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Saturday - October 19, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [ice]

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ice

ICE, n.

1. Water or other fluid congealed, or in a solid state; a solid, transparent, brittle substance, formed by the congelation of a fluid, by means of the abstraction of the heat necessary to preserve its fluidity, or to use language, congealed by cold.

2. Concreted sugar.

To break the ice, is to make the first opening to any attempt; to remove the first obstructions or difficulties; to open the way.

ICE, v.t. To cover with ice; to convert into ice.

1. To cover with concreted sugar; to frost.

2. To chill; to freeze.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [ice]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

ICE, n.

1. Water or other fluid congealed, or in a solid state; a solid, transparent, brittle substance, formed by the congelation of a fluid, by means of the abstraction of the heat necessary to preserve its fluidity, or to use language, congealed by cold.

2. Concreted sugar.

To break the ice, is to make the first opening to any attempt; to remove the first obstructions or difficulties; to open the way.

ICE, v.t. To cover with ice; to convert into ice.

1. To cover with concreted sugar; to frost.

2. To chill; to freeze.

ICE, n. [Sax. is, isa; G. eis; D. ys; Dan. iis; Sw. and Ice. is; Ir. cuise. The true orthography would be ise. The primary sense is doubtless to set, to fix, to congeal or harden. It may be allied to the G. eisen, iron; perhaps also to L. os, a bone.]

  1. Water or other fluid congealed, or in a solid state; a solid, transparent, brittle substance, formed by the congelation of a fluid, by means of the abstraction of the heat necessary to preserve its fluidity, or to use common language, congealed by cold.
  2. Concreted sugar. To break the ice, is to make the first opening to any attempt; to remove the first obstructions or difficulties; to open the way. Shak. Ice period, a period supposed to have occurred after the tertiary formations were deposited, in which, at least, the frigid and temperate zones were covered with a coat of ice.

ICE, v.t.

  1. To cover with ice; to convert into ice. Fletcher.
  2. To cover with concreted sugar; to frost. Puller.
  3. To chill; to freeze.

Ice
  1. Water or other fluid frozen or reduced to the solid state by cold; frozen water. It is a white or transparent colorless substance, crystalline, brittle, and viscoidal. Its specific gravity (0.92, that of water at 4° C. being 1.0) being less than that of water, ice floats.

    * Water freezes at 32° F. or 0° Cent., and ice melts at the same temperature. Ice owes its cooling properties to the large amount of heat required to melt it.

  2. To cover with ice; to convert into ice, or into something resembling ice.
  3. Concreted sugar.

    Johnson.
  4. To cover with icing, or frosting made of sugar and milk or white of egg; to frost, as cakes, tarts, etc.
  5. Water, cream, custard, etc., sweetened, flavored, and artificially frozen.
  6. To chill or cool, as with ice; to freeze.
  7. Any substance having the appearance of ice; as, camphor ice.

    Anchor ice, ice which sometimes forms about stones and other objects at the bottom of running or other water, and is thus attached or anchored to the ground. -- Bay ice, ice formed in bays, fiords, etc., often in extensive fields which drift out to sea. -- Ground ice, anchor ice. -- Ice age (Geol.), the glacial epoch or period. See under Glacial. -- Ice anchor (Naut.), a grapnel for mooring a vessel to a field of ice. Kane. -- Ice blink [Dan. iisblink], a streak of whiteness of the horizon, caused by the reflection of light from ice not yet in sight. -- Ice boat. (a) A boat fitted with skates or runners, and propelled on ice by sails; an ice yacht. (b) A strong steamboat for breaking a channel through ice. -- Ice box or chest, a box for holding ice; a box in which things are kept cool by means of ice; a refrigerator. -- Ice brook, a brook or stream as cold as ice. [Poetic] Shak. -- Ice cream [for iced cream], cream, milk, or custard, sweetened, flavored, and frozen. -- Ice field, an extensive sheet of ice. -- Ice float, Ice floe, a sheet of floating ice similar to an ice field, but smaller. -- Ice foot, shore ice in Arctic regions; an ice belt. Kane. -- Ice house, a close-covered pit or building for storing ice. -- Ice machine (Physics), a machine for making ice artificially, as by the production of a low temperature through the sudden expansion of a gas or vapor, or the rapid evaporation of a volatile liquid. -- Ice master. See Ice pilot (below). -- Ice pack, an irregular mass of broken and drifting ice. -- Ice paper, a transparent film of gelatin for copying or reproducing; papier glacé. -- Ice petrel (Zoöl.), a shearwater (Puffinus gelidus) of the Antarctic seas, abundant among floating ice. -- Ice pick, a sharp instrument for breaking ice into small pieces. -- Ice pilot, a pilot who has charge of a vessel where the course is obstructed by ice, as in polar seas; -- called also ice master. -- Ice pitcher, a pitcher adapted for ice water. -- Ice plow, a large tool for grooving and cutting ice. -- Ice sludge, bay ice broken small by the wind or waves; sludge. -- Ice spar (Min.), a variety of feldspar, the crystals of which are very clear like ice; rhyacolite. -- Ice tongs, large iron nippers for handling ice. -- Ice water. (a) Water cooled by ice. (b) Water formed by the melting of ice. -- Ice yacht. See Ice boat (above). -- To break the ice. See under Break. -- Water ice, a confection consisting of water sweetened, flavored, and frozen.

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Ice

ICE, noun

1. Water or other fluid congealed, or in a solid state; a solid, transparent, brittle substance, formed by the congelation of a fluid, by means of the abstraction of the heat necessary to preserve its fluidity, or to use language, congealed by cold.

2. Concreted sugar.

To break the ice is to make the first opening to any attempt; to remove the first obstructions or difficulties; to open the way.

ICE, verb transitive To cover with ice; to convert into ice

1. To cover with concreted sugar; to frost.

2. To chill; to freeze.

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I love the depth of the words and the penetrating insight of Mr. Webster.

— Betsy (Greenville, SC)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

skip

SKIP, v.i. To leap; to bound; to spring; as a goat or lamb.

To skip over, to pass without notice; to omit.

SKIP, v.t. To pass over or by; to omit; to miss.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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