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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [just]

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just

JUST, a. [L. justus. The primary sense is probably straight or close, from the sense of setting, erecting, or extending.]

1. Regular; orderly; due; suitable.

When all

The war shall stand ranged in its just array.

2. Exactly proportioned; proper.

Pleaseth your lordship

To meet his grace,just distance 'tween our armies?

3. Full; complete to the common standard.

He was a comely personage, a little above just stature.

4. Full; true; a sense allied to the preceding, or the same.

--So that once the skirmish was like to have come to a just battle.

5. In a moral sense, upright; honest; having principles of rectitude; or conforming exactly to the laws, and to principles of rectitude in social conduct; equitable in the distribution of justice; as a just judge.

6. In an evangelical sense, righteous; religious; influenced by a regard to the laws of God; or living in exact conformity to the divine will.

There is not a just man on earth, that doeth good, and sinneth not. Eccles.7.

7. Conformed to rules of justice; doing equal justice.

Just balances, just weights, a just ephah and a just him shall ye have. Lev.19.

8. Conformed to truth; exact; proper; accurate; as just thoughts; just expressions; just images or representations; a just description; a just inference.

9. True; founded in truth and fact; as a just charge or accusation.

10. Innocent; blameless; without guilt.

How should man be just with God? Job.9.

11. Equitable; due; merited; as a just recompense or reward.

--Whose damnation is just. Rom.3.

12. True to promises; faithful; as just to one's word or engagements.

13. Impartial; allowing what is due; giving fair representation of character, merit or demerit.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [just]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

JUST, a. [L. justus. The primary sense is probably straight or close, from the sense of setting, erecting, or extending.]

1. Regular; orderly; due; suitable.

When all

The war shall stand ranged in its just array.

2. Exactly proportioned; proper.

Pleaseth your lordship

To meet his grace,just distance 'tween our armies?

3. Full; complete to the common standard.

He was a comely personage, a little above just stature.

4. Full; true; a sense allied to the preceding, or the same.

--So that once the skirmish was like to have come to a just battle.

5. In a moral sense, upright; honest; having principles of rectitude; or conforming exactly to the laws, and to principles of rectitude in social conduct; equitable in the distribution of justice; as a just judge.

6. In an evangelical sense, righteous; religious; influenced by a regard to the laws of God; or living in exact conformity to the divine will.

There is not a just man on earth, that doeth good, and sinneth not. Eccles.7.

7. Conformed to rules of justice; doing equal justice.

Just balances, just weights, a just ephah and a just him shall ye have. Lev.19.

8. Conformed to truth; exact; proper; accurate; as just thoughts; just expressions; just images or representations; a just description; a just inference.

9. True; founded in truth and fact; as a just charge or accusation.

10. Innocent; blameless; without guilt.

How should man be just with God? Job.9.

11. Equitable; due; merited; as a just recompense or reward.

--Whose damnation is just. Rom.3.

12. True to promises; faithful; as just to one's word or engagements.

13. Impartial; allowing what is due; giving fair representation of character, merit or demerit.


JUST, a. [Fr. juste; Sp. justo; It. giusto; L. justus. The primary sense is probably straight or close, from the sense of setting, erecting, or extending.]

  1. Regular; orderly; due; suitable. When all / The war shall stand ranged in its just array. – Addison.
  2. Exactly proportioned; proper. Pleaseth your lordship / To meet his grace, just distance 'tween our armies? – Shak.
  3. Full; complete to the common standard. He was comely personage, a little above just stature. – Bacon.
  4. Full; true; a sense allied to the preceding, or the same. So that once the skirmish was like to have come to a just battle. – Knolles.
  5. In a moral sense, upright; honest; having principles of rectitude; or conforming exactly to the laws, and to principles of rectitude in social conduct; equitable in the distribution of justice; as, a just judge.
  6. In an evangelical sense, righteous; religious; influenced by a regard to the laws of God; or living in exact conformity to the divine will. There is not a just man on earth, that doeth good, and sinneth not. – Eccles. vii.
  7. Conformed to rules of justice; doing equal justice. Just balances, just weights, a just ephah and a just hin shall ye have. – Lev. xix.
  8. Conformed to truth; exact; proper; accurate; as just thoughts; just expressions; just images or representations; a just description; a just inference.
  9. True; founded in truth and fact; as, a just charge or accusation.
  10. Innocent; blameless; without guilt. How should man be just with God? – Job ix.
  11. Equitable; due; merited; as, a just recompense or reward. Whose damnation is just. – Rom. iii.
  12. True to promises; faithful; as, just to one's word or engagements.
  13. Impartial; allowing what is due; giving fair representation of character, merit or demerit.

JUST, adv.

  1. Close or closely; near or nearly, in place. He stood just by the speaker, and heard what he said. He stood just at the entrance of the city.
  2. Near or nearly in time; almost. Just at that moment he arose and fled.
  3. Exactly; nicely; accurately. They remain just of the same opinion. 'Tis with our judgments as our watches; none / Go just alike, yet each believes his own. – Pope.
  4. Merely; barely; exactly. And having just enough, not covet more. – Dryden.
  5. Narrowly. He just escaped without injury.

JUST, n. [Fr. jouste, now joute; Sp. justa; Port. id.; It. giostra; probably from the root of jostle or justle. The primary sense is to thrust, to drive, to push.]

A mock encounter on horseback; a combat for sport or for exercise, in which the combatants pushed with lances and swords, man to man, in mock fight; a tilt; one of the exercises at tournaments. – Encyc.


JUST, v.i. [Fr. jouter; Sp. and Port. justar; It. giostrare.]

  1. To engage in mock fight on horseback.
  2. To push; to drive; to justle.

Just
  1. Conforming or conformable to rectitude or justice; not doing wrong to any; violating no right or obligation; upright; righteous; honest; true; -- said both of persons and things.

    "O just but severe law!" Shak.

    There is not a just man upon earth, that doeth good, and sinneth not. Eccl. vii. 20.

    Just balances, just weights, . . . shall ye have. Lev. xix. 36.

    How should man be just with God? Job ix. 2.

    We know your grace to be a man.
    Just and upright.
    Shak.

  2. Precisely; exactly; -- in place, time, or degree; neither more nor less than is stated.

    And having just enough, not covet more. Dryden.

    The god Pan guided my hand just to the heart of the beast. Sir P. Sidney.

    To-night, at Herne's oak, just 'twixt twelve and one. Shak.

  3. To joust.

    Fairfax.
  4. A joust.

    Dryden.
  5. Not transgressing the requirement of truth and propriety; conformed to the truth of things, to reason, or to a proper standard; exact; normal; reasonable; regular; due; as, a just statement; a just inference.

    Just of thy word, in every thought sincere. Pope.

    The prince is here at hand: pleaseth your lordship
    To meet his grace just distance 'tween our armies.
    Shak.

    He was a comely personage, a little above just stature. Bacon.

    Fire fitted with just materials casts a constant heat. Jer. Taylor.

    When all
    The war shall stand ranged in its just array.
    Addison.

    Their named alone would make a just volume. Burton.

  6. Closely; nearly; almost.

    Just at the point of death. Sir W. Temple.

  7. Rendering or disposed to render to each one his due; equitable; fair; impartial; as, just judge.

    Men are commonly so just to virtue and goodness as to praise it in others, even when they do not practice it themselves. Tillotson.

    Just intonation. (Mus.) (a) The correct sounding of notes or intervals; true pitch. (b) The giving all chords and intervals in their purity or their exact mathematical ratio, or without temperament; a process in which the number of notes and intervals required in the various keys is much greater than the twelve to the octave used in systems of temperament. H. W. Poole.

    Syn. -- Equitable; upright; honest; true; fair; impartial; proper; exact; normal; orderly; regular.

  8. Barely; merely; scarcely; only; by a very small space or time; as, he just missed the train; just too late.

    A soft Etesian gale
    But just inspired and gently swelled the sail.
    Dryden.

    Just now, the least possible time since; a moment ago.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Just

JUST, adjective [Latin justus. The primary sense is probably straight or close, from the sense of setting, erecting, or extending.]

1. Regular; orderly; due; suitable.

When all

The war shall stand ranged in its just array.

2. Exactly proportioned; proper.

Pleaseth your lordship

To meet his grace, just distance 'tween our armies?

3. Full; complete to the common standard.

He was a comely personage, a little above just stature.

4. Full; true; a sense allied to the preceding, or the same.

--So that once the skirmish was like to have come to a just battle.

5. In a moral sense, upright; honest; having principles of rectitude; or conforming exactly to the laws, and to principles of rectitude in social conduct; equitable in the distribution of justice; as a just judge.

6. In an evangelical sense, righteous; religious; influenced by a regard to the laws of God; or living in exact conformity to the divine will.

There is not a just man on earth, that doeth good, and sinneth not. Ecclesiastes 7:15.

7. Conformed to rules of justice; doing equal justice.

JUST balances, just weights, a just ephah and a just him shall ye have. Leviticus 19:36.

8. Conformed to truth; exact; proper; accurate; as just thoughts; just expressions; just images or representations; a just description; a just inference.

9. True; founded in truth and fact; as a just charge or accusation.

10. Innocent; blameless; without guilt.

How should man be just with God? Job 9:2.

11. Equitable; due; merited; as a just recompense or reward.

--Whose damnation is just Romans 3:8.

12. True to promises; faithful; as just to one's word or engagements.

13. Impartial; allowing what is due; giving fair representation of character, merit or demerit.

JUST', adverb Close or closely; ; near or nearly, in place. He stood just by the speaker, and heard what he said. He stood just at the entrance of the city.

1. Near or nearly in time; almost. just at that moment he arose and fled.

2. Exactly; nicely; accurately. They remain just of the same opinion.

'Tis with our judgments as our watches; Go just alike, yet each believes his own.

3. Merely; barely; exactly.

--And having just enough, not covet more.

4. Narrowly. He just escaped without injury.

JUST, noun A mock encounter on horseback; a combat for sport or for exercise, in which the combatants pushed with lances and swords, man to man, in mock fight; a tilt; one of the exercises at tournaments.

JUST, verb intransitive

1. To engage in mock fight on horseback.

2. To push; to drive; to justle.

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The use of accurate definitions, based upon biblical context, is paramount in teaching the application of God's word to our daily lives.

— Todd (Colorado Springs, CO)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

fumatory

FU'MATORY, n. [L. fumaria herba.]

A plant or genus of plants, called Fumaria, of several species.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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