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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [natural]

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natural

NATURAL, a. [to be born or produced]

1. Pertaining to nature; produced or effected by nature, or by the laws of growth, formation or motion impressed on bodies or beings by divine power. Thus we speak of the natural growth of animals or plants; the natural motion of a gravitating body; natural strength or disposition; the natural heat of the body; natural color; natural beauty. In this sense, natural is opposed to artificial or acquired.

2. According to the stated course of things. Poverty and shame are the natural consequences of certain vices.

3. Not forced; not far fetched; such as is dictated by nature. The gestures of the orator are natural.

4. According to the life; as a natural representation of the face.

5. Consonant to nature.

Fire and warmth go together, and so seem to carry with them as natural an evidence as self-evident truths themselves.

6. Derived from nature, as opposed to habitual. The love of pleasure is natural ; the love of study is usually habitual or acquired.

7. Discoverable by reason; not revealed; as natural religion.

8. Produced or coming in the ordinary course of things, or the progress or animals and vegetables; as a natural death; opposed to violent or premature.

9. Tender; affectionate by nature.

10. Unaffected; unassumed; according to truth and reality.

What can be more natural than the circumstances of the behavior of those women who had lost heir husbands on this fatal day?

11. Illegitimate; born out of wedlock; as a natural son.

12. Native; vernacular; as ones natural language.

13. Derived from the study of the works or nature; as natural knowledge.

14. A natural note, in music, is that which is according to the usual order of the scale; opposed to flat and sharp notes, which are called artificial.

Natural history, in its most extensive sense, is the description of whatever is created, or of the whole universe, including the heavens and the earth, and all the productions of the earth. But more generally, natural history is limited to a description of the earth and its productions, including zoology, botany, geology, mineralogy, meteorology, & c.

Natural philosophy, the science of material natural bodies, of their properties, powers and motions. It is distinguished from intellectual and moral philosophy, which respect the mind or understanding of man and the qualities of actions. Natural philosophy comprehends mechanics, hydrostatics, optics, astronomy, chimistry, magnetism, eletricity, galvanism, & c.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [natural]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

NATURAL, a. [to be born or produced]

1. Pertaining to nature; produced or effected by nature, or by the laws of growth, formation or motion impressed on bodies or beings by divine power. Thus we speak of the natural growth of animals or plants; the natural motion of a gravitating body; natural strength or disposition; the natural heat of the body; natural color; natural beauty. In this sense, natural is opposed to artificial or acquired.

2. According to the stated course of things. Poverty and shame are the natural consequences of certain vices.

3. Not forced; not far fetched; such as is dictated by nature. The gestures of the orator are natural.

4. According to the life; as a natural representation of the face.

5. Consonant to nature.

Fire and warmth go together, and so seem to carry with them as natural an evidence as self-evident truths themselves.

6. Derived from nature, as opposed to habitual. The love of pleasure is natural ; the love of study is usually habitual or acquired.

7. Discoverable by reason; not revealed; as natural religion.

8. Produced or coming in the ordinary course of things, or the progress or animals and vegetables; as a natural death; opposed to violent or premature.

9. Tender; affectionate by nature.

10. Unaffected; unassumed; according to truth and reality.

What can be more natural than the circumstances of the behavior of those women who had lost heir husbands on this fatal day?

11. Illegitimate; born out of wedlock; as a natural son.

12. Native; vernacular; as ones natural language.

13. Derived from the study of the works or nature; as natural knowledge.

14. A natural note, in music, is that which is according to the usual order of the scale; opposed to flat and sharp notes, which are called artificial.

Natural history, in its most extensive sense, is the description of whatever is created, or of the whole universe, including the heavens and the earth, and all the productions of the earth. But more generally, natural history is limited to a description of the earth and its productions, including zoology, botany, geology, mineralogy, meteorology, & c.

Natural philosophy, the science of material natural bodies, of their properties, powers and motions. It is distinguished from intellectual and moral philosophy, which respect the mind or understanding of man and the qualities of actions. Natural philosophy comprehends mechanics, hydrostatics, optics, astronomy, chimistry, magnetism, eletricity, galvanism, & c.

NAT'U-RAL, a. [Fr. naturel; L. naturalis, from natura, nature, from nascor, to be born or produced.]

  1. Pertaining to nature; produced or effected by nature, or by the laws of growth, formation or motion impressed on bodies or beings by divine power. Thus we speak of the natural growth of animals or plants; the natural motion of a gravitating body; natural strength or disposition; the natural heat of the body; natural color; natural beauty. In this sense, nature is opposed to artificial or acquired.
  2. According to the stated course of things. Poverty and shame are the natural consequences of certain vices.
  3. Not forced; not far fetched; such as is dictated by nature. The gestures of the orator are natural.
  4. According to the life; as, a natural representation of the face.
  5. Consonant to nature. Fire and warmth go together, and so seem to carry with them as natural an evidence as self-evident truths themselves. Locke.
  6. Derived from nature, as opposed to habitual. The love of pleasure is natural; the love of study is usually habitual or acquired.
  7. Discoverable by reason; not revealed; as, natural religion.
  8. Produced or coming in the ordinary course of things, or the progress of animals and vegetables; as, a natural death opposed to violent or premature.
  9. Tender; affectionate by nature. Shak.
  10. Unaffected; unassumed; according to truth and reality. What can be more natural than the circumstances of the behavior of those women who had lost their husbands on this fatal day? Addison.
  11. Illegitimate; born out of wedlock; as, a natural son.
  12. Native; vernacular; as, one's natural language. Swift.
  13. Derived from the study of the works of nature; as, natural knowledge. Addison.
  14. A natural note, in music, is that which is according to the usual order of the scale; opposed to flat and sharp notes, which are called artificial. Natural history, in its most extensive sense, is the description of whatever is created, or of the whole universe, including the heavens and the earth, and all the productions of the earth. But more generally, natural history is limited to a description of the earth and its productions, including zoology, botany, geology, mineralogy, meteorology, &c. Natural philosophy, the science of material natural bodies, of their properties, powers and motions. It is distinguished from intellectual and moral philosophy, which respect the mind or understanding of man and the qualities of actions. Natural philosophy comprehends mechanics, hydrostatics, optics, astronomy, chimistry, magnetism, electricity, galvanism, &c.

NAT'U-RAL, n.

  1. An idiot; one born without the usual powers of reason or understanding. This is probably elliptical for natural fool.
  2. A native; an original inhabitant. [Not in use.] Ralegh.
  3. Gift of nature; natural quality. [Not in use.] B. Jonson. Wotton.

Nat"u*ral
  1. Fixed or determined by nature; pertaining to the constitution of a thing; belonging to native character; according to nature; essential; characteristic; not artificial, foreign, assumed, put on, or acquired; as, the natural growth of animals or plants; the natural motion of a gravitating body; natural strength or disposition; the natural heat of the body; natural color.

    With strong natural sense, and rare force of will. Macaulay.

  2. A native; an aboriginal.

    [Obs.] Sir W. Raleigh.
  3. Conformed to the order, laws, or actual facts, of nature; consonant to the methods of nature; according to the stated course of things, or in accordance with the laws which govern events, feelings, etc.; not exceptional or violent; legitimate; normal; regular; as, the natural consequence of crime; a natural death.

    What can be more natural than the circumstances in the behavior of those women who had lost their husbands on this fatal day? Addison.

  4. Natural gifts, impulses, etc.

    [Obs.] Fuller.
  5. Having to do with existing system to things; dealing with, or derived from, the creation, or the world of matter and mind, as known by man; within the scope of human reason or experience; not supernatural; as, a natural law; natural science; history, theology.

    I call that natural religion which men might know . . . by the mere principles of reason, improved by consideration and experience, without the help of revelation. Bp. Wilkins.

  6. One born without the usual powers of reason or understanding; an idiot.

    "The minds of naturals." Locke.
  7. Conformed to truth or reality

    ; as: (a)
  8. A character [***natural]] used to contradict, or to remove the effect of, a sharp or flat which has preceded it, and to restore the unaltered note.
  9. Having the character or sentiments properly belonging to one's position; not unnatural in feelings.

    To leave his wife, to leave his babes, . . .
    He wants the natural touch.
    Shak.

  10. Connected by the ties of consanguinity.

    "Natural friends." J. H. Newman.
  11. Begotten without the sanction of law; born out of wedlock; illegitimate; bastard; as, a natural child.
  12. Of or pertaining to the lower or animal nature, as contrasted with the higher or moral powers, or that which is spiritual; being in a state of nature; unregenerate.

    The natural man receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God. 1 Cor. ii. 14.

  13. Belonging to, to be taken in, or referred to, some system, in which the base is 1; -- said or certain functions or numbers; as, natural numbers, those commencing at 1; natural sines, cosines, etc., those taken in arcs whose radii are 1.

  14. Produced by natural organs, as those of the human throat, in distinction from instrumental music.

    (b)
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Natural

NATURAL, adjective [to be born or produced]

1. Pertaining to nature; produced or effected by nature, or by the laws of growth, formation or motion impressed on bodies or beings by divine power. Thus we speak of the natural growth of animals or plants; the natural motion of a gravitating body; natural strength or disposition; the natural heat of the body; natural color; natural beauty. In this sense, natural is opposed to artificial or acquired.

2. According to the stated course of things. Poverty and shame are the natural consequences of certain vices.

3. Not forced; not far fetched; such as is dictated by nature. The gestures of the orator are natural

4. According to the life; as a natural representation of the face.

5. Consonant to nature.

Fire and warmth go together, and so seem to carry with them as natural an evidence as self-evident truths themselves.

6. Derived from nature, as opposed to habitual. The love of pleasure is natural ; the love of study is usually habitual or acquired.

7. Discoverable by reason; not revealed; as natural religion.

8. Produced or coming in the ordinary course of things, or the progress or animals and vegetables; as a natural death; opposed to violent or premature.

9. Tender; affectionate by nature.

10. Unaffected; unassumed; according to truth and reality.

What can be more natural than the circumstances of the behavior of those women who had lost heir husbands on this fatal day?

11. Illegitimate; born out of wedlock; as a natural son.

12. Native; vernacular; as ones natural language.

13. Derived from the study of the works or nature; as natural knowledge.

14. A natural note, in music, is that which is according to the usual order of the scale; opposed to flat and sharp notes, which are called artificial.

NATURAL history, in its most extensive sense, is the description of whatever is created, or of the whole universe, including the heavens and the earth, and all the productions of the earth. But more generally, natural history is limited to a description of the earth and its productions, including zoology, botany, geology, mineralogy, meteorology, _ c.

NATURAL philosophy, the science of material natural bodies, of their properties, powers and motions. It is distinguished from intellectual and moral philosophy, which respect the mind or understanding of man and the qualities of actions. natural philosophy comprehends mechanics, hydrostatics, optics, astronomy, chimistry, magnetism, eletricity, galvanism, _ c.

NATURAL, noun

1. An idiot; one born without the usual powers of reason or understanding. This is probably elliptical for natural fool.

2. A native; an original inhabitant.

3. Gift of nature; natural quality.

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Founded on Biblical precepts...definitive way English should be exercised.

— Timothy

Word of the Day

multiply

MUL'TIPLY, v.t. [L. multiplico; multus, many, and plico, to fold or double.]

1. To increase in number; to make more by natural generation or production, or by addition; as, to multiply men, horses or other animals; to multiply evils.

I will multiply my signs and wonders in Egypt. Ex.7.

Impunity will multiply motives to disobedience.

2. In arithmetic, to increase any given number as many times as there are units in any other given number. Thus 7x8=56, that is, 7 multiplied by 8 produces the number 56.

MUL'TIPLY, v.i. To grow or increase in number.

Be fruitful and multiply. Gen.1.

When men began to multiply on the face of the earth. Gen.6.

1. To increase in extent; to extend; to spread.

The word of God grew and multiplied. Acts 12.

Random Word

exhaustion

EXHAUST'ION, n. The act of drawing out or draining off; the act of emptying completely of the contents.

1. The state of being exhausted or emptied; the state of being deprived of strength or spirits.

2. In mathematics, a method of proving the equality of two magnitudes by a reductio ad absurdum, or showing that if one is supposed either greater or less than the other, there will arise a contradiction.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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