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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [grow]

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grow

GROW, v.i. pret. grew; pp. grown. [L. cresco.]

1. To enlarge in bulk or stature, by a natural, imperceptible addition of matter, through ducts and secreting organs, as animal and vegetable bodies; to vegetate as plants, or to be augmented by natural process, as animals. Thus, a plant grows from a seed to a shrub or tree, and a human being grows from a fetus to a man.

He causeth the grass to grow for cattle. Ps.104.

2. To be produced by vegetation; as, wheat grows in most parts of the world; rice grows only in warm climates.

3. To increase; to be augmented; to wax; as, a body grows larger by inflation or distension; intemperance is a growing evil.

4. To advance; to improve; to make progress; as, to grow in grace, in knowledge, in piety. The young man is growing in reputation.

5. To advance; to extend. His reputation is growing.

6. To come by degrees; to become; to reach any state; as, he grows more skillful, or more prudent. Let not vice grow to a habit, or into a habit.

7. To come forward; to advance. [Not much used.]

Winter began to grow fast on.

8. To be changed from one state to another; to become; as, to grow pale; to grow poor; to grow rich.

9. To proceed, as from a cause or reason. Lax morals may grow from errors in opinion.

10. To accrue; to come.

Why should damage grow to the hurt of the kings. Ezra.4.

11. To swell; to increase; as, the wind grew to a tempest.

To grow out of, to issue from; as plants from the soil, or as a branch from the main stem.

These wars have grown out of commercial considerations.

To grow up, to arrive at manhood, or to advance to full stature or maturity.

To grow up,

To grow together, To close and adhere; to become united by growth; as flesh or the bark of a tree severed.

Grow, signifies properly to shoot out, to enlarge; but it is often used to denote a passing from one state to another, and from greater to less.

Marriages grow less frequent.

[To grow less, is an abuse of this word; the phrase should be to become less.]

GROW, v.t. To produce; to raise; as, a farmer grows large quantities of wheat. [This is a modern abusive use of grow, but prevalent in Great Britain, and the British use begins to be imitated in America. Until within a few years, we never heard grow used as a transitive verb in New England, and the ear revolts at the practice.]




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [grow]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

GROW, v.i. pret. grew; pp. grown. [L. cresco.]

1. To enlarge in bulk or stature, by a natural, imperceptible addition of matter, through ducts and secreting organs, as animal and vegetable bodies; to vegetate as plants, or to be augmented by natural process, as animals. Thus, a plant grows from a seed to a shrub or tree, and a human being grows from a fetus to a man.

He causeth the grass to grow for cattle. Ps.104.

2. To be produced by vegetation; as, wheat grows in most parts of the world; rice grows only in warm climates.

3. To increase; to be augmented; to wax; as, a body grows larger by inflation or distension; intemperance is a growing evil.

4. To advance; to improve; to make progress; as, to grow in grace, in knowledge, in piety. The young man is growing in reputation.

5. To advance; to extend. His reputation is growing.

6. To come by degrees; to become; to reach any state; as, he grows more skillful, or more prudent. Let not vice grow to a habit, or into a habit.

7. To come forward; to advance. [Not much used.]

Winter began to grow fast on.

8. To be changed from one state to another; to become; as, to grow pale; to grow poor; to grow rich.

9. To proceed, as from a cause or reason. Lax morals may grow from errors in opinion.

10. To accrue; to come.

Why should damage grow to the hurt of the kings. Ezra.4.

11. To swell; to increase; as, the wind grew to a tempest.

To grow out of, to issue from; as plants from the soil, or as a branch from the main stem.

These wars have grown out of commercial considerations.

To grow up, to arrive at manhood, or to advance to full stature or maturity.

To grow up,

To grow together, To close and adhere; to become united by growth; as flesh or the bark of a tree severed.

Grow, signifies properly to shoot out, to enlarge; but it is often used to denote a passing from one state to another, and from greater to less.

Marriages grow less frequent.

[To grow less, is an abuse of this word; the phrase should be to become less.]

GROW, v.t. To produce; to raise; as, a farmer grows large quantities of wheat. [This is a modern abusive use of grow, but prevalent in Great Britain, and the British use begins to be imitated in America. Until within a few years, we never heard grow used as a transitive verb in New England, and the ear revolts at the practice.]


GROW, v.i. [pret. grew; pp. grown. Sax. growan; D. groeyen; Dan. groer; Sw. gro, a contracted word; W. crotiaw, crythu, to grow, to swell. This is probably the same word as L. cresco, Russ. rastu, rostu, a dialectical variation of crodh or grodh. The French croître, and Eng. increase, retain the final consonant.]

  1. To enlarge in bulk or stature, by a natural, imperceptible addition of matter, through ducts and secreting organs, as animal and vegetable bodies; to vegetate as plants, or to be augmented by natural process, as animals. Thus, a plant grows from a seed to a shrub or tree, and a human being grows from a fetus to a man. He causeth the grass to grow for cattle. Ps. civ.
  2. To be produced by vegetation; as, wheat grows in most parts of the world; rice grows only in warm climates.
  3. To increase; to be augmented; to wax; as, a body grows larger by inflation or distension; intemperance is a growing evil.
  4. To advance; to improve; to make progress; as, to grow in grace, in knowledge, in piety. The young man is growing in reputation.
  5. To advance; to extend. His reputation is growing.
  6. To come by degrees; to become; to reach any state; as, he grows more skillful, or more prudent. Let not vice grow to a habit, or into a habit.
  7. To come forward; to advance. [Not much used.] Winter began to grow fast on. – Knolles.
  8. To be changed from one state to another; to become; as, to grow pale; to grow poor; to grow rich.
  9. To proceed, as from a cause or reason. Lax morals may grow from errors in opinion.
  10. To accrue; to come. Why should damage grow to the hurt of the kings? – Ezra iv.
  11. To swell; to increase; as, the wind grew to a tempest. To grow out of, to issue from; as plants from the soil, or as a branch from the main stem. These wars have grown out of commercial considerations. – Federalist, Hamilton. To grow up, to arrive at manhood, or to advance to full stature or maturity. To grow up, or To grow together, To close and adhere; to become united by growth; as flesh or the bark of a tree severed. Grow signifies, properly, to shoot out, to enlarge; but it is often used to denote a passing from one state to another, and from greater to less. Marriages grow less frequent. – Paley. [To grow less, is an abuse of this word; the phrase should be to become less.]

GROW, v.t.

To produce; to raise; as, a farmer grows large quantities of wheat. [This is a modern abusive use of grow, but prevalent in Great Britain, and the British use begins to be imitated in America. Until within a few years we never heard grow used as a transitive verb in New England, and the ear revolts at the practice.]


Grow
  1. To increase in size by a natural and organic process; to increase in bulk by the gradual assimilation of new matter into the living organism; -- said of animals and vegetables and their organs.
  2. To cause to grow; to cultivate; to produce; as, to grow a crop; to grow wheat, hops, or tobacco.

    Macaulay.

    Syn. -- To raise; to cultivate. See Raise, v. t., 3.

  3. To increase in any way; to become larger and stronger; to be augmented; to advance; to extend; to wax; to accrue.

    Winter began to grow fast on. Knolles.

    Even just the sum that I do owe to you
    Is growing to me by Antipholus.
    Shak.

  4. To spring up and come to maturity in a natural way; to be produced by vegetation; to thrive; to flourish; as, rice grows in warm countries.

    Where law faileth, error groweth. Gower.

  5. To pass from one state to another; to result as an effect from a cause; to become; as, to grow pale.

    For his mind
    Had grown Suspicion's sanctuary.
    Byron.

  6. To become attached or fixed; to adhere.

    Our knees shall kneel till to the ground they grow. Shak.

    Growing cell, or Growing slide, a device for preserving alive a minute object in water continually renewed, in a manner to permit its growth to be watched under the microscope. -- Grown over, covered with a growth. -- To grow out of, to issue from, as plants from the soil, or as a branch from the main stem; to result from.

    These wars have grown out of commercial considerations. A. Hamilton.

    -- To grow up, to arrive at full stature or maturity; as, grown up children. -- To grow together, to close and adhere; to become united by growth, as flesh or the bark of a tree severed. Howells.

    Syn. -- To become; increase; enlarge; augment; improve; expand; extend.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Grow

GROW, verb intransitive preterit tense grew; participle passive grown. [Latin cresco.]

1. To enlarge in bulk or stature, by a natural, imperceptible addition of matter, through ducts and secreting organs, as animal and vegetable bodies; to vegetate as plants, or to be augmented by natural process, as animals. Thus, a plant grows from a seed to a shrub or tree, and a human being grows from a fetus to a man.

He causeth the grass to grow for cattle. Psalms 104:14.

2. To be produced by vegetation; as, wheat grows in most parts of the world; rice grows only in warm climates.

3. To increase; to be augmented; to wax; as, a body grows larger by inflation or distension; intemperance is a growing evil.

4. To advance; to improve; to make progress; as, to grow in grace, in knowledge, in piety. The young man is growing in reputation.

5. To advance; to extend. His reputation is growing.

6. To come by degrees; to become; to reach any state; as, he grows more skillful, or more prudent. Let not vice grow to a habit, or into a habit.

7. To come forward; to advance. [Not much used.]

Winter began to grow fast on.

8. To be changed from one state to another; to become; as, to grow pale; to grow poor; to grow rich.

9. To proceed, as from a cause or reason. Lax morals may grow from errors in opinion.

10. To accrue; to come.

Why should damage grow to the hurt of the kings. Ezra 4:22.

11. To swell; to increase; as, the wind grew to a tempest.

To grow out of, to issue from; as plants from the soil, or as a branch from the main stem.

These wars have grown out of commercial considerations.

To grow up, to arrive at manhood, or to advance to full stature or maturity.

To grow up,

To grow together, To close and adhere; to become united by growth; as flesh or the bark of a tree severed.

GROW, signifies properly to shoot out, to enlarge; but it is often used to denote a passing from one state to another, and from greater to less.

Marriages grow less frequent.

[To grow less, is an abuse of this word; the phrase should be to become less.]

GROW, verb transitive To produce; to raise; as, a farmer grows large quantities of wheat. [This is a modern abusive use of grow but prevalent in Great Britain, and the British use begins to be imitated in America. Until within a few years, we never heard grow used as a transitive verb in New England, and the ear revolts at the practice.]

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I use it mainly to see the meaning of English words as they were used closer to the time of the writing of Strong's Concordance.

— Ron (Indianapolis, IN)

Word of the Day

abuse

ABU'SE, v.t. s as z. [L. abutor, abusus of ab and utor, to use; Gr. to accustom. See Use.]

1. To use ill; to maltreat; to misuse; to use with bad motives or to wrong purposes; as, to abuse rights or privileges.

They that use this world as not abusing it. 1Cor. vii.

2. To violate; to defile by improper sexual intercourse.

3. To deceive; to impose on.

Nor be with all these tempting words abused.

4. To treat rudely, or with reproachful language; to revile.

He mocked and abused them shamefully.

5. To pervert the meaning of; to misapply; as to abuse words.

ABU'SE, n. Ill use; improper treatment or employment; application to a wrong purpose; as an abuse of our natural powers; an abuse of civil rights, or of religious privileges; abuse of advantages, &c.

Liberty may be endangered by the abuses of liberty, as well as by the abuses of power.

2. A corrupt practice or custom, as the abuses of government.

3. Rude speech; reproachful language addressed to a person; contumely; reviling words.

4. Seduction.

After the abuse he forsook me.

5. Perversion of meaning; improper use or application; as an abuse of words.

Random Word

piece

PIECE, n. [Heb. to cut off or clip.]

1. A fragment or part of any thing separated from the whole, in any manner, by cutting, splitting, breaking or tearing; as, to cut in pieces, break in pieces, tear in pieces, pull in pieces, &c.; a piece of a rock; a piece of paper.

2. A part of any thing, though not separated, or separated only in idea; not the whole; a portion; as a piece of excellent knowledge.

3. A distinct part or quantity; a part considered by itself, or separated from the rest only by a boundary or divisional line; as a piece of land in the meadow or on the mountain.

4. A separate part; a thing or portion distinct from others of a like kind; as a piece of timber; a piece of cloth; a piece of paper hangings.

5. A composition, essay or writing of no great length; as a piece of poetry or prose; a piece of music.

6. A separate performance; a distinct portion of labor; as a piece of work.

7. A picture or painting.

If unnatural, the finest colors are but daubing,and the piece is a beautiful monster at the best.

8. A coin; as a piece of eight.

9. A gun or single part of ordnance. We apply the word to a cannon, a mortar, or a musket. Large guns are called battering pieces; smaller guns are called field pieces.

10. In heraldry, an ordinary or charge. The fess, the bend, the pale, the bar, the cross, the saltier, the chevron are called honorable pieces.

11. In ridicule or contempt. A piece of a lawyer is a smatterer.

12. A castle; a building. [Not in use.]

A-piece, to each; as, he paid the men a dollar a-piece.

Of a piece, like; of the same sort, as if taken from the same whole. They seemed all of a piece. Sometimes followed by with.

The poet must be of a piece with the spectators to gain reputation.

PIECE, v.t. To enlarge or mend by the addition of a piece; to patch; as, to piece a garment; to piece the time.

To piece out, to extend or enlarge by addition of a piece or pieces.

PIECE, v.i. To unite by coalescence of parts; to be compacted, as parts into a whole.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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