HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Thursday - December 13, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [join]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

join

JOIN, v.t. [L. jungo, jungere; jungo for jugo, jugum; Eng. yoke;

Gr. a yoke, and a pair, to join.]

1. To set or bring one thing in contiguity with another.

Woe to them that join house to house, that lay field to field. Is.5.

2. To couple; to connect; to combine; as, to join ideas.

3. To unite in league or marriage.

Now Jehoshaphat had riches and honor in abundance, and joined affinity with Ahab. 2 Ch.18.

What God hath joined together, let not man put asunder. Matt.19.

4. To associate.

Go near and join thyself to this chariot. Acts.8.

5. To unite in any act.

Thy tuneful voice with numbers join.

6. To unite in concord.

But that ye be perfectly joined together in the same mind, and in the same judgment. 1 Cor.1.

The phrase, to join battle, is probably elliptical, for join in battle; or it is borrowed from the Latin, committere proelium, to send together the battle.

In general, join signifies to unite two entire things without breach or intermixture, by contact or contiguity, either temporary or permanent. It differs from connect, which signifies properly, to unite by an intermediate substance. But join, unite, and connect are often used synonymously.

JOIN, v.i. To grow to; to adhere. The place where two bones of the body join, is called a joint or articulation.

1. To be contiguous, close or in contact; as when two houses join.

2. To unite with in marriage, league, confederacy, partnership or society. Russia and Austria joined in opposition to Buonaparte's ambitious views. Men join in great undertakings, and in companies for trade or manufacture. They join in entertainments and amusements. They join in benevolent associations. It is often followed by with.

Any other may join with him that is injured, and assist him in recovering satisfaction.

Should we again break thy commandments, and join in affinity with the people of these abominations? Ezra 9.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [join]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

JOIN, v.t. [L. jungo, jungere; jungo for jugo, jugum; Eng. yoke;

Gr. a yoke, and a pair, to join.]

1. To set or bring one thing in contiguity with another.

Woe to them that join house to house, that lay field to field. Is.5.

2. To couple; to connect; to combine; as, to join ideas.

3. To unite in league or marriage.

Now Jehoshaphat had riches and honor in abundance, and joined affinity with Ahab. 2 Ch.18.

What God hath joined together, let not man put asunder. Matt.19.

4. To associate.

Go near and join thyself to this chariot. Acts.8.

5. To unite in any act.

Thy tuneful voice with numbers join.

6. To unite in concord.

But that ye be perfectly joined together in the same mind, and in the same judgment. 1 Cor.1.

The phrase, to join battle, is probably elliptical, for join in battle; or it is borrowed from the Latin, committere proelium, to send together the battle.

In general, join signifies to unite two entire things without breach or intermixture, by contact or contiguity, either temporary or permanent. It differs from connect, which signifies properly, to unite by an intermediate substance. But join, unite, and connect are often used synonymously.

JOIN, v.i. To grow to; to adhere. The place where two bones of the body join, is called a joint or articulation.

1. To be contiguous, close or in contact; as when two houses join.

2. To unite with in marriage, league, confederacy, partnership or society. Russia and Austria joined in opposition to Buonaparte's ambitious views. Men join in great undertakings, and in companies for trade or manufacture. They join in entertainments and amusements. They join in benevolent associations. It is often followed by with.

Any other may join with him that is injured, and assist him in recovering satisfaction.

Should we again break thy commandments, and join in affinity with the people of these abominations? Ezra 9.

JOIN, v.i.

  1. To grow to; to adhere. The place where two bones of the body join, is called a joint or articulation.
  2. To be contiguous, close or in contact; as, when two houses join.
  3. To unite with in marriage, league, confederacy, partnership or society. Russia and Austria joined in opposition to Buonaparte's ambitious views. Men join in great undertakings, and in companies for trade or manufacture. They join in entertainments and amusements, They join in benevolent associations. Is often followed by with. Any other may join with him that is injured, and assist him in recovering satisfaction. – Locke. Should we again break thy commandments, and join in affinity with the people of these abominations? – Ezra ix.

JOIN, v.t. [Fr. joindre; It. giugnere; from L. jungo, jungere; jungo for jugo; Sp. and Port. juntar, to join; L. jugum; Eng. yoke; Gr. ζυγος and ζευγος, a yoke, and a pair; ζυγοω, to yoke; ζευγνυμι, to join; Ch. זוג; Syr. ܐܘܓ zug; Ar. زَاجَ zauga, to join, to couple, to marry, to pair; Eth. ዘወገ zog, a pair, as in Arabic. It signifies also in Syriac, to rage, to cry out; showing that the primary sense is to strain, to stretch, to extend, precisely as in span.]

  1. To set or bring one thing in contiguity with another. Woe to them that join house to house, that lay field to field. – Is. v.
  2. To couple; to connect; to combine; as, to join ideas. – Locke.
  3. To unite in league or marriage. Now Jehoshaphat had riches and honor in abundance, and joined affinity with Ahab. – 2 Ch. xviii. What God hath joined together, let not man put asunder. – Matth. xix.
  4. To associate. Go near and join thyself to this chariot. – Acts viii.
  5. To unite in any act. Thy tuneful voice with numbers join. – Dryden.
  6. To unite in concord. But that ye be perfectly joined together in the same mind, and in the same judgment. – 1 Cor. i. The phrase, to join battle, is probably elliptical, for join in battle or it is borrowed from the Latin, committere praelium, to send together the battle. In general, join signifies to unite two entire things without a breach or intermixture, by contact or contiguity, either temporary or permanent. It differs from connect, which signifies properly, to unite by an intermediate substance. But join, unite, and connect are often used synonymously.

Join
  1. To bring together, literally or figuratively; to place in contact; to connect; to couple; to unite; to combine; to associate; to add; to append.

    Woe unto them that join house to house. Is. v. 8.

    Held up his left hand, which did flame and burn
    Like twenty torches joined.
    Shak.

    Thy tuneful voice with numbers join. Dryden.

  2. To be contiguous, close, or in contact; to come together; to unite; to mingle; to form a union; as, the bones of the skull join; two rivers join.

    Whose house joined hard to the synagogue. Acts xviii. 7.

    Should we again break thy commandments, and join in affinity with the people of these abominations? Ezra ix. 14.

    Nature and fortune joined to make thee great. Shak.

  3. The line joining two points; the point common to two intersecting lines.

    Henrici.
  4. To associate one's self to; to be or become connected with; to league one's self with; to unite with; as, to join a party; to join the church.

    We jointly now to join no other head. Dryden.

  5. To unite in marriage.

    He that joineth his virgin in matrimony. Wyclif.

    What, therefore, God hath joined together, let not man put asunder. Matt. xix. 6.

  6. To enjoin upon; to command.

    [Obs. *** R.]

    They join them penance, as they call it. Tyndale.

  7. To accept, or engage in, as a contest] as, to join encounter, battle, issue.

    Milton.

    To join battle, To join issue. See under Battle, Issue.

    Syn. -- To add; annex; unite; connect; combine; consociate; couple; link; append. See Add.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

73

573

64

620

87

609
Join

JOIN, verb transitive [Latin jungo, jungere; jungo for jugo, jugum; Eng. yoke;

Gr. a yoke, and a pair, to join ]

1. To set or bring one thing in contiguity with another.

Woe to them that join house to house, that lay field to field. Isaiah 5:8.

2. To couple; to connect; to combine; as, to join ideas.

3. To unite in league or marriage.

Now Jehoshaphat had riches and honor in abundance, and joined affinity with Ahab. 2 Chronicles 18:1.

What God hath joined together, let not man put asunder. Matthew 19:6.

4. To associate.

Go near and join thyself to this chariot. Acts 8:29.

5. To unite in any act.

Thy tuneful voice with numbers join

6. To unite in concord.

But that ye be perfectly joined together in the same mind, and in the same judgment. 1 Corinthians 1:10.

The phrase, to join battle, is probably elliptical, for join in battle; or it is borrowed from the Latin, committere proelium, to send together the battle.

In general, join signifies to unite two entire things without breach or intermixture, by contact or contiguity, either temporary or permanent. It differs from connect, which signifies properly, to unite by an intermediate substance. But join unite, and connect are often used synonymously.

JOIN, verb intransitive To grow to; to adhere. The place where two bones of the body join is called a joint or articulation.

1. To be contiguous, close or in contact; as when two houses join

2. To unite with in marriage, league, confederacy, partnership or society. Russia and Austria joined in opposition to Buonaparte's ambitious views. Men join in great undertakings, and in companies for trade or manufacture. They join in entertainments and amusements. They join in benevolent associations. It is often followed by with.

Any other may join with him that is injured, and assist him in recovering satisfaction.

Should we again break thy commandments, and join in affinity with the people of these abominations? Ezra 9:14.

Why 1828?

0
2
 


As a Christian, the original meaning and origin of the words is of utmost importance to me. Other than a Concordance, this is the closest.

— Adee (Harker Heights, TX)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

fletz

FLETZ, a. In geology, the fletz formations, so called, consist of rocks which lie immediately over the transition rocks. These formations are so called because the rocks usually appear in beds more nearly horizontal than the transition class. These formations consist of sandstone, limestone, gypsum, calamine, chalk, coal and trap. They contain abundance of petrifactions, both of animal and vegetable origin.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

155

305

Compact Edition

124

105

CD-ROM

102

81

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.356 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top