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Tuesday - December 11, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [joint]

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joint

JOINT, n. [L. junctura. See Join.]

1. The joining of two or more things.

2. In anatomy, the joining of two or more bones; an articulation; as the elbow, the knee, or the knuckle.

3. A knot; the union of two parts of a plant; or the space between two joints; an internode; as the joint of a cane, or of a stalk of maiz.

4. A hinge; a juncture of parts which admits of motion.

5. The place where two pieces of timber are united.

6. In joinery, straight lines are called a joint, when two pieces of wood are planed.

7. One of the limbs of an animal cut up by the butcher.

Out of joint, luxated; dislocated; as when the head of a bone is displaced from its socket. Hence figuratively, confused; disordered; misplaced.

JOINT, a. Shared by two or more; as joint property.

1. United in the same profession; having an interest in the same thing; as a joint-heir or heiress.

2. United; combined; acting in concert; as a joint force; joint efforts; joint vigor.

Joint stock, the capital or fund of a company or partnership in business.

JOINT, v.t. To form with joints or articulations; used mostly in the participle; as the fingers are jointed; a cane has a jointed stalk.

1. To form many parts into one; as jointed wood.

2. To cut or divide into joints or quarters.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [joint]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

JOINT, n. [L. junctura. See Join.]

1. The joining of two or more things.

2. In anatomy, the joining of two or more bones; an articulation; as the elbow, the knee, or the knuckle.

3. A knot; the union of two parts of a plant; or the space between two joints; an internode; as the joint of a cane, or of a stalk of maiz.

4. A hinge; a juncture of parts which admits of motion.

5. The place where two pieces of timber are united.

6. In joinery, straight lines are called a joint, when two pieces of wood are planed.

7. One of the limbs of an animal cut up by the butcher.

Out of joint, luxated; dislocated; as when the head of a bone is displaced from its socket. Hence figuratively, confused; disordered; misplaced.

JOINT, a. Shared by two or more; as joint property.

1. United in the same profession; having an interest in the same thing; as a joint-heir or heiress.

2. United; combined; acting in concert; as a joint force; joint efforts; joint vigor.

Joint stock, the capital or fund of a company or partnership in business.

JOINT, v.t. To form with joints or articulations; used mostly in the participle; as the fingers are jointed; a cane has a jointed stalk.

1. To form many parts into one; as jointed wood.

2. To cut or divide into joints or quarters.

JOINT, v.t.

  1. To form with joints or articulations; used mostly in the participle; as, the fingers are jointed; a cane has a jointed stalk.
  2. To form many parts into one; as, jointed wood. – Dryden.
  3. To cut or divide into joints or quarters. – Dryden.

JOINT, a.

  1. Shared by two or more; as, joint property.
  2. United in the same profession; having an interest in the in same thing; as, a joint-heir or heiress.
  3. United; combined; acting in concert; as, a joint force; joint efforts; joint vigor.

JOINT, n. [Fr. joint; Sp. junta, juntura; It. giuntura; L. junctura. See Join.]

  1. The joining of two or more things.
  2. In anatomy, the joining of two or more bones; an articulation; as the elbow, the knee, or the knuckle.
  3. A knot; the union of two parts of a plant; or the space between two joints; an internode; as, the joint of a cane, or of a stalk of maiz.
  4. A hinge; a juncture of parts which admits of motion.
  5. The place where two pieces of timber are united.
  6. In joinery, straight lines are called a joint, when two pieces of wood are planed. – Moxon.
  7. One of the limbs of an animal cut up by the butcher. Out of joint, luxated; dislocated; as when the head of a bone is displaced from its socket. Hence figuratively, confused; disordered; misplaced.

Joint
  1. The place or part where two things or parts are joined or united; the union of two or more smooth or even surfaces admitting of a close-fitting or junction; junction; as, a joint between two pieces of timber; a joint in a pipe.
  2. Joined; united; combined; concerted; as, joint action.
  3. To unite by a joint or joints] to fit together; to prepare so as to fit together; as, to joint boards.

    Pierced through the yielding planks of jointed wood. Pope.

  4. To fit as if by joints; to coalesce as joints do; as, the stones joint, neatly.
  5. A projecting or retreating part in something; any irregularity of line or surface, as in a wall.

    [Now Chiefly U. S.]
  6. A joining of two things or parts so as to admit of motion; an articulation, whether movable or not; a hinge; as, the knee joint; a node or joint of a stem; a ball and socket joint. See Articulation.

    A scaly gauntlet now, with joints of steel,
    Must glove this hand.
    Shak.

    To tear thee joint by joint. Milton.

  7. Involving the united activity of two or more; done or produced by two or more working together.

    I read this joint effusion twice over. T. Hook.

  8. To join; to connect; to unite; to combine.

    Jointing their force 'gainst Cæsar. Shak.

  9. A narrow piece of scenery used to join together two flats or wings of an interior setting.
  10. The part or space included between two joints, knots, nodes, or articulations; as, a joint of cane or of a grass stem; a joint of the leg.
  11. United, joined, or sharing with another or with others; not solitary in interest or action; holding in common with an associate, or with associates; acting together; as, joint heir; joint creditor; joint debtor, etc.

    "Joint tenants of the world." Donne.
  12. To provide with a joint or joints; to articulate.

    The fingers are jointed together for motion. Ray.

  13. A place of low resort, as for smoking opium.

    [Slang]
  14. Any one of the large pieces of meat, as cut into portions by the butcher for roasting.
  15. Shared by, or affecting two or more; held in common; as, joint property; a joint bond.

    A joint burden laid upon us all. Shak.

    Joint committee (Parliamentary Practice), a committee composed of members of the two houses of a legislative body, for the appointment of which concurrent resolutions of the two houses are necessary. Cushing. -- Joint meeting, or Joint session, the meeting or session of two distinct bodies as one; as, a joint meeting of committees representing different corporations; a joint session of both branches of a State legislature to chose a United States senator. "Such joint meeting shall not be dissolved until the electoral votes are all counted and the result declared." Joint Rules of Congress, U. S. -- Joint resolution (Parliamentary Practice), a resolution adopted concurrently by the two branches of a legislative body. "By the constitution of the United States and the rules of the two houses, no absolute distinction is made between bills and joint resolutions." Barclay (Digest). -- Joint rule (Parliamentary Practice), a rule of proceeding adopted by the concurrent action of both branches of a legislative assembly. "Resolved, by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), that the sixteenth and seventeenth joint rules be suspended for the remainder of the session." Journal H. of R., U. S. -- Joint and several (Law), a phrase signifying that the debt, credit, obligation, etc., to which it is applied is held in such a way that the parties in interest are engaged both together and individually thus a joint and several debt is one for which all the debtors may be sued together or either of them individually. -- Joint stock, stock held in company. -- Joint- stock company (Law), a species of partnership, consisting generally of a large number of members, having a capital divided, or agreed to be divided, into shares, the shares owned by any member being usually transferable without the consent of the rest. -- Joint tenancy (Law), a tenure by two or more persons of estate by unity of interest, title, time, and possession, under which the survivor takes the whole. Blackstone. -- Joint tenant (Law), one who holds an estate by joint tenancy.

  16. To separate the joints; of; to divide at the joint or joints; to disjoint; to cut up into joints, as meat.

    "He joints the neck." Dryden.

    Quartering, jointing, seething, and roasting. Holland.

  17. A plane of fracture, or divisional plane, of a rock transverse to the stratification.
  18. The space between the adjacent surfaces of two bodies joined and held together, as by means of cement, mortar, etc.; as, a thin joint.
  19. The means whereby the meeting surfaces of pieces in a structure are secured together.

    Coursing joint (Masonry), the mortar joint between two courses of bricks or stones. -- Fish joint, Miter joint, Universal joint, etc. See under Fish, Miter, etc. -- Joint bolt, a bolt for fastening two pieces, as of wood, one endwise to the other, having a nut embedded in one of the pieces. -- Joint chair (Railroad), the chair that supports the ends of abutting rails. -- Joint coupling, a universal joint for coupling shafting. See under Universal. -- Joint hinge, a hinge having long leaves; a strap hinge. -- Joint splice, a reënforce at a joint, to sustain the parts in their true relation. -- Joint stool. (a) A stool consisting of jointed parts; a folding stool. Shak. (b) A block for supporting the end of a piece at a joint; a joint chair. -- Out of joint, out of place; dislocated, as when the head of a bone slips from its socket; hence, not working well together; disordered. "The time is out of joint." Shak.

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Joint

JOINT, noun [Latin junctura. See Join.]

1. The joining of two or more things.

2. In anatomy, the joining of two or more bones; an articulation; as the elbow, the knee, or the knuckle.

3. A knot; the union of two parts of a plant; or the space between two joints; an internode; as the joint of a cane, or of a stalk of maiz.

4. A hinge; a juncture of parts which admits of motion.

5. The place where two pieces of timber are united.

6. In joinery, straight lines are called a joint when two pieces of wood are planed.

7. One of the limbs of an animal cut up by the butcher.

Out of joint luxated; dislocated; as when the head of a bone is displaced from its socket. Hence figuratively, confused; disordered; misplaced.

JOINT, adjective Shared by two or more; as joint property.

1. United in the same profession; having an interest in the same thing; as a joint-heir or heiress.

2. United; combined; acting in concert; as a joint force; joint efforts; joint vigor.

JOINT stock, the capital or fund of a company or partnership in business.

JOINT, verb transitive To form with joints or articulations; used mostly in the participle; as the fingers are jointed; a cane has a jointed stalk.

1. To form many parts into one; as jointed wood.

2. To cut or divide into joints or quarters.

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The 1828 webster's definitions are clearer than its "successors". It has no political correctness and it's a dictionary I read now (after I knew about it) hand-in-hand with my Bible. Thank you for providing such a valuable resource online. -Kevin

— Kevin (Cebu, Ceb)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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MUS'TER-ROLL, n. A roll or register of the troops in each company, troop or regiment.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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