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Wednesday - March 29, 2017

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [grave]

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grave

GRAVE, a final syllable, is a grove.

GRAVE, v.t. pret. graved; pp. graven or graved. [Gr. to write; originally all writing was graving; Eng. to scrape.]

1. To carve or cut letters or figures on stone or other hard substance, with a chisel or edged tool; to engrave. [The latter word is now more generally used.]

Thou shalt take two onyx-stones and grave on them the names of the children of Israel. Ex.28.

2. To carve; to form or shape by cutting with a chisel; as, to grave an image.

Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image. Ex.20.

3. To clean a ship's bottom by burning off filth, grass or other foreign matter, and paying it over with pitch.

4. To entomb. [Unusual.]

GRAVE, v.i. To carve; to write or delineate on hard substances; to practice engraving.

GRAVE, n. [L. scrobs.]

1. The ditch, pit or excavated place in which a dead human body is deposited; a place for the corpse of a human being; a sepulcher.

2. A tomb.

3. Any place where the dead are reposited; a place of great slaughter or mortality. Flanders was formerly the grave of English armies. Russia proved to be the grave of the French army under Bonaparte. The tropical climates are the grave of American seamen and of British soldiers.

4. Graves, in the plural, sediment of tallow melted. [Not in use or local.]



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [grave]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

GRAVE, a final syllable, is a grove.

GRAVE, v.t. pret. graved; pp. graven or graved. [Gr. to write; originally all writing was graving; Eng. to scrape.]

1. To carve or cut letters or figures on stone or other hard substance, with a chisel or edged tool; to engrave. [The latter word is now more generally used.]

Thou shalt take two onyx-stones and grave on them the names of the children of Israel. Ex.28.

2. To carve; to form or shape by cutting with a chisel; as, to grave an image.

Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image. Ex.20.

3. To clean a ship's bottom by burning off filth, grass or other foreign matter, and paying it over with pitch.

4. To entomb. [Unusual.]

GRAVE, v.i. To carve; to write or delineate on hard substances; to practice engraving.

GRAVE, n. [L. scrobs.]

1. The ditch, pit or excavated place in which a dead human body is deposited; a place for the corpse of a human being; a sepulcher.

2. A tomb.

3. Any place where the dead are reposited; a place of great slaughter or mortality. Flanders was formerly the grave of English armies. Russia proved to be the grave of the French army under Bonaparte. The tropical climates are the grave of American seamen and of British soldiers.

4. Graves, in the plural, sediment of tallow melted. [Not in use or local.]

GRAVE, a.1 [a final syllable, is a grave, Sax. græf; or it is an officer, Ger. graf.]


GRAVE, a.2 [Fr. Sp. and It. grave; Arm. grevus; from L. gravis, heavy, whence L. gravo, and aggravo, to aggravate. Hence grief – which see. Ar. كََرَبَ karaba, to overload, to press, to grieve. Class Rb, No. 30. Properly, pressing, heavy. Hence,]

  1. In music, low; depressed; solemn; opposed to sharp, acute, or high; as, a grave tone or sound. Sometimes grave denotes slow.
  2. Solemn; sober; serious; opposed to gay, light or jovial; as, a man of a grave deportment; a grave character. Youth on silent wings is flown; / Graver years come rolling on. Prior.
  3. Plain; not gay; not showy or tawdry; as, a grave suit of clothes.
  4. Being of weight; of a serious character; as, a grave writer.
  5. Important; momentous; having a serious and interesting import. Lord Eldon. Kent.

GRAVE, n. [Sax. græf; G. grab; D. and Sw. graf; Dan. grav; Russ. grob, a ditch, a trench, a grave; L. scrobs. See the verb.]

  1. The ditch, pit or excavated place in which a dead human body is deposited; a place for the corpse of a human being; a sepulcher.
  2. A tomb.
  3. Any place where the dead are reposited; a place of great slaughter or mortality. Flanders was formerly the grave of English armies. Russia proved to be the grave of the French army under Bonaparte. The tropical climates are the grave of American seamen and of British soldiers.
  4. Graves, in the plural, sediment of tallow melted. [Not in use or local.]

GRAVE, v.i.

To carve; to write or delineate on hard substances; to practice engraving.


GRAVE, v.t. [pret. graved; pp. graven or graved. Fr. graver; Sp. grabar; Sax. grafan; G. graben; D. graaven; Dan. graver; Sw. grafva; Arm. engraffi, engravi; Ir. grafadh, grafaim; W. criviaw, from rhiv; Gr. γραφω, to write; originally all writing was graving; Eng. to scrape; Ch. and Syr. כרב, to plow. See Class Rb, No. 30.]

  1. To carve or cut letters or figures on stone or other hard substance, with a chisel or edged tool; to engrave. [The latter word is now more generally used.] Thou shalt take two onyx-stones and grave on them the names of the children of Israel. Ex. xxviii.
  2. To carve; to form or shape by cutting with a chisel; as, to grave an image. Thou shalt not make to thee any graven image. Ex. xx.
  3. To clean a ship's bottom by burning off filth, grass or other foreign matter, and paying it over with pitch.
  4. To entomb. [Unusual.] Shak.
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Grave

GRAVE, a final syllable, is a grove.

GRAVE, verb transitive preterit tense graved; participle passive graven or graved. [Gr. to write; originally all writing was graving; Eng. to scrape.]

1. To carve or cut letters or figures on stone or other hard substance, with a chisel or edged tool; to engrave. [The latter word is now more generally used.]

Thou shalt take two onyx-stones and grave on them the names of the children of Israel. Exodus 28:9.

2. To carve; to form or shape by cutting with a chisel; as, to grave an image.

Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image. Exodus 20:4.

3. To clean a ship's bottom by burning off filth, grass or other foreign matter, and paying it over with pitch.

4. To entomb. [Unusual.]

GRAVE, verb intransitive To carve; to write or delineate on hard substances; to practice engraving.

GRAVE, noun [Latin scrobs.]

1. The ditch, pit or excavated place in which a dead human body is deposited; a place for the corpse of a human being; a sepulcher.

2. A tomb.

3. Any place where the dead are reposited; a place of great slaughter or mortality. Flanders was formerly the grave of English armies. Russia proved to be the grave of the French army under Bonaparte. The tropical climates are the grave of American seamen and of British soldiers.

4. Graves, in the plural, sediment of tallow melted. [Not in use or local.]

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Words are how God chooses tocommunicate with us. Knowing what they mean adds understanding to my heart of what He has done for me. Like the word redeem, in this dictionary gives amazing depth to what has transpired through Jesus's sacrifice for me.

— Sabrina (Chattanooga, TN)

Word of the Day

such

SUCH, a.

1. Of that kind; of the like kind. We never saw such a day; we have never had such a time as the present.

It has as before the thing to which it relates. Give your children such precepts as tend to make them wiser and better.

It is to be noted that the definitive adjective a, never precedes such, but is placed between it and the noun to which it refers; as such a man; such an honor.

2. The same that. This was the state of the kingdom at such time as the enemy landed.

3. The same as what has been mentioned.

That thou art happy, owe to God;

That thou continu'st such, owe to thyself.

4. Referring to what has been specified. I have commanded my servant to be at such a place.

5. Such and such, is used in reference to a person or place of a certain kind.

The sovereign authority may enact a law, commanding such and such an action.

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incorrigibleness

INCOR'RIGIBL'ENESS

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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