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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [lose]

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lose

LOSE, v.t. looz. pret. and pp. lost.

1. To mislay; to part or be separated from a thing, so as to have no knowledge of the place where it is; as, to lose a book or a paper; to lose a record; to lose a dollar or a ducat.

2. To forfeit by unsuccessful contest; as, to lose money in gaming.

3. Not to gain or win; as, to lose a battle, that is, to be defeated.

4. To be deprived of; as, to lose men in battle; to lose an arm or leg by a shot or by amputation; to lose one's life or honor.

5. To forfeit, as a penalty. Our first parents lost the favor of God by their apostasy.

6. To suffer diminution or waste of.

If the salt hath lost its savor, wherewith shall it be salted? Matt. 5.

7. To ruin; to destroy.

The woman that deliberates is lost.

8. To wander from; to miss, so as not to be able to find; as, to lose the way.

9. To bewilder.

Lost in the maze of words.

10. To possess no longer; to be deprived of; contrary to keep; as, to lose a valuable trade.

11. Not to employ or enjoy; to waste. Titus sighed to lose a day.

Th' unhappy have but hours, but these they lose.

12. To waste; to squander; to throw away; as, to lose a fortune by gaming, or by dissipation.

13. To suffer to vanish from view or perception. We lost sight of the land at noon. I lost my companion in the crowd.

Like following life in creatures we dissect, we lost it in the moment we detect.

14. To ruin; to destroy by shipwreck, &c. the albion was lost on the coast of Ireland, april 22, 1822. the admiral lost three ships in a tempest.

15. To cause to perish; as, to be lost at sea.

16. to employ ineffectually; to throw away; to waste. Instruction is often lost on the dull; admonition is lost on the profligate. It is often the fate of projectors to lose their labor.

17. to be freed from.

His scaly back the bunch has got which Edwin lost before.

18. to fail to obtain.

He shall in no wise lose his reward. Matt. 5.

to lose one's self, to be bewildered; also, to slumber; to have the memory and reason suspended.

LOSE, v.i. looz.

1. To forfeit any thing in contest; not to win.

We'll talk with them too, who loses and who wins; who's in, who's out.

2. To decline; to fail.

Wisdom in discourse with her loses discountenanced, and like folly shows.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [lose]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

LOSE, v.t. looz. pret. and pp. lost.

1. To mislay; to part or be separated from a thing, so as to have no knowledge of the place where it is; as, to lose a book or a paper; to lose a record; to lose a dollar or a ducat.

2. To forfeit by unsuccessful contest; as, to lose money in gaming.

3. Not to gain or win; as, to lose a battle, that is, to be defeated.

4. To be deprived of; as, to lose men in battle; to lose an arm or leg by a shot or by amputation; to lose one's life or honor.

5. To forfeit, as a penalty. Our first parents lost the favor of God by their apostasy.

6. To suffer diminution or waste of.

If the salt hath lost its savor, wherewith shall it be salted? Matt. 5.

7. To ruin; to destroy.

The woman that deliberates is lost.

8. To wander from; to miss, so as not to be able to find; as, to lose the way.

9. To bewilder.

Lost in the maze of words.

10. To possess no longer; to be deprived of; contrary to keep; as, to lose a valuable trade.

11. Not to employ or enjoy; to waste. Titus sighed to lose a day.

Th' unhappy have but hours, but these they lose.

12. To waste; to squander; to throw away; as, to lose a fortune by gaming, or by dissipation.

13. To suffer to vanish from view or perception. We lost sight of the land at noon. I lost my companion in the crowd.

Like following life in creatures we dissect, we lost it in the moment we detect.

14. To ruin; to destroy by shipwreck, &c. the albion was lost on the coast of Ireland, april 22, 1822. the admiral lost three ships in a tempest.

15. To cause to perish; as, to be lost at sea.

16. to employ ineffectually; to throw away; to waste. Instruction is often lost on the dull; admonition is lost on the profligate. It is often the fate of projectors to lose their labor.

17. to be freed from.

His scaly back the bunch has got which Edwin lost before.

18. to fail to obtain.

He shall in no wise lose his reward. Matt. 5.

to lose one's self, to be bewildered; also, to slumber; to have the memory and reason suspended.

LOSE, v.i. looz.

1. To forfeit any thing in contest; not to win.

We'll talk with them too, who loses and who wins; who's in, who's out.

2. To decline; to fail.

Wisdom in discourse with her loses discountenanced, and like folly shows.

LOSE, v.i. [loos.]

  1. To forfeit any thing in contest; not to win. We'll talk with them too, / Who loses and who wins; who's in, who's out. – Shak.
  2. To decline; to fail. Wisdom in discourse with her / Loses discountenanced, and like folly shows. – Milton.

LOSE, v.t. [looz; pret. and pp. lost. Sax. losian, forlosian, forlysan; D. verliezen; Goth. liusan. The sense is probably to part, to separate, and from the root of loose.]

  1. To mislay; to part or be separated from a thing, so as to have no knowledge of the place where it is; as, to lose a book or a paper; to lose a record; to lose a dollar or a ducat.
  2. To forfeit by unsuccessful contest; as, to lose money in gaming.
  3. Not to gain or win; as, to lose a battle, that is, to be defeated.
  4. To be deprived of; as, to lose men in battle; to lose an arm or a leg by a shot or by amputation; to lose one's life or honor.
  5. To forfeit, as a penalty. Our first parents lost the favor of God by their apostasy.
  6. To suffer diminution or waste of. If the salt hath lose its savor, wherewith shell it be salted? – Matth. v.
  7. To ruin; to destroy. The woman that deliberates is lost. – Addison.
  8. To wander from; to miss, so as not to be able to find; as, to lose the way.
  9. To bewilder. Lose in the maze of words. – Pope.
  10. To possess do longer; to be deprived of; contrary to, keep; as, to lose a valuable trade.
  11. Not to employ or enjoy; to waste. Titus sighed to lose a day. Th' unhappy have but hours, and these they lose. – Dryden.
  12. To waste; to squander; to throw away; as, to lose a fortune by gaming, or by dissipation.
  13. To suffer to vanish from view or perception. We lost sight of the land at noon. I lost my companion in the crowd. Like following life in creatures we dissect, / We lose it in the moment we detect. – Pope.
  14. To ruin; to destroy by shipwreck, &c. The Albion was lost on the coast of Ireland, April 22, 1822. The admiral lost three ships in a tempest.
  15. To cause to perish; as, to be lost at sea.
  16. To employ ineffectually; to throw away; to waste. Instruction is often lost on the dull; admonition is last on the profligate. It is often the fate of projectors to lose their labor.
  17. To be freed from. His scaly back the bunch has got / Which Edwin lost before. – Parnell.
  18. To fail to obtain. He shalt in no wise lose his reward. Matth. i. To lose one's self, to be bewildered; also, to slumber; to have the memory and reason suspended.

Lose
  1. To part with unintentionally or unwillingly, as by accident, misfortune, negligence, penalty, forfeit, etc.; to be deprived of; as, to lose money from one's purse or pocket, or in business or gaming; to lose an arm or a leg by amputation; to lose men in battle.

    Fair Venus wept the sad disaster
    Of having lost her favorite dove.
    Prior.

  2. To suffer loss, disadvantage, or defeat; to be worse off, esp. as the result of any kind of contest.

    We 'll . . . hear poor rogues
    Talk of court news; and we'll talk with them too,
    Who loses and who wins; who's in, who's out.
    Shak.

  3. To cease to have; to possess no longer; to suffer diminution of; as, to lose one's relish for anything; to lose one's health.

    If the salt hath lost his savor, wherewith shall it be salted ? Matt. v. 13.

  4. Not to employ; to employ ineffectually; to throw away; to waste; to squander; as, to lose a day; to lose the benefits of instruction.

    The unhappy have but hours, and these they lose. Dryden.

  5. To wander from; to miss, so as not to be able to and; to go astray from; as, to lose one's way.

    He hath lost his fellows. Shak

  6. To ruin; to destroy; as destroy; as, the ship was lost on the ledge.

    The woman that deliberates is lost. Addison.

  7. To be deprived of the view of; to cease to see or know the whereabouts of; as, he lost his companion in the crowd.

    Like following life thro' creatures you dissect,
    You lose it in the moment you detect.
    Pope.

  8. To fail to obtain or enjoy; to fail to gain or win; hence, to fail to catch with the mind or senses; to miss; as, I lost a part of what he said.

    He shall in no wise lose his reward. Matt. x. 42.

    I fought the battle bravely which I lost,
    And lost it but to Macedonians.
    Dryden.

  9. To cause to part with; to deprive of.

    [R.]

    How should you go about to lose him a wife he loves with so much passion ? Sir W. Temple.

  10. To prevent from gaining or obtaining.

    O false heart ! thou hadst almost betrayed me to eternal flames, and lost me this glory. Baxter.

    To lose ground, to fall behind; to suffer gradual loss or disadvantage. -- To lose heart, to lose courage; to become timid. "The mutineers lost heart." Macaulay. -- To lose one's head, to be thrown off one's balance; to lose the use of one's good sense or judgment.

    In the excitement of such a discovery, many scholars lost their heads. Whitney.

    -- To lose one's self. (a) To forget or mistake the bearing of surrounding objects; as, to lose one's self in a great city. (b) To have the perceptive and rational power temporarily suspended; as, we lose ourselves in sleep. -- To lose sight of. (a) To cease to see; as, to lose sight of the land. (b) To overlook; to forget; to fail to perceive; as, he lost sight of the issue.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Lose

LOSE, verb transitive looz. preterit tense and participle passive lost.

1. To mislay; to part or be separated from a thing, so as to have no knowledge of the place where it is; as, to lose a book or a paper; to lose a record; to lose a dollar or a ducat.

2. To forfeit by unsuccessful contest; as, to lose money in gaming.

3. Not to gain or win; as, to lose a battle, that is, to be defeated.

4. To be deprived of; as, to lose men in battle; to lose an arm or leg by a shot or by amputation; to lose one's life or honor.

5. To forfeit, as a penalty. Our first parents lost the favor of God by their apostasy.

6. To suffer diminution or waste of.

If the salt hath lost its savor, wherewith shall it be salted? Matthew 5:1.

7. To ruin; to destroy.

The woman that deliberates is lost.

8. To wander from; to miss, so as not to be able to find; as, to lose the way.

9. To bewilder.

Lost in the maze of words.

10. To possess no longer; to be deprived of; contrary to keep; as, to lose a valuable trade.

11. Not to employ or enjoy; to waste. Titus sighed to lose a day.

Th' unhappy have but hours, but these they lose

12. To waste; to squander; to throw away; as, to lose a fortune by gaming, or by dissipation.

13. To suffer to vanish from view or perception. We lost sight of the land at noon. I lost my companion in the crowd.

Like following life in creatures we dissect, we lost it in the moment we detect.

14. To ruin; to destroy by shipwreck, etc. the albion was lost on the coast of Ireland, april 22, 1822. the admiral lost three ships in a tempest.

15. To cause to perish; as, to be lost at sea.

16. to employ ineffectually; to throw away; to waste. Instruction is often lost on the dull; admonition is lost on the profligate. It is often the fate of projectors to lose their labor.

17. to be freed from.

His scaly back the bunch has got which Edwin lost before.

18. to fail to obtain.

He shall in no wise lose his reward. Matthew 5:1.

to lose one's self, to be bewildered; also, to slumber; to have the memory and reason suspended.

LOSE, verb intransitive looz.

1. To forfeit any thing in contest; not to win.

We'll talk with them too, who loses and who wins; who's in, who's out.

2. To decline; to fail.

Wisdom in discourse with her loses discountenanced, and like folly shows.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

ruining

RU'INING, ppr. Demolishing; subverting; destroying; reducing to poverty; bringing to endless misery.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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