripture, denotes obstinacy in sin.

On the neck , immediately after; following closely.

First by committing one sin on the neck of another.

[This phrase is not much used. We more frequently say, on the heels.]

To break the neck of an affair, to hinder, or to do the principal thing to prevent.

To harden the neck, to grow obstinate; to be more and more perverse and rebellious. Nehemiah 9.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [neck]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

NECK, n. [G. This word is properly the nape or vertebrae of the neck behind, and is so rendered in other languages, L. that is a knob or mass.]

1. The part of an animals body which is between the head and the trunk, and connects them. In man and many other animals, this part is more slender than the trunk; hence,

2. A long narrow tract of land projecting from the main body, or a narrow tract connecting two larger tracts; as the neck of land between Boston and Roxbury.

3. The long slender part of a vessel,, as a retort; or of a plant, as a gourd; or of any instrument, as a guitar.

A stiff neck, in Scripture, denotes obstinacy in sin.

On the neck , immediately after; following closely.

First by committing one sin on the neck of another.

[This phrase is not much used. We more frequently say, on the heels.]

To break the neck of an affair, to hinder, or to do the principal thing to prevent.

To harden the neck, to grow obstinate; to be more and more perverse and rebellious. Nehemiah 9.

NECK, n. [Sax. hnece, hnecca, necca; G. nick, genick, the nape of the neck; D. nek; Sw. nacke; Dan. nakke; It. Port. and Sp. nuca. This word is properly the nape or verteber of the neck behind, and is so rendered in other languages, L. nux; that is, a knob or mass; W. cnwc.]

  1. The part of an animal's body which is between the head and the trunk, and connects them. In man and many other animals, this part is more slender than the trunk; hence,
  2. A long narrow tract of land projecting from the main body, or a narrow tract connecting two larger tracts; as, the neck of land between Boston and Roxbury.
  3. The long slender part of a vessel, as a retort; or of a plant, as a gourd; or of any instrument, as a guitar. A stiff neck, in Scripture, denotes obstinacy in sin. On the neck, immediately after; following closely. First by committing one sin on the neck of another. Perkins. [This phrase is not much used. We more frequently say, on the heels.] To break the neck of an affair, to hinder, or to do the principal thing to prevent. To harden the neck, to grow obstinate; to be more and more perverse and rebellious. Neh. ix.

Neck
  1. The part of an animal which connects the head and the trunk, and which, in man and many other animals, is more slender than the trunk.
  2. To reduce the diameter of (an object) near its end, by making a groove around it] -- used with down; as, to neck down a shaft.
  3. Any part of an inanimate object corresponding to or resembling the neck of an animal

    ; as: (a)
  4. A reduction in size near the end of an object, formed by a groove around it; as, a neck forming the journal of a shaft.
  5. the point where the base of the stem of a plant arises from the root.

    Neck and crop, completely; wholly; altogether; roughly and at once. [Colloq.] -- Neck and neck (Racing), so nearly equal that one cannot be said to be before the other; very close; even; side by side. -- Neck of a capital. (Arch.) See Gorgerin. -- Neck of a cascabel (Gun.), the part joining the knob to the base of the breech. -- Neck of a gun, the small part of the piece between the chase and the swell of the muzzle. -- Neck of a tooth (Anat.), the constriction between the root and the crown. -- Neck or nothing (Fig.), at all risks. -- Neck verse. (a) The verse formerly read to entitle a party to the benefit of clergy, said to be the first verse of the fifty-first Psalm, "Miserere mei," etc. Sir W. Scott. (b) Hence, a verse or saying, the utterance of which decides one's fate; a shibboleth.

    These words, "bread and cheese," were their neck verse or shibboleth to distinguish them; all pronouncing "broad and cause," being presently put to death. Fuller.

    -- Neck yoke. (a) A bar by which the end of the tongue of a wagon or carriage is suspended from the collars of the harnesses. (b) A device with projecting arms for carrying things (as buckets of water or sap) suspended from one's shoulders. -- On the neck of, immediately after; following closely. "Commiting one sin on the neck of another." W. Perkins. -- Stiff neck, obstinacy in evil or wrong; inflexible obstinacy; contumacy. "I know thy rebellion, and thy stiff neck." Deut. xxxi. 27. -- To break the neck of, to destroy the main force of. "What they presume to borrow from her sage and virtuous rules . . . breaks the neck of their own cause." Milton. -- To harden the neck, to grow obstinate; to be more and more perverse and rebellious. Neh. ix. 17. -- To tread on the neck of, to oppress; to tyrannize over.

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Neck

NECK, noun [G. This word is properly the nape or vertebrae of the neck behind, and is so rendered in other languages, Latin that is a knob or mass.]

1. The part of an animals body which is between the head and the trunk, and connects them. In man and many other animals, this part is more slender than the trunk; hence,

2. A long narrow tract of land projecting from the main body, or a narrow tract connecting two larger tracts; as the neck of land between Boston and Roxbury.

3. The long slender part of a vessel, , as a retort; or of a plant, as a gourd; or of any instrument, as a guitar.

A stiff neck in Scripture, denotes obstinacy in sin.

On the neck , immediately after; following closely.

First by committing one sin on the neck of another.

[This phrase is not much used. We more frequently say, on the heels.]

To break the neck of an affair, to hinder, or to do the principal thing to prevent.

To harden the neck to grow obstinate; to be more and more perverse and rebellious. Nehemiah 9:29.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

flitch

FLITCH, n.

The side of a hog salted and cured.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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