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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [land]

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land

LAND, n.

1. Earth, or the solid matter which constitutes the fixed part of the surface of the globe, in distinction from the sea or other waters, which constitute the fluid or movable part. Hence we say, the globe is terraqueous, consisting of land and water. The seaman in a long voyage longs to see land.

2. Any portion of the solid, superficial part of the globe, whether a kingdom or country, or a particular region. The United States is denominated the land of freedom.

Go, view the land, even Jericho. Josh. 2.

3. Any small portion of the superficial part of the earth or ground. We speak of the quantity of land in a manor. Five hundred acres of land is a large farm.

4. Ground; soil, or the superficial part of the earth in respect to its nature or quality; as good land; poor land; moist or dry land.

5. Real Estate. A traitor forfeits all his lands and tenements.

6. The inhabitants of a country or region; a nation or people.

These answers in the silent night received, the king himself divulged, the land believed.

7. The ground left unplowed between furrows, is by some of our farmers called a land.

To make the land,

To make land, In seaman's language, is to discover land from sea, as the ship approaches it.

To shut in the land, to lose sight of the land left, by the intervention of a point or promontory.

To set the land, to see by the compass how it bears from the ship.

LAND, n. Urine; whence the old expression, land dam, to kill. Obs.

LAND, v.t. to set on shore; to disembark; to debark; as, to land troops from a ship or boat; to land goods.

LAND, v.i. To go on shore from a ship or boat; to disembark.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [land]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

LAND, n.

1. Earth, or the solid matter which constitutes the fixed part of the surface of the globe, in distinction from the sea or other waters, which constitute the fluid or movable part. Hence we say, the globe is terraqueous, consisting of land and water. The seaman in a long voyage longs to see land.

2. Any portion of the solid, superficial part of the globe, whether a kingdom or country, or a particular region. The United States is denominated the land of freedom.

Go, view the land, even Jericho. Josh. 2.

3. Any small portion of the superficial part of the earth or ground. We speak of the quantity of land in a manor. Five hundred acres of land is a large farm.

4. Ground; soil, or the superficial part of the earth in respect to its nature or quality; as good land; poor land; moist or dry land.

5. Real Estate. A traitor forfeits all his lands and tenements.

6. The inhabitants of a country or region; a nation or people.

These answers in the silent night received, the king himself divulged, the land believed.

7. The ground left unplowed between furrows, is by some of our farmers called a land.

To make the land,

To make land, In seaman's language, is to discover land from sea, as the ship approaches it.

To shut in the land, to lose sight of the land left, by the intervention of a point or promontory.

To set the land, to see by the compass how it bears from the ship.

LAND, n. Urine; whence the old expression, land dam, to kill. Obs.

LAND, v.t. to set on shore; to disembark; to debark; as, to land troops from a ship or boat; to land goods.

LAND, v.i. To go on shore from a ship or boat; to disembark.


LAND, n.1 [Sax. land; Goth. G. D. Dan. and Sw. land. I suppose this to be the W. llan, a clear place or area, and the same as lawn; Cantabrian, landa, a plain or field, It. and Sp. landa. The final d is probably adventitious. The primary sense is a lay or spread. Class Ln.]

  1. Earth, or the solid matter which constitutes the fixed part of the surface of the globe, in distinction from the sea or other waters, which constitute the fluid or movable part. Hence we say, the globe is terraqueous, consisting of land and water. The seaman in a long voyage longs to see land.
  2. Any portion of the solid, superficial part of the globe, whether a kingdom or country, or a particular region. The United States are denominated the land of freedom. Go, view the land, even Jericho. – Josh. ii.
  3. Any small portion of the superficial part of the earth or ground. We speak of the quantity of land in a manor. Five hundred acres of land is a large farm.
  4. Ground; soil, or the superficial part of the earth in respect to its nature or quality; as, good land; poor land; moist or dry land.
  5. Real estate. A traitor forfeits all his lands and tenements.
  6. The inhabitants of a country or region; a nation or people. These answers in the silent night received, / The king himself divulged, the land believed. – Dryden.
  7. The ground left unplowed between furrows, is by farmers called a land. To make the land, or To make land, In seamen's language, is to discover land from the sea, as the ship approaches it. To shut in the land, to lose sight of the land left, by the intervention of a point or promontory. To set the land, to see by the compass how it bears from the ship.

LAND, n.2 [Sax. hland or hlond.]

Urine; whence the old expression, land dam, to kill. [Obs.] Shak.


LAND, v.i.

To go on shore from a ship or boat; to disembark.


LAND, v.t.

To set on shore; to disembark; to debark; as, to land troops from a ship or boat; to land goods.


Land
  1. Urine. See Lant.

    [Obs.]
  2. The solid part of the surface of the earth; - - opposed to water as constituting a part of such surface, especially to oceans and seas; as, to sight land after a long voyage.

    They turn their heads to sea, their sterns to land. Dryden.

  3. To set or put on shore from a ship or other water craft] to disembark; to debark.

    I 'll undertake to land them on our coast. Shak.

  4. To go on shore from a ship or boat; to disembark; to come to the end of a course.
  5. Any portion, large or small, of the surface of the earth, considered by itself, or as belonging to an individual or a people, as a country, estate, farm, or tract.

    Go view the land, even Jericho. Josh. ii. 1.

    Ill fares the land, to hastening ills a prey,
    Where wealth accumulates and men decay.
    Goldsmith.

    * In the expressions "to be, or dwell, upon land," "to go, or fare, on land," as used by Chaucer, land denotes the country as distinguished from the town.

    A poor parson dwelling upon land [i.e., in the country]. Chaucer.

  6. To catch and bring to shore; to capture; as, to land a fish.
  7. Ground, in respect to its nature or quality; soil; as, wet land; good or bad land.
  8. To set down after conveying; to cause to fall, alight, or reach; to bring to the end of a course; as, he landed the quoit near the stake; to be thrown from a horse and landed in the mud; to land one in difficulties or mistakes.
  9. The inhabitants of a nation or people.

    These answers, in the silent night received,
    The king himself divulged, the land believed.
    Dryden.

  10. The mainland, in distinction from islands.
  11. The ground or floor.

    [Obs.]

    Herself upon the land she did prostrate. Spenser.

  12. The ground left unplowed between furrows; any one of several portions into which a field is divided for convenience in plowing.
  13. Any ground, soil, or earth whatsoever, as meadows, pastures, woods, etc., and everything annexed to it, whether by nature, as trees, water, etc., or by the hand of man, as buildings, fences, etc.; real estate.

    Kent. Bouvier. Burrill.
  14. The lap of the strakes in a clinker-built boat; the lap of plates in an iron vessel; -- called also landing.

    Knight.
  15. In any surface prepared with indentations, perforations, or grooves, that part of the surface which is not so treated, as the level part of a millstone between the furrows, or the surface of the bore of a rifled gun between the grooves.

    Land agent, a person employed to sell or let land, to collect rents, and to attend to other money matters connected with land. -- Land boat, a vehicle on wheels propelled by sails. -- Land blink, a peculiar atmospheric brightness seen from sea over distant snow-covered land in arctic regions. See Ice blink. -- Land breeze. See under Breeze. -- Land chain. See Gunter's chain. -- Land crab (Zoöl.), any one of various species of crabs which live much on the land, and resort to the water chiefly for the purpose of breeding. They are abundant in the West Indies and South America. Some of them grow to a large size. -- Land fish a fish on land; a person quite out of place. Shak. -- Land force, a military force serving on land, as distinguished from a naval force. -- Land, ho! (Naut.), a sailor's cry in announcing sight of land. -- Land ice, a field of ice adhering to the coast, in distinction from a floe. -- Land leech (Zoöl.), any one of several species of blood-sucking leeches, which, in moist, tropical regions, live on land, and are often troublesome to man and beast. -- Land measure, the system of measurement used in determining the area of land; also, a table of areas used in such measurement. -- Land, or House, of bondage, in Bible history, Egypt; by extension, a place or condition of special oppression. -- Land o' cakes, Scotland. -- Land of Nod, sleep. -- Land of promise, in Bible history, Canaan: by extension, a better country or condition of which one has expectation. -- Land of steady habits, a nickname sometimes given to the State of Connecticut. -- Land office, a government office in which the entries upon, and sales of, public land are registered, and other business respecting the public lands is transacted. [U.S.] -- Land pike. (Zoöl.) (a) The gray pike, or sauger. (b) The Menobranchus. -- Land service, military service as distinguished from naval service. -- Land rail. (Zoöl) (a) The crake or corncrake of Europe. See Crake. (b) An Australian rail (Hypotænidia Phillipensis); -- called also pectoral rail. -- Land scrip, a certificate that the purchase money for a certain portion of the public land has been paid to the officer entitled to receive it. [U.S.] -- Land shark, a swindler of sailors on shore. [Sailors' Cant] -- Land side (a) That side of anything in or on the sea, as of an island or ship, which is turned toward the land. (b) The side of a plow which is opposite to the moldboard and which presses against the unplowed land. -- Land snail (Zoöl.), any snail which lives on land, as distinguished from the aquatic snails are Pulmonifera, and belong to the Geophila; but the operculated land snails of warm countries are Diœcia, and belong to the Tænioglossa. See Geophila, and Helix. -- Land spout, a descent of cloud and water in a conical form during the occurrence of a tornado and heavy rainfall on land. - - Land steward, a person who acts for another in the management of land, collection of rents, etc. -- Land tortoise, Land turtle (Zoöl.), any tortoise that habitually lives on dry land, as the box tortoise. See Tortoise. -- Land warrant, a certificate from the Land Office, authorizing a person to assume ownership of a public land. [U.S.] -- Land wind. Same as Land breeze (above). -- To make land (Naut.), to sight land. To set the land, to see by the compass how the land bears from the ship. -- To shut in the land, to hide the land, as when fog, or an intervening island, obstructs the view.

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Land

LAND, noun

1. Earth, or the solid matter which constitutes the fixed part of the surface of the globe, in distinction from the sea or other waters, which constitute the fluid or movable part. Hence we say, the globe is terraqueous, consisting of land and water. The seaman in a long voyage longs to see land

2. Any portion of the solid, superficial part of the globe, whether a kingdom or country, or a particular region. The United States is denominated the land of freedom.

Go, view the land even Jericho. Joshua 2:1.

3. Any small portion of the superficial part of the earth or ground. We speak of the quantity of land in a manor. Five hundred acres of land is a large farm.

4. Ground; soil, or the superficial part of the earth in respect to its nature or quality; as good land; poor land; moist or dry land

5. Real Estate. A traitor forfeits all his lands and tenements.

6. The inhabitants of a country or region; a nation or people.

These answers in the silent night received, the king himself divulged, the land believed.

7. The ground left unplowed between furrows, is by some of our farmers called a land

To make the land

To make land In seaman's language, is to discover land from sea, as the ship approaches it.

To shut in the land to lose sight of the land left, by the intervention of a point or promontory.

To set the land to see by the compass how it bears from the ship.

LAND, noun Urine; whence the old expression, land dam, to kill. obsolete

LAND, verb transitive to set on shore; to disembark; to debark; as, to land troops from a ship or boat; to land goods.

LAND, verb intransitive To go on shore from a ship or boat; to disembark.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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prefatory

PREF'ATORY, a. Pertaining to a preface; introductory to a book, essay or discourse.

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