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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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imitation

IMITA'TION, n. [L. imitatio; imitor, to imitate.]

1. The act of following in manner, or of copying in form; the act of making the similitude of any thing, or of attempting a resemblance. By the imitation of bad men or of evil examples, we are apt to contract vicious habits. In the imitation of natural forms and colors,we are often unsuccessful. Imitation in music, says Rousseau, is a reiteration of the same air, or of one which is similar, in several parts where it is repeated by one after the other, either in unison, or at the distance of a fourth, a fifth, a third, or any interval whatever. Imitation in oratory, is an endeavor to resemble a speaker or writer in the qualities which we propose to ourselves as patterns.

2. That which is made or produced as a copy; likeness; resemblance. We say, a thing is a true imitation of nature.

3. A method of translating, in which modern examples and illustrations are used for ancient, or domestic for foreign, or in which the translator not only varies the words and sense,but forsakes them as he sees occasion.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [imitation]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

IMITA'TION, n. [L. imitatio; imitor, to imitate.]

1. The act of following in manner, or of copying in form; the act of making the similitude of any thing, or of attempting a resemblance. By the imitation of bad men or of evil examples, we are apt to contract vicious habits. In the imitation of natural forms and colors,we are often unsuccessful. Imitation in music, says Rousseau, is a reiteration of the same air, or of one which is similar, in several parts where it is repeated by one after the other, either in unison, or at the distance of a fourth, a fifth, a third, or any interval whatever. Imitation in oratory, is an endeavor to resemble a speaker or writer in the qualities which we propose to ourselves as patterns.

2. That which is made or produced as a copy; likeness; resemblance. We say, a thing is a true imitation of nature.

3. A method of translating, in which modern examples and illustrations are used for ancient, or domestic for foreign, or in which the translator not only varies the words and sense,but forsakes them as he sees occasion.

IM-I-TA'TION, n. [Fr. from L. imitatio; imitor, to imitate.]

  1. The act of following in manner, or of copying in form; the act of making the similitude of any thing, or of attempting a resemblance. By the imitation of bad men or of evil examples, we are apt to contract vicious habits. In the imitation of natural forms and colors, we are often unsuccessful. Imitation in music, says Rousseau, is a reiteration of the same air, or of one which is similar, in several parts where it is repeated by one after the other, either in unison, or at the distance of a fourth, a fifth, a third, or any interval whatever. Imitation in oratory, is an endeavor to resemble a speaker or writer in the qualities which we propose to ourselves as patterns. Encyc.
  2. That which is made or produced as a copy; likeness; resemblance. We say, a thing is a true imitation of nature.
  3. A method of translating, in which modern examples and illustrations are used for ancient, or domestic for foreign, or in which the translator not only varies the words and sense, but forsakes them as he sees occasion. Johnson. Dryden.

Im"i*ta"tion
  1. The act of imitating.

    Poesy is an art of imitation, . . . that is to say, a representing, counterfeiting, or figuring forth. Sir P. Sidney.

  2. That which is made or produced as a copy; that which is made to resemble something else, whether for laudable or for fraudulent purposes; likeness; resemblance.

    Both these arts are not only true imitations of nature, but of the best nature. Dryden.

  3. One of the principal means of securing unity and consistency in polyphonic composition; the repetition of essentially the same melodic theme, phrase, or motive, on different degrees of pitch, by one or more of the other parts of voises. Cf. Canon.
  4. The act of condition of imitating another species of animal, or a plant, or unanimate object. See Imitate, v. t., 3.

    * Imitation is often used adjectively to characterize things which have a deceptive appearance, simulating the qualities of a superior article; -- opposed to real or genuine; as, imitation lace; imitation bronze; imitation modesty, etc.

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Imitation

IMITA'TION, noun [Latin imitatio; imitor, to imitate.]

1. The act of following in manner, or of copying in form; the act of making the similitude of any thing, or of attempting a resemblance. By the imitation of bad men or of evil examples, we are apt to contract vicious habits. In the imitation of natural forms and colors, we are often unsuccessful. imitation in music, says Rousseau, is a reiteration of the same air, or of one which is similar, in several parts where it is repeated by one after the other, either in unison, or at the distance of a fourth, a fifth, a third, or any interval whatever. imitation in oratory, is an endeavor to resemble a speaker or writer in the qualities which we propose to ourselves as patterns.

2. That which is made or produced as a copy; likeness; resemblance. We say, a thing is a true imitation of nature.

3. A method of translating, in which modern examples and illustrations are used for ancient, or domestic for foreign, or in which the translator not only varies the words and sense, but forsakes them as he sees occasion.

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thoughts from purer minds at time of greater purity than the minds of our people are beleagued with today G. Michael Stinson

— Mike (Kingfisher, OK)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

let

LET, v.t. pret. and pp. let. Letted is obsolete. [To let out, like L. elocare, is to lease.]

1. To permit; to allow; to suffer; to give leave or power by a positive act, or negatively, to withhold restraint; not to prevent. A leaky ship lets water enter into the hold. Let is followed by the infinitive without the sign to.

Pharaoh said, I will let you go. Ex. 8.

When the ship was caught and could not bear up into the wind, we let her drive. Acts 27.

2. To lease; to grant possession and use for a compensation; as, to let to farm; to let an estate for a year; to let a room to lodgers; often followed by out, as, to let out a farm; but the use of out is unnecessary.

3. To suffer; to permit; with the usual sign of the infinitive.

There's a letter for you, Sir, if your name be Horatio, as I am let to know it is. [Not used.]

4. In the imperative mode, let has the following uses. Followed by the first and third persons, it expresses desire or wish; hence it is used in prayer and entreaty to superiors, and to those who have us in their power; as, let me not wander from thy commandments. Ps. 119.

Followed by the first person plural, let expresses exhortation or entreaty; as, rise, let us go.

Followed by the third person, it implies permission or command addressed to an inferior. Let him go, let them remain, are commands addressed to the second person. Let thou, or let ye, that is, do thou or you permit him to go.

Sometimes let is used to express a command or injunction to a third person. When the signal is given to engage, let every man do his duty.

When applied to things not rational, it implies allowance or concession.

O'er golden sands let rich Pactolus flow.

5. To retard; to hinder; to impede; to interpose obstructions. 2Thess. 2.

[This sense is now obsolete, or nearly so.]

To let alone, to leave; to suffer to remain without intermeddling; as, let alone this idle project; let me alone.

To let down, to permit to sink or fall; to lower.

She let them down by a cord through the window. Josh. 2.

To let loose, to free from restraint; to permit to wander at large.

To let in or into, to permit or suffer to enter; to admit. Open the door, let in my friend. We are not let into the secrets of the cabinet.

To let blood, to open a vein and suffer the blood to flow out.

To let out, to suffer to escape; also, to lease or let to hire.

To let off, to discharge, to let fly, as an arrow; or cause to explode, as a gun.

LET, v.i. To forbear. Obs.

LET, n. A retarding; hinderance; obstacle; impediment; delay. [Obsolete, unless in some technical phrases.]

LET, a termination of diminutives; as hamlet, a little house; rivulet, a small stream. [See Little.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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