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Monday - July 13, 2020

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [lichen]

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lichen

LICH'EN, n. [L. from Gr.]

1. In botany, the name for an extensive division of cryptogamian plants, constituting a genus in the order of Algae, in the Linnean system, but now forming a distinct natural order. They appear in the form of thin flat crust, covering rocks and the bark of trees, or in foliaceous expansions, or branched like a shrub in miniature, or sometimes only as a gelatinous mass, or a powdery substance. They are called rock moss and tree moss, and some of the liverworts are of this order. They also include the Iceland moss and the reindeer moss; but they are entirely distinct from the true mosses (Musci.)

2. In surgery, a species of impetigo, appearing in the form of a red, dry, rough, and somewhat prurient spot, that gives off small furfuraceous scales.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [lichen]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

LICH'EN, n. [L. from Gr.]

1. In botany, the name for an extensive division of cryptogamian plants, constituting a genus in the order of Algae, in the Linnean system, but now forming a distinct natural order. They appear in the form of thin flat crust, covering rocks and the bark of trees, or in foliaceous expansions, or branched like a shrub in miniature, or sometimes only as a gelatinous mass, or a powdery substance. They are called rock moss and tree moss, and some of the liverworts are of this order. They also include the Iceland moss and the reindeer moss; but they are entirely distinct from the true mosses (Musci.)

2. In surgery, a species of impetigo, appearing in the form of a red, dry, rough, and somewhat prurient spot, that gives off small furfuraceous scales.

LICH'EN, n. [L. from Gr. κειχην.]

  1. In botany, the name for an extensive division of cryptogamian plants, constituting a genus in the order of Algæ in the Linnean system, but now forming a distinct natural order. They appear in the form of thin flat crusts, covering rocks and the bark of trees, or in foliaceous expansions, or branched like a shrub in miniature, or sometimes only as a gelatinous mass, or a powdery substance. They are called rock moss and tree moss, and some of the liverworts are of this order. They also include the Iceland moss and the reindeer moss; but they are entirely distinct from the true mosses (Musci.) – Ed. Encyc.
  2. In medicine, a papular cutaneous eruption consisting of diffuse red pimples, which are attended with a trouble some sense of tingling and pricking. A common variety of this affection resembles the effect of stinging with nettles, and is called nettle-lichen.

Li"chen
  1. One of a class of cellular, flowerless plants, (technically called Lichenes), having no distinction of leaf and stem, usually of scaly, expanded, frond-like forms, but sometimes erect or pendulous and variously branched. They derive their nourishment from the air, and generate by means of spores. The species are very widely distributed, and form irregular spots or patches, usually of a greenish or yellowish color, upon rocks, trees, and various bodies, to which they adhere with great tenacity. They are often improperly called rock moss or tree moss.

    * A favorite modern theory of lichens (called after its inventor the Schwendener hypothesis), is that they are not autonomous plants, but that they consist of ascigerous fungi, parasitic on algæ. Each lichen is composed of white filaments and green, or greenish, rounded cells, and it is argued that the two are of different nature, the one living at the expense of the other. See Hyphæ, and Gonidia.

  2. A name given to several varieties of skin disease, esp. to one characterized by the eruption of small, conical or flat, reddish pimples, which, if unchecked, tend to spread and produce great and even fatal exhaustion.
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Lichen

LICH'EN, noun [Latin from Gr.]

1. In botany, the name for an extensive division of cryptogamian plants, constituting a genus in the order of Algae, in the Linnean system, but now forming a distinct natural order. They appear in the form of thin flat crust, covering rocks and the bark of trees, or in foliaceous expansions, or branched like a shrub in miniature, or sometimes only as a gelatinous mass, or a powdery substance. They are called rock moss and tree moss, and some of the liverworts are of this order. They also include the Iceland moss and the reindeer moss; but they are entirely distinct from the true mosses (Musci.)

2. In surgery, a species of impetigo, appearing in the form of a red, dry, rough, and somewhat prurient spot, that gives off small furfuraceous scales.

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Help comprehend meaning of words to get full understanding of bible verses

— Becky (Delevan, NY)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

rub

RUB, v.t. [L. probrum, exprobro; Gr. to rub. We have the elements of the word in scrape, scrub, L. scribo, Gr.]

1. To move something along the surface of a body with pressure; as, to rub the face or arms with the hand; to rub the body with flannel. Vessels are scoured or cleaned by rubbing them.

2. To wipe; to clean; to scour; but rub is a generic term, applicable to friction for every purpose.

3. To touch so as to leave behind something which touches; to spread over; as to rub any thing with oil.

4. To polish; to retouch; with over.

The whole business of our redemption is to rub over the defaced copy of the creation.

5. To obstruct by collision. [Unusual.]

In popular language, rub is used for teasing, fretting, upbraiding, reproaching or vexing with gibes or sarcasms.

To rub down, to clean by rubbing; to comb or curry, as a horse.

To rub off, to clean any thing by rubbing; to separate by friction; as, to rub off rust.

1. To rub out, to erase; to obliterate; as, to rub out marks or letters.

2. To remove or separate by friction; as, to rub out a stain.

To rub upon, to touch hard.

1. To rub up, to burnish; to polish; to clean.

2. To excite; to awaken; to rouse to action; as, to rub up the memory.

RUB, v.i.

1. To move along the surface of a body with pressure; as, a wheel rubs against the gate-post.

2. To fret; to chafe; as, to rub upon a sore.

3. To move or pass with difficulty; as, to rub through woods, as huntsmen; to rub through the world.

RUB, n.

1. The act of rubbing; friction.

2. That which renders motion or progress difficult; collision; hinderance; obstruction.

Now every rub is smoothed in our way.

Upon this rub the English embassadors thought fit to demur.

All sort of rubs will be laid in the way.

3. Inequality of ground that hinders the motion of a bowl.

4. Difficulty; cause of uneasiness; pinch.

To sleep, perchance to dream; ay, there's the rub.

5. Sarcasm; joke; something grating to the feelings.

RUB,

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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