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Thursday - December 13, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [jade]

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jade

JADE, n.

1. A mean or poor horse; a tired horse; a worthless nag.

Tired as a jade in overloaden cart.

2. A mean woman; a word of contempt, noting sometimes age, but generally vice.

She shines the first of battered jades.

3. A young woman; in irony or slight contempt.

JADE, n. A mineral called also nephrite or nephritic stone,remarkable for its hardness and tenacity, of a color more or less green, and of a resinous or oily aspect when polished. It is fusible into a glass or enamel. Cleveland divides jade into three subspecies, nephrite, saussurite, and axestone. It is found in detached masses or inhering in rocks.

JADE, v.t. To tire; to fatigue; to weary with hard service; as, to jade a horse.

1. To weary with attention or study; to tire.

The mind once jaded by an attempt above its power, is very hardly brought to exert its force again.

2. To harass; to crush.

3. To tire or wear out in mean offices; as a jaded groom.

4. To ride; to rule with tyranny.

I do not now fool myself, to let imagination jade me.

JADE, v.i. To become weary; to lose spirit; to sink.

They are promising in the beginning,but they fail and jade and tire in the prosecution.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [jade]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

JADE, n.

1. A mean or poor horse; a tired horse; a worthless nag.

Tired as a jade in overloaden cart.

2. A mean woman; a word of contempt, noting sometimes age, but generally vice.

She shines the first of battered jades.

3. A young woman; in irony or slight contempt.

JADE, n. A mineral called also nephrite or nephritic stone,remarkable for its hardness and tenacity, of a color more or less green, and of a resinous or oily aspect when polished. It is fusible into a glass or enamel. Cleveland divides jade into three subspecies, nephrite, saussurite, and axestone. It is found in detached masses or inhering in rocks.

JADE, v.t. To tire; to fatigue; to weary with hard service; as, to jade a horse.

1. To weary with attention or study; to tire.

The mind once jaded by an attempt above its power, is very hardly brought to exert its force again.

2. To harass; to crush.

3. To tire or wear out in mean offices; as a jaded groom.

4. To ride; to rule with tyranny.

I do not now fool myself, to let imagination jade me.

JADE, v.i. To become weary; to lose spirit; to sink.

They are promising in the beginning,but they fail and jade and tire in the prosecution.

JADE, n.1 [of unknown origin. Qu. Sp. jadear, to pant.]

  1. A mean or poor horse; a tired horse; a worthless nag. Tired as a jade in overloaden cart. – Sidney.
  2. A mean woman; a word of contempt, noting sometimes age, but generally vice. – Johnson. She shines the first of battered jades. – Swift.
  3. A young woman; in irony or slight contempt. – Addison.

JADE, n.2

A mineral called also nephrite or nephritic stone, remarkable for its hardness and tenacity, of a color more or less green, and of a resinous or oily aspect when polished. It is fusible into a glass or enamel. Cleaveland divides jade into three subspecies, nephrite, saussurite, and axestone. It is found in detached masses or inhering in rocks. – Werner. Jameson. Cleaveland.


JADE, v.i.

To become weary; to lose spirit; to sink. They are promising in the beginning, but they fail and jade and tire in the prosecution. – South.


JADE, v.t.

  1. To tire; to fatigue; to weary with hard service; as, to jade a horse.
  2. To weary with attention or study; to tire. The mind once jaded by an attempt above its power, is very hardly brought to exert its force again. Locke.
  3. To harass; to crush. – Shak.
  4. To tire or wear out in mean offices; as, a jaded groom. – Shak.
  5. To ride; to rule with tyranny. I do not now fool myself, to let imagination jade me. – Shak.

Jade
  1. A stone, commonly of a pale to dark green color but sometimes whitish. It is very hard and compact, capable of fine polish, and is used for ornamental purposes and for implements, esp. in Eastern countries and among many early peoples.

    * The general term jade includes nephrite, a compact variety of tremolite with a specific gravity of 3, and also the mineral jadeite, a silicate of alumina and soda, with a specific gravity of 3.3. The latter is the more highly prized and includes the feitsui of the Chinese. The name has also been given to other tough green minerals capable of similar use.

  2. A mean or tired horse; a worthless nag.

    Chaucer.

    Tired as a jade in overloaden cart. Sir P. Sidney.

  3. To treat like a jade] to spurn.

    [Obs.] Shak.
  4. To become weary; to lose spirit.

    They . . . fail, and jade, and tire in the prosecution. South.

  5. A disreputable or vicious woman; a wench; a quean; also, sometimes, a worthless man.

    Shak.

    She shines the first of battered jades. Swift.

  6. To make ridiculous and contemptible.

    [Obs.]

    I do now fool myself, to let imagination jade me. Shak.

  7. A young woman; -- generally so called in irony or slight contempt.

    A souple jade she was, and strang. Burns.

  8. To exhaust by overdriving or long- continued labor of any kind; to tire or wear out by severe or tedious tasks; to harass.

    The mind, once jaded by an attempt above its power, . . . checks at any vigorous undertaking ever after. Locke.

    Syn. -- To fatigue; tire; weary; harass. -- To Jade, Fatigue, Tire, Weary. Fatigue is the generic term; tire denotes fatigue which wastes the strength; weary implies that a person is worn out by exertion; jade refers to the weariness created by a long and steady repetition of the same act or effort. A little exertion will tire a child or a weak person; a severe or protracted task wearies equally the body and the mind; the most powerful horse becomes jaded on a long journey by a continual straining of the same muscles. Wearied with labor of body or mind; tired of work, tired out by importunities; jaded by incessant attention to business.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Jade

JADE, noun

1. A mean or poor horse; a tired horse; a worthless nag.

Tired as a jade in overloaden cart.

2. A mean woman; a word of contempt, noting sometimes age, but generally vice.

She shines the first of battered jades.

3. A young woman; in irony or slight contempt.

JADE, noun A mineral called also nephrite or nephritic stone, remarkable for its hardness and tenacity, of a color more or less green, and of a resinous or oily aspect when polished. It is fusible into a glass or enamel. Cleveland divides jade into three subspecies, nephrite, saussurite, and axestone. It is found in detached masses or inhering in rocks.

JADE, verb transitive To tire; to fatigue; to weary with hard service; as, to jade a horse.

1. To weary with attention or study; to tire.

The mind once jaded by an attempt above its power, is very hardly brought to exert its force again.

2. To harass; to crush.

3. To tire or wear out in mean offices; as a jaded groom.

4. To ride; to rule with tyranny.

I do not now fool myself, to let imagination jade me.

JADE, verb intransitive To become weary; to lose spirit; to sink.

They are promising in the beginning, but they fail and jade and tire in the prosecution.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

bee

BEE, n. An insect of the genus Apis. [See Apis.] The species are numerous, of which the honey-bee is the most interesting to man. It has been cultivated from the earliest periods, for its wax and honey. It lives in swarms or societies, of from 10,000 to 50,000 individuals. These swarms contain three classes of bees, the females or queen bees, the males or drones, and the neuters or working bees. Of the former, there is only one in each hive or swarm, whose sole office is to propagate the species. It is much larger than the other bees. The drones serve merely for impregnating the queen, after which they are destroyed by the neuters. These last are the laborers of the hive. They collect the honey, form the cells, and feed the other bees and the young. They are furnished with a proboscis by which they suck the honey from flowers, and a mouth by which they swallow it, and then convey it to the hive in their stomachs, where they disgorge it into the cells. The pollen of flowers settles on the hairs with which their body is covered, whence it is collected into pellets, by a brush on their second pair of legs,and deposited in a hollow in the third pair. It is called bee bread, and is the food of the larvae or young. The adult bees feed on honey. The wax was supposed to be formed from pollen by a digestive process, but it is now ascertained that it is formed from the honey by a similar process. The females and neuters have a barbed sting, attached to a bag of poison, which flows into the wound inflicted by the sting. When a hive is overstocked, a new colony is sent out under the direction of a queen bee. This is called swarming.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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