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Tuesday - December 12, 2017

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [intelligence]

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intelligence

INTEL'LIGENCE, n. [L. intelligentia, from intelligo, to understand. This verb is probably composed of in, inter, or intus, within, and lego to collect. The primary sense of understand is generally to take or hold, as we say, to take one's ideas or meaning.]

1. Understanding; skill.

2. Notice; information communicated; an account of things distant or before unknown. Intelligence may be transmitted by messengers, by letters, by signals or by telegraphs.

3. Commerce of acquaintance; terms of intercourse. Good intelligence between men is harmony. So we say, there is a good understanding between persons, when they have the same views, or are free from discord.

4. A spiritual being; as a created intelligence. It is believed that the universe is peopled with innumerable superior intelligences.

INTEL'LIGENCE, v.t. To inform; to instruct. [Little used.]




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [intelligence]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

INTEL'LIGENCE, n. [L. intelligentia, from intelligo, to understand. This verb is probably composed of in, inter, or intus, within, and lego to collect. The primary sense of understand is generally to take or hold, as we say, to take one's ideas or meaning.]

1. Understanding; skill.

2. Notice; information communicated; an account of things distant or before unknown. Intelligence may be transmitted by messengers, by letters, by signals or by telegraphs.

3. Commerce of acquaintance; terms of intercourse. Good intelligence between men is harmony. So we say, there is a good understanding between persons, when they have the same views, or are free from discord.

4. A spiritual being; as a created intelligence. It is believed that the universe is peopled with innumerable superior intelligences.

INTEL'LIGENCE, v.t. To inform; to instruct. [Little used.]


IN-TEL'LI-GENCE, n. [Fr. from L. intelligentia, from intelligo, to understand. This verb is probably composed of in, inter, or intus, within, and lego, to collect. The primary sense of understand is generally to take or hold, as we say, to take one's ideas or meaning.]

  1. Understanding; skill. Spenser.
  2. Notice; information communicated; an account of things distant or before unknown. Intelligence may be transmitted by messengers, by letters, by signals or by telegraphs.
  3. Commerce of acquaintance; terms of intercourse. Good intelligence between men is harmony. So we say, there is a good understanding between persons, when they have the same views, or are free from discord.
  4. A spiritual being; as, a created intelligence. It is believed that the universe is peopled with innumerable superior intelligences.

IN-TEL'LI-GENCE, v.t.

To inform; to instruct. [Little used.]


In*tel"li*gence
  1. The act or state of knowing; the exercise of the understanding.
  2. The capacity to know or understand; readiness of comprehension; the intellect, as a gift or an endowment.

    And dimmed with darkness their intelligence. Spenser.

  3. Information communicated; news; notice; advice.

    Intelligence is given where you are hid. Shak.

  4. Acquaintance; intercourse; familiarity.

    [Obs.]

    He lived rather in a fair intelligence than any friendship with the favorites. Clarendon.

  5. Knowledge imparted or acquired, whether by study, research, or experience; general information.

    I write as he that none intelligence
    Of meters hath, ne flowers of sentence.
    Court of Love.

  6. An intelligent being or spirit; -- generally applied to pure spirits; as, a created intelligence.

    Milton.

    The great Intelligences fair
    That range above our mortal state,
    In circle round the blessed gate,
    Received and gave him welcome there.
    Tennyson.

    Intelligence office, an office where information may be obtained, particularly respecting servants to be hired.

    Syn. -- Understanding; intellect; instruction; advice; notice; notification; news; information; report.

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Intelligence

INTEL'LIGENCE, noun [Latin intelligentia, from intelligo, to understand. This verb is probably composed of in, inter, or intus, within, and lego to collect. The primary sense of understand is generally to take or hold, as we say, to take one's ideas or meaning.]

1. Understanding; skill.

2. Notice; information communicated; an account of things distant or before unknown. intelligence may be transmitted by messengers, by letters, by signals or by telegraphs.

3. Commerce of acquaintance; terms of intercourse. Good intelligence between men is harmony. So we say, there is a good understanding between persons, when they have the same views, or are free from discord.

4. A spiritual being; as a created intelligence It is believed that the universe is peopled with innumerable superior intelligences.

INTEL'LIGENCE, verb transitive To inform; to instruct. [Little used.]

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Biblical definitions

— Russell (Statham, GA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

civil

CIVIL, a.

1. Relating to the community, or to the policy and government of the citizens and subjects of a state; as in the phrases, civil rights, civil government, civil privileges, civil war, civil justice. It is opposed to criminal; as a civil suit, a suit between citizens alone; whereas a criminal process is between the state and a citizen. It is distinguished from ecclesiastical, which respects the church; and from military, which respects the army and navy.

2. Relating to any man as a member of a community; as civil power, civil rights, the power or rights which a man enjoys as a citizen.

3. Reduced to order, rule and government; under a regular administration; implying some refinement of manners; not savage or wild; as civil life; civil society.

4. Civilized; courteous; complaisant; gentle and obliging; well-bred; affable; kind; having the manners of a city, as opposed to the rough, rude, coarse manners of a savage or clown.

Where civil speech and soft persuasion hung.

5. Grave; sober; not gay or showy.

Till civil suited morn appear.

6. Compaisant; polite; a popular colloquial use of the word.

7. Civil death, in law, is that which cuts off a man from civil society, or its rights and benefits, as banishment, outlawry, excommunication, entering into a monastery, &c., as distinguished from natural death.

8. Civil law, in a general sense, the law of a state, city or country; but in an appropriate sense, the Roman empire, comprised in the Institutes, Code and Digest of Justinian and the Novel Constitutions.

9. Civil list, the officers of civil government, who are paid from the public treasury; also, the revenue appropriated to support the civil government.

The army of James II was paid out of his civil list.

10. Civil state, the whole body of the laity or citizens, not included under the military, maritime, and ecclesiastical states.

11. Civil war, a war between people of the same state or city; opposed to foreign war.

12. Civil year, the legal year, or annual account of time which a government appoints to be used in its own dominions, as distinguished from the natural year, which is measured by the revolution of the heavenly bodies.

13. Civil architecture, the architecture which is employed in constructing buildings for the purposes of civil life, in distinction from military and naval architecture; as private houses, palaces, churches, &c.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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monte

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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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