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Tuesday - July 23, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [league]

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league

LEAGUE, n. leeg. [L. ligo, to bind.]

1. An alliance or confederacy between princes or states for their mutual aid or defense; a national contract or compact. A league may be offensive or defensive, or both. It is offensive, when the contracting parties agree to unite in attacking a common enemy; defensive, when the parties agree to act in concert in defending each other against an enemy.

2. A combination or union of two or more parties for the purpose of maintaining friendship and promoting their mutual interest, or for executing any design in concert.

And let there be 'twixt us and them no league, nor amity.

LEAGUE, v.i. leeg.

1. To unite, as princes or states in a contract of amity for mutual aid or defense; to confederate. Russia and Austria leagued to oppose the ambition of Buonaparte.

2. To unite or confederate, as private persons for mutual aid.

LEAGUE, n. leeg. [Low L. leuca.]

1. Originally, a stone erected on the public roads, at certain distances, in the manner of the modern mile-stones. Hence,

2. The distance between two stones. With the English and Americans, a league is the length of three miles; but this measure is chiefly at sea. The league on the continent of Europe, is very different among different nations. The Dutch and German league contains four geographical miles.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [league]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

LEAGUE, n. leeg. [L. ligo, to bind.]

1. An alliance or confederacy between princes or states for their mutual aid or defense; a national contract or compact. A league may be offensive or defensive, or both. It is offensive, when the contracting parties agree to unite in attacking a common enemy; defensive, when the parties agree to act in concert in defending each other against an enemy.

2. A combination or union of two or more parties for the purpose of maintaining friendship and promoting their mutual interest, or for executing any design in concert.

And let there be 'twixt us and them no league, nor amity.

LEAGUE, v.i. leeg.

1. To unite, as princes or states in a contract of amity for mutual aid or defense; to confederate. Russia and Austria leagued to oppose the ambition of Buonaparte.

2. To unite or confederate, as private persons for mutual aid.

LEAGUE, n. leeg. [Low L. leuca.]

1. Originally, a stone erected on the public roads, at certain distances, in the manner of the modern mile-stones. Hence,

2. The distance between two stones. With the English and Americans, a league is the length of three miles; but this measure is chiefly at sea. The league on the continent of Europe, is very different among different nations. The Dutch and German league contains four geographical miles.

LEAGUE, n. [leeg; Fr. ligue; It. lega; Sp. liga; from L. ligo, to bind.]

  1. An alliance or confederacy between princes or states for their mutual aid or defense; a national contract or compact. A league may ho offensive or defensive, or both. It is offensive, when the contracting parties agree to unite in attacking a common enemy; defensive, when the parties agree to act in concert in defending each other against an enemy.
  2. A combination or union of two or more parties for the purpose of maintaining friendship and promoting their mutual interest, or for executing any design in concert. And let there be / 'Twixt us and them no league, nor amity. – Denham.

LEAGUE, n. [leeg; of Celtic origin. W. llec, a flat stone, whence Low L. leuca, Sp. legua, It. lega, Fr. licue, Ir. leac. It appears from the Welsh, that this word is from the root of lay.]

  1. Originally, a stone erected on the public roads, at certain distances, in the manner of the modern mile-stones. Hence,
  2. The distance between two stones. With the English and Americans, a league is the length of three miles; but this measure is used chiefly at sea. The league on the continent of Europe, is very different among different nations. The Dutch and German league contains four geographical miles. – Encyc.

LEAGUE, v.i. [leeg.]

  1. To unite, as princes or states in a contract of amity for mutual aid or defense; to confederate. Russia and Austria leagued to oppose the ambition of Buonaparte.
  2. To unite or confederate, as private persons for mutual aid.

League
  1. A measure of length or distance, varying in different countries from about 2.4 to 4.6 English statute miles of 5,280 feet each, and used (as a land measure) chiefly on the continent of Europe, and in the Spanish parts of America. The marine league of England and the United States is equal to three marine, or geographical, miles of 6080 feet each.

    &fist] The English land league is equal to three English statute miles. The Spanish and French leagues vary in each country according to usage and the kind of measurement to which they are applied. The Dutch and German leagues contain about four geographical miles, or about 4.6 English statute miles.

  2. An alliance or combination of two or more nations, parties, or persons, for the accomplishment of a purpose which requires a continued course of action, as for mutual defense, or for furtherance of commercial, religious, or political interests, etc.

    And let there be
    'Twixt us and them no league, nor amity.
    Denham.

    * A league may be offensive or defensive, or both; offensive, when the parties agree to unite in attacking a common enemy; defensive, when they agree to a mutual defense of each other against an enemy.

    The Holy League, an alliance of Roman Catholics formed in 1576 by influence of the Duke of Guise for the exclusion of Protestants from the throne of France. -- Solemn League and Covenant. See Covenant,2. -- The land league, an association, organized in Dublin in 1879, to promote the interests of the Irish tenantry, its avowed objects being to secure fixity of tenure, fair rent, and free sale of the tenants' interest. It was declared illegal by Parliament, but vigorous prosecutions have failed to suppress it.

    Syn. -- Alliance; confederacy; confederation; coalition; combination; compact; coöperation.

  3. To unite in a league or confederacy] to combine for mutual support; to confederate.

    South.
  4. To join in a league; to cause to combine for a joint purpose; to combine; to unite; as, common interests will league heterogeneous elements.
  5. A stone erected near a public road to mark the distance of a league.

    [Obs.]
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League

LEAGUE, noun leeg. [Latin ligo, to bind.]

1. An alliance or confederacy between princes or states for their mutual aid or defense; a national contract or compact. A league may be offensive or defensive, or both. It is offensive, when the contracting parties agree to unite in attacking a common enemy; defensive, when the parties agree to act in concert in defending each other against an enemy.

2. A combination or union of two or more parties for the purpose of maintaining friendship and promoting their mutual interest, or for executing any design in concert.

And let there be 'twixt us and them no league nor amity.

LEAGUE, verb intransitive leeg.

1. To unite, as princes or states in a contract of amity for mutual aid or defense; to confederate. Russia and Austria leagued to oppose the ambition of Buonaparte.

2. To unite or confederate, as private persons for mutual aid.

LEAGUE, noun leeg. [Low Latin leuca.]

1. Originally, a stone erected on the public roads, at certain distances, in the manner of the modern mile-stones. Hence,

2. The distance between two stones. With the English and Americans, a league is the length of three miles; but this measure is chiefly at sea. The league on the continent of Europe, is very different among different nations. The Dutch and German league contains four geographical miles.

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Want a Christian perspective on the definition of words

— Matthew (Holland, MI)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

sulphuret

SUL'PHURET, n. A combination of sulphur with a metallic, earthy or alkaline base; as a sulphuret of potash.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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