HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Friday - July 30, 2021

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [live]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

live

LIVE, v.i. liv.

1. To abide; to dwell; to have settled residence in any place. Where do you live? I live in London. He lives in Philadelphia. He lives in a large house on Second street. The Swiss live on mountains. The Bedouin Arabs live in the dessert.

2. To continue; to be permanent; not to perish.

Men's evil manners live in brass; their virtues we write in water.

3. To be animated; to have the vital principle; to have the bodily functions in operation, or in a capacity to operate, as respiration, circulation of blood, secretions, &c.; applied to animals.

I am Joseph; doth my father yet live? Gen. 45.

4. To have the principles of vegetable life; to be in a state in which the organs do or may perform their functions in the circulation of sap and in growth; applied to plants. This tree will not live, unless watered; it will not live through the winter.

5. To pass life or time in a particular manner, with regard to habits or condition. In what manner does your son live? Does he live according to the dictates of reason and the precepts of religion?

If we act by several broken views, we shall live and die in misery.

6. To continue in life. The way to live long is to be temperate.

7. To live, emphatically; to enjoy life; to be in a state of happiness.

What greater curse could envious fortune give, than just to die, when I began to live?

8. To feed; to subsist; to be nourished and supported in life; as, horses live on grass or grain; fowls live on seeds or insects; some kinds of fish live on others; carnivorous animals live on flesh.

9. To subsist; to be maintained in life; to be supported. Many of the clergy are obliged to live on small salaries. All men in health may live by industry with economy, yet some men live by robbery.

10. To remain undestroyed; to float; not to sink or founder. It must be a good ship that lives at sea in a hurricane.

Nor can our shaken vessels live at sea.

11. To exist; to have being.

As I live, saith the Lord - Ezek. 18.

12. In Scripture, to be exempt from death, temporal or spiritual.

Ye shall therefore keep my statutes and judgments, which if a man do, he shall live in them. Lev. 18.

13. To recover from sickness; to have life prolonged.

Thy son liveth. John 4.

14. To be inwardly quickened, nourished and actuated by divine influence or faith. Gal. 2.

15. To be greatly refreshed, comforted and animated.

For now we live, if ye stand fast in the Lord. 1Thess. 3.

16. To appear as in life or reality; to be manifest in real character.

And all the writer lives in every line.

1. To live with, to dwell or to be a lodger with.

2. To cohabit; to have intercourse, as male and female.

LIVE, v.t. liv.

1. To continue in constantly or habitually; as, to live a life of ease.

2. To act habitually in conformity to.

It is not enough to say prayers, unless they live them too.

LIVE, a.

1. Having life; having respiration and other organic functions in operation, or in a capacity to operate; not dead; as a live ox.

2. Having vegetable life; as a live plant.

3. Containing fire; ignited; not extinct; as a live coal.

4. Vivid, as color.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [live]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

LIVE, v.i. liv.

1. To abide; to dwell; to have settled residence in any place. Where do you live? I live in London. He lives in Philadelphia. He lives in a large house on Second street. The Swiss live on mountains. The Bedouin Arabs live in the dessert.

2. To continue; to be permanent; not to perish.

Men's evil manners live in brass; their virtues we write in water.

3. To be animated; to have the vital principle; to have the bodily functions in operation, or in a capacity to operate, as respiration, circulation of blood, secretions, &c.; applied to animals.

I am Joseph; doth my father yet live? Gen. 45.

4. To have the principles of vegetable life; to be in a state in which the organs do or may perform their functions in the circulation of sap and in growth; applied to plants. This tree will not live, unless watered; it will not live through the winter.

5. To pass life or time in a particular manner, with regard to habits or condition. In what manner does your son live? Does he live according to the dictates of reason and the precepts of religion?

If we act by several broken views, we shall live and die in misery.

6. To continue in life. The way to live long is to be temperate.

7. To live, emphatically; to enjoy life; to be in a state of happiness.

What greater curse could envious fortune give, than just to die, when I began to live?

8. To feed; to subsist; to be nourished and supported in life; as, horses live on grass or grain; fowls live on seeds or insects; some kinds of fish live on others; carnivorous animals live on flesh.

9. To subsist; to be maintained in life; to be supported. Many of the clergy are obliged to live on small salaries. All men in health may live by industry with economy, yet some men live by robbery.

10. To remain undestroyed; to float; not to sink or founder. It must be a good ship that lives at sea in a hurricane.

Nor can our shaken vessels live at sea.

11. To exist; to have being.

As I live, saith the Lord - Ezek. 18.

12. In Scripture, to be exempt from death, temporal or spiritual.

Ye shall therefore keep my statutes and judgments, which if a man do, he shall live in them. Lev. 18.

13. To recover from sickness; to have life prolonged.

Thy son liveth. John 4.

14. To be inwardly quickened, nourished and actuated by divine influence or faith. Gal. 2.

15. To be greatly refreshed, comforted and animated.

For now we live, if ye stand fast in the Lord. 1Thess. 3.

16. To appear as in life or reality; to be manifest in real character.

And all the writer lives in every line.

1. To live with, to dwell or to be a lodger with.

2. To cohabit; to have intercourse, as male and female.

LIVE, v.t. liv.

1. To continue in constantly or habitually; as, to live a life of ease.

2. To act habitually in conformity to.

It is not enough to say prayers, unless they live them too.

LIVE, a.

1. Having life; having respiration and other organic functions in operation, or in a capacity to operate; not dead; as a live ox.

2. Having vegetable life; as a live plant.

3. Containing fire; ignited; not extinct; as a live coal.

4. Vivid, as color.

LIVE, a.

  1. Having life; having respiration and other organic functions in operation, or in a capacity to operate; not dead; as, a live ox.
  2. Having vegetable life; as, a live plant.
  3. Containing fire; ignited; not extinct; as, a live coal.
  4. Vivid, as color. – Thomson.

LIVE, v.i. [liv; Sax. liban, leofan, lifian; Goth. liban; Sw. lefwa; Dan. lever; G. leben; D. lieven. It coincides with leave. The primary sense probably is to rest, remain, abide. If so, the root may be Ar. لَبَّ labba, to be, to abide. Class Lb, No 1.]

  1. To abide; to dwell; to have settled residence in any place. Where do you live? I live in London. He lives in Philadelphia. He lives in a large house in Second street. The Swiss live on mountains. The Bedouin Arabs live in the desert.
  2. To continue; to be permanent; not to perish. Men's evil manners live in brass; their virtues / We write on water. – Shak.
  3. To be animated; to have the vital principle; to have the bodily functions in operation, or in a capacity to operate, as respiration, circulation of blood, secretions, &c.; applied to animals. I am Joseph; doth my father yet live? – Gen. xiv.
  4. To have the principles of vegetable life; to be in a state in which the organs do or may perform their functions in the circulation of sap and in growth; applied to plants. The tree will not live, unless watered; it will not live through the winter.
  5. To pass life or time in a particular manner, with regard to habits or condition. In what manner does your son live? Does he live in ease and affluence? Does he live according to the dictates of reason and the precepts of religion? If we act by several broken views, we shall live and die in misery. – Spectator.
  6. To continue in life. The way to live long is to be temperate.
  7. To live, emphatically; to enjoy life; to be in a state of happiness. What greater curse could envious fortune give, / Than just to die, when I began to live? – Dryden.
  8. To feed; to subsist; to be nourished and supported in life; as, horses live on grass or grain; fowls live on seeds or insects; some kinds of fish live on others; carnivorous animals live on flesh.
  9. To subsist; to be maintained in life; to be supported. Many of the clergy are obliged to live on, small salaries. All men in health may live by industry with economy, yet some men live by robbery.
  10. To remain undestroyed; to float; not to sink or founder. It must be a good ship that lives at sea in a hurricane. Nor can our shaken vessels live at sea. – Dryden.
  11. To exist; to have being. As I live, saith the Lord. Ezek. xxviii.
  12. In Scripture, to be exempt from death, temporal or spiritual. Ye shall therefore keep my statutes and judgments, which if a man do, he shall live in them. Lev. xviii.
  13. To recover from sickness; to have life prolonged. Thy son liveth. – John iv.
  14. To be inwardly quickened, nourished and actuated by divine influence or faith. – Gal. ii.
  15. To be greatly refreshed, comforted and animated. For now we live, if ye stand fast in the Lord. – 1 Thess. iii.
  16. To appear as in life or reality; to be manifest in real character. And all the writer lives in every line. – Pope. To live with, to dwell or to be a lodger with. #2. To cohabit; to have intercourse, as male and female. – Shak. To live down, to live so as to subdue, or to live till subdued. – Burke.

LIVE, v.t. [liv.]

  1. To continue in constantly or habitually; as, to live a life of ease.
  2. To act habitually in conformity to. It is not enough to say prayers, unless they live them too. – Parker.

Live
  1. To be alive; to have life; to have, as an animal or a plant, the capacity of assimilating matter as food, and to be dependent on such assimilation for a continuance of existence; as, animals and plants that live to a great age are long in reaching maturity.

    Thus saith the Lord God unto these bones; Behold, I will . . . lay sinews upon you, and will bring up flesh upon you, and cover you with skin, and put breath in you, and ye shall live. Ezek. xxxvii. 5, 6.

  2. To spend, as one's life; to pass; to maintain; to continue in, constantly or habitually; as, to live an idle or a useful life.
  3. Having life; alive; living; not dead.

    If one man's ox hurt another's, that he die; then they shall sell the live ox, and divide the money of it. Ex. xxi. 35.

  4. Life.

    [Obs.] Chaucer.

    On live, in life; alive. [Obs.] See Alive. Chaucer.

  5. To pass one's time; to pass life or time in a certain manner, as to habits, conduct, or circumstances; as, to live in ease or affluence; to live happily or usefully.

    O death, how bitter is the remembrance of thee to a man that liveth at rest in his possessions! Ecclus. xli. 1.

  6. To act habitually in conformity with; to practice.

    To live the Gospel. Foxe.

    To live down, to live so as to subdue or refute; as, to live down slander.

  7. Being in a state of ignition; burning; having active properties; as, a live coal; live embers.

    " The live ether." Thomson.
  8. To make one's abiding place or home; to abide; to dwell; to reside.

    Jacob lived in the land of Egypt seventeen years. Gen. xlvii. 28.

  9. Full of earnestness; active; wide awake; glowing; as, a live man, or orator.
  10. To be or continue in existence; to exist; to remain; to be permanent; to last; -- said of inanimate objects, ideas, etc.

    Men's evil manners live in brass; their virtues
    We write in water.
    Shak.

  11. Vivid; bright.

    " The live carnation." Thomson.
  12. To enjoy or make the most of life; to be in a state of happiness.

    What greater curse could envious fortune give
    Than just to die when I began to live?
    Dryden.

  13. Imparting power; having motion; as, the live spindle of a lathe.

    Live birth, the condition of being born in such a state that acts of life are manifested after the extrusion of the whole body. Dunglison. -- Live box, a cell for holding living objects under microscopical examination. P. H. Gosse. -- Live feathers, feathers which have been plucked from the living bird, and are therefore stronger and more elastic. -- Live gang. (Sawing) See under Gang. -- Live grass (Bot.), a grass of the genus Eragrostis. -- Live load (Engin.), a suddenly applied load; a varying load; a moving load; as a moving train of cars on a bridge, or wind pressure on a roof. Live oak (Bot.), a species of oak (Quercus virens), growing in the Southern States, of great durability, and highly esteemed for ship timber. In California the Q. chrysolepis and some other species are also called live oaks. -- Live ring (Engin.), a circular train of rollers upon which a swing bridge, or turntable, rests, and which travels around a circular track when the bridge or table turns. -- Live steam , steam direct from the boiler, used for any purpose, in distinction from exhaust steam. -- Live stock, horses, cattle, and other domestic animals kept on a farm.

  14. To feed; to subsist; to be nourished or supported; -- with on; as, horses live on grass and grain.
  15. To have a spiritual existence; to be quickened, nourished, and actuated by divine influence or faith.

    The just shall live by faith. Gal. iii. ll.

  16. To be maintained in life; to acquire a livelihood; to subsist; -- with on or by; as, to live on spoils.

    Those who live by labor. Sir W. Temple.

  17. To outlast danger; to float; -- said of a ship, boat, etc.; as, no ship could live in such a storm.

    A strong mast that lived upon the sea. Shak.

    To live out, to be at service; to live away from home as a servant. [U. S.] -- To live with. (a) To dwell or to be a lodger with. (b) To cohabit with; to have intercourse with, as male with female.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

109

770

89

841

134

864
Live

LIVE, verb intransitive liv.

1. To abide; to dwell; to have settled residence in any place. Where do you live? I live in London. He lives in Philadelphia. He lives in a large house on Second street. The Swiss live on mountains. The Bedouin Arabs live in the dessert.

2. To continue; to be permanent; not to perish.

Men's evil manners live in brass; their virtues we write in water.

3. To be animated; to have the vital principle; to have the bodily functions in operation, or in a capacity to operate, as respiration, circulation of blood, secretions, etc.; applied to animals.

I am Joseph; doth my father yet live? Genesis 45:3.

4. To have the principles of vegetable life; to be in a state in which the organs do or may perform their functions in the circulation of sap and in growth; applied to plants. This tree will not live unless watered; it will not live through the winter.

5. To pass life or time in a particular manner, with regard to habits or condition. In what manner does your son live? Does he live according to the dictates of reason and the precepts of religion?

If we act by several broken views, we shall live and die in misery.

6. To continue in life. The way to live long is to be temperate.

7. To live emphatically; to enjoy life; to be in a state of happiness.

What greater curse could envious fortune give, than just to die, when I began to live?

8. To feed; to subsist; to be nourished and supported in life; as, horses live on grass or grain; fowls live on seeds or insects; some kinds of fish live on others; carnivorous animals live on flesh.

9. To subsist; to be maintained in life; to be supported. Many of the clergy are obliged to live on small salaries. All men in health may live by industry with economy, yet some men live by robbery.

10. To remain undestroyed; to float; not to sink or founder. It must be a good ship that lives at sea in a hurricane.

Nor can our shaken vessels live at sea.

11. To exist; to have being.

As I live saith the Lord - Ezekiel 18:3.

12. In Scripture, to be exempt from death, temporal or spiritual.

Ye shall therefore keep my statutes and judgments, which if a man do, he shall live in them. Leviticus 18:5.

13. To recover from sickness; to have life prolonged.

Thy son liveth. John 4:1.

14. To be inwardly quickened, nourished and actuated by divine influence or faith. Galatians 2:14.

15. To be greatly refreshed, comforted and animated.

For now we live if ye stand fast in the Lord. 1 Thessalonians 3:8.

16. To appear as in life or reality; to be manifest in real character.

And all the writer lives in every line.

1. To live with, to dwell or to be a lodger with.

2. To cohabit; to have intercourse, as male and female.

LIVE, verb transitive liv.

1. To continue in constantly or habitually; as, to live a life of ease.

2. To act habitually in conformity to.

It is not enough to say prayers, unless they live them too.

LIVE, adjective

1. Having life; having respiration and other organic functions in operation, or in a capacity to operate; not dead; as a live ox.

2. Having vegetable life; as a live plant.

3. Containing fire; ignited; not extinct; as a live coal.

4. Vivid, as color.

Why 1828?

0
3
 


Because the dilution and degradation of the English language has contributed to the moral decay and misunderstandings that have permeated our laisse faire culture putting America in great danger. We have gone from a great nation to a mediocre people.

— Peter (Champaign, IL)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

affective

AFFECT'IVE, a. That affects, or excites emotion; suited to affect. [Little used.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

249

434

Compact Edition

233

180

CD-ROM

191

143

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.314 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top