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Tuesday - January 22, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [idea]

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idea

IDE'A, n. [L. idea; Gr. to see, L. video.]

1. Literally, that which is seen; hence, form, image, model of any thing in the mind; that which is held or comprehended by the understanding or intellectual faculties.

I have used the idea, to express whatever is meant by phantasm, notion, species, or whatever it is which the mind can be employed about in thinking.

Whatever the mind perceives in itself, or is the immediate object of perception, thought or understanding, that I call an idea.

The attention of the understanding to the objects acting on it, by which it becomes sensible of the impressions they make, is called by logicians, perception, and the notices themselves as they exist in the mind, as the materials of thinking and knowledge, are distinguished by the name of ideas.

An idea is the reflex perception of objects, after the original perception or impression has been felt by the mind.

In popular language, idea signifies the same thing as conception, apprehension, notion. To have an idea of any thing is to conceive it. In philosophical use, it does not signify that act of the mind which we call thought or conception, but some object of thought.

According to modern writers on mental philosophy, an idea is the object of thought, or the notice which the mind takes of its perceptions.

Darwin uses idea for a notion of external things which our organs bring us acquainted with originally, and he defines it, a contraction, motion or configuration of the fibers which constitute the immediate organ of sense; synonymous with which he sometimes uses sensual motion, in contradistinction to muscular motion.

1. In popular use, idea signifies notion, conception, thought, opinion, and even purpose or intention.

2. Image in the mind.

Her sweet idea wandered through his thoughts.

[A bad use of the word.]

3. An opinion; a proposition. These decisions are incompatible with the idea, that the principles are derived from the civil law.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [idea]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

IDE'A, n. [L. idea; Gr. to see, L. video.]

1. Literally, that which is seen; hence, form, image, model of any thing in the mind; that which is held or comprehended by the understanding or intellectual faculties.

I have used the idea, to express whatever is meant by phantasm, notion, species, or whatever it is which the mind can be employed about in thinking.

Whatever the mind perceives in itself, or is the immediate object of perception, thought or understanding, that I call an idea.

The attention of the understanding to the objects acting on it, by which it becomes sensible of the impressions they make, is called by logicians, perception, and the notices themselves as they exist in the mind, as the materials of thinking and knowledge, are distinguished by the name of ideas.

An idea is the reflex perception of objects, after the original perception or impression has been felt by the mind.

In popular language, idea signifies the same thing as conception, apprehension, notion. To have an idea of any thing is to conceive it. In philosophical use, it does not signify that act of the mind which we call thought or conception, but some object of thought.

According to modern writers on mental philosophy, an idea is the object of thought, or the notice which the mind takes of its perceptions.

Darwin uses idea for a notion of external things which our organs bring us acquainted with originally, and he defines it, a contraction, motion or configuration of the fibers which constitute the immediate organ of sense; synonymous with which he sometimes uses sensual motion, in contradistinction to muscular motion.

1. In popular use, idea signifies notion, conception, thought, opinion, and even purpose or intention.

2. Image in the mind.

Her sweet idea wandered through his thoughts.

[A bad use of the word.]

3. An opinion; a proposition. These decisions are incompatible with the idea, that the principles are derived from the civil law.

I-DE'A, n. [L. idea; Fr. idée; Gr. ιδεα, from ειδω, to see, L. video.]

  1. Literally, that which is seen; hence, form, image, model of any thing in the mind; that which is held or comprehended by the understanding or intellectual faculties. I have used the word idea, to express whatever is meant by phantasm, notion, species, or whatever it is which the mind can be employed about in thinking. Locke. Whatever the mind perceives in itself, or is the immediate object of perception, thought or understanding, that I call an idea. Locke. The attention of the understanding to the objects acting on it, by which it becomes sensible of the impressions they make, is called by logicians, perception; and the notices themselves as they exist in the mind, as the materials of thinking and knowledge, are distinguished by the name of ideas. Encyc. art. Logic. An idea is the reflex perception of objects, after the original perception or impression has been felt by the mind. Encyc. In popular language, idea signifies the same thing as conception, apprehension, notion. To have an idea of any thing is to conceive it. In philosophical use, it does not signify that act of the mind which we call thought or conception, but some object of thought. Reid. According to modern writers on mental philosophy, an idea is the object of thought, or the notice which the mind takes of its perceptions. Darwin uses idea for a notion of external things which our organs bring us acquainted with originally, and he defines it, a contraction, motion or configuration of the fibers which constitute the immediate organ of sense; synonymous with which he sometimes uses sensual motion, in contradistinction to muscular motion.
  2. In popular use, idea signifies notion, conception, thought, opinion, and even purpose or intention. Burke.
  3. Image in the mind. Her sweet idea wandered through his thoughts. Fairfax. [A bad use of the word.]
  4. An opinion, a proposition. These decisions are incompatible with the idea, that the principles are derived from the civil law.

I*de"a
  1. The transcript, image, or picture of a visible object, that is formed by the mind; also, a similar image of any object whatever, whether sensible or spiritual.

    Her sweet idea wandered through his thoughts. Fairfax.

    Being the right idea of your father
    Both in your form and nobleness of mind.
    Shak.

    This representation or likeness of the object being transmitted from thence [the senses] to the imagination, and lodged there for the view and observation of the pure intellect, is aptly and properly called its idea. P. Browne.

  2. A general notion, or a conception formed by generalization.

    Alice had not the slightest idea what latitude was. L. Caroll.

  3. Hence: Any object apprehended, conceived, or thought of, by the mind; a notion, conception, or thought; the real object that is conceived or thought of.

    Whatsoever the mind perceives in itself, or as the immediate object of perception, thought, or undersanding, that I call idea. Locke.

  4. A belief, option, or doctrine; a characteristic or controlling principle; as, an essential idea; the idea of development.

    That fellow seems to me to possess but one idea, and that is a wrong one. Johnson.

    What is now "idea" for us? How infinite the fall of this word, since the time where Milton sang of the Creator contemplating his newly-created world, -
    "how it showed . . .
    Answering his great idea," -
    to its present use, when this person "has an idea that the train has started," and the other "had no idea that the dinner would be so bad!"
    Trench.

  5. A plan or purpose of action; intention; design.

    I shortly afterwards set off for that capital, with an idea of undertaking while there the translation of the work. W. Irving.

  6. A rational conception; the complete conception of an object when thought of in all its essential elements or constituents; the necessary metaphysical or constituent attributes and relations, when conceived in the abstract.
  7. A fiction object or picture created by the imagination; the same when proposed as a pattern to be copied, or a standard to be reached; one of the archetypes or patterns of created things, conceived by the Platonists to have excited objectively from eternity in the mind of the Deity.

    Thence to behold this new-created world,
    The addition of his empire, how it showed
    In prospect from his throne, how good, how fair,
    Answering his great idea.
    Milton.

    * "In England, Locke may be said to have been the first who naturalized the term in its Cartesian universality. When, in common language, employed by Milton and Dryden, after Descartes, as before him by Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Hooker, etc., the meaning is Platonic." Sir W. Hamilton.

    Abstract idea, Association of ideas, etc. See under Abstract, Association, etc.

    Syn. -- Notion; conception; thought; sentiment; fancy; image; perception; impression; opinion; belief; observation; judgment; consideration; view; design; intention; purpose; plan; model; pattern. There is scarcely any other word which is subjected to such abusive treatment as is the word idea, in the very general and indiscriminative way in which it is employed, as it is used variously to signify almost any act, state, or content of thought.

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Idea

IDE'A, noun [Latin idea; Gr. to see, Latin video.]

1. Literally, that which is seen; hence, form, image, model of any thing in the mind; that which is held or comprehended by the understanding or intellectual faculties.

I have used the idea to express whatever is meant by phantasm, notion, species, or whatever it is which the mind can be employed about in thinking.

Whatever the mind perceives in itself, or is the immediate object of perception, thought or understanding, that I call an idea

The attention of the understanding to the objects acting on it, by which it becomes sensible of the impressions they make, is called by logicians, perception, and the notices themselves as they exist in the mind, as the materials of thinking and knowledge, are distinguished by the name of ideas.

An idea is the reflex perception of objects, after the original perception or impression has been felt by the mind.

In popular language, idea signifies the same thing as conception, apprehension, notion. To have an idea of any thing is to conceive it. In philosophical use, it does not signify that act of the mind which we call thought or conception, but some object of thought.

According to modern writers on mental philosophy, an idea is the object of thought, or the notice which the mind takes of its perceptions.

Darwin uses idea for a notion of external things which our organs bring us acquainted with originally, and he defines it, a contraction, motion or configuration of the fibers which constitute the immediate organ of sense; synonymous with which he sometimes uses sensual motion, in contradistinction to muscular motion.

1. In popular use, idea signifies notion, conception, thought, opinion, and even purpose or intention.

2. Image in the mind.

Her sweet idea wandered through his thoughts.

[A bad use of the word.]

3. An opinion; a proposition. These decisions are incompatible with the idea that the principles are derived from the civil law.

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As a chrisitian..it's the most profound I've seen. I love it.

— Kerry (Melber, KY)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

thicksprung

THICK'SPRUNG, a. [thick and sprung.] Sprung up close together.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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