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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [grass]

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grass

GR`ASS, n.

1. In common usage, herbage; the plants which constitute the food of cattle and other beasts.

2. In botany, a plant having simple leaves, a stem generally jointed and tubular, a husky calyx, called glume, and the seed single. This definition includes wheat, rye, oats, barley, &c., and excludes clover and some other plants which are commonly called by the name of grass. The grasses form a numerous family of plants.

Grass of Parnassus, a plant, the Parnassia.

GR`ASS, v.t. To cover with grass or with turf.

GR`ASS, v.i. To breed grass; to be covered with grass.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [grass]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

GR`ASS, n.

1. In common usage, herbage; the plants which constitute the food of cattle and other beasts.

2. In botany, a plant having simple leaves, a stem generally jointed and tubular, a husky calyx, called glume, and the seed single. This definition includes wheat, rye, oats, barley, &c., and excludes clover and some other plants which are commonly called by the name of grass. The grasses form a numerous family of plants.

Grass of Parnassus, a plant, the Parnassia.

GR`ASS, v.t. To cover with grass or with turf.

GR`ASS, v.i. To breed grass; to be covered with grass.


GRASS, n. [Sax. græs, gærs, or græd; Goth. gras; G. and D. gras; Sw. gräs; Dan. græs. In G. rasen is turf, sod, and verrasen, to overgrow with grass; hence, g may be a prefix. Grass may be allied to Gr. αγρωστις, κραστις, γραστις.]

  1. In common usage, herbage; the plants which constitute the food of cattle and other beasts.
  2. In botany, a plant having simple leaves, a stem generally jointed and tubular, a husky calyx, called glume, and the seed single. This definition includes wheat, rye, oats, barley, &c. and excludes clover and some other plants which are commonly called by the name of grass. The grasses form a numerous family of plants. Encyc. Grass of Parnassus, a plant, the Parnassia.

GRASS, v.i.

To breed grass; to be covered with grass. Tusser.


GRASS, v.t.

To cover with grass or with turf.


Grass
  1. Popularly: Herbage; the plants which constitute the food of cattle and other beasts; pasture.
  2. To cover with grass or with turf.
  3. To produce grass.

    [R.] Tusser.
  4. An endogenous plant having simple leaves, a stem generally jointed and tubular, the husks or glumes in pairs, and the seed single.

    * This definition includes wheat, rye, oats, barley, etc., and excludes clover and some other plants which are commonly called by the name of grass. The grasses form a numerous family of plants.

  5. To expose, as flax, on the grass for bleaching, etc.
  6. The season of fresh grass; spring.

    [Colloq.]

    Two years old next grass. Latham.

  7. To bring to the grass or ground] to land; as, to grass a fish.

    [Colloq.]
  8. Metaphorically used for what is transitory.

    Surely the people is grass. Is. xl. 7.

    * The following list includes most of the grasses of the United States of special interest, except cereals. Many of these terms will be found with definitions in the Vocabulary. See Illustrations in Appendix.

    Barnyard grass, for hay. South. Panicum Grus- galli.

    Bent, pasture and hay. Agrostis, several species.

    Bermuda grass, pasture. South. Cynodon Dactylon.

    Black bent. Same as Switch grass (below).

    Blue bent, hay. North and West. Andropogon provincialis.

    Blue grass, pasture. Poa compressa.

    Blue joint, hay. Northwest. Aqropyrum glaucum.

    Buffalo grass, grazing. Rocky Mts., etc. (a) Buchloë dectyloides. (b) Same as Grama grass (below).

    Bunch grass, grazing. Far West. Eriocoma, Festuca, Stips, etc.

    Chess, or Cheat, a weed. Bromus secalinus, etc.

    Couch grass. Same as Quick grass (below).

    Crab grass, (a) Hay, in South. A weed, in North. Panicum sanguinale. (b) Pasture and hay. South. Eleusine Indica.

    Darnel (a) Bearded, a noxious weed. Lolium temulentum. (b) Common. Same as Rye grass (below).

    Drop seed, fair for forage and hay. Muhlenbergia, several species.

    English grass. Same as Redtop (below).

    Fowl meadow grass. (a) Pasture and hay. Poa serotina. (b) Hay, on moist land. Gryceria nervata.

    Gama grass, cut fodder. South. Tripsacum dactyloides.

    Grama grass, grazing. West and Pacific slope. Bouteloua oligostachya, etc.

    Great bunch grass, pasture and hay. Far West. Festuca scabrella.

    Guinea grass, hay. South. Panicum jumentorum.

    Herd's grass, in New England Timothy, in Pennsylvania and South Redtop.

    Indian grass. Same as Wood grass (below).

    Italian rye grass, forage and hay. Lolium Italicum.

    Johnson grass, grazing and hay. South and Southwest. Sorghum Halepense.

    Kentucky blue grass, pasture. Poa pratensis.

    Lyme grass, coarse hay. South. Elymus, several species.

    Manna grass, pasture and hay. Glyceria, several species.

    Meadow fescue, pasture and hay. Festuca elatior.

    Meadow foxtail, pasture, hay, lawn. North. Alopecurus pratensis.

    Meadow grass, pasture, hay, lawn. Poa, several species.

    Mesquite, or Muskit grass. Same as Grama grass (above).

    Nimble Will, a kind of drop seed. Muhlenbergia diffsa.

    Orchard grass, pasture and hay. Dactylis glomerata.

    Porcupine grass, troublesome to sheep. Northwest. Stipa spartea.

    Quaking grass, ornamental. Briza media and maxima.

    Quitch, or Quick, grass, etc., a weed. Agropyrum repens.

    Ray grass. Same as Rye grass (below).

    Redtop, pasture and hay. Agrostis vulgaris.

    Red-topped buffalo grass, forage. Northwest. Poa tenuifolia.

    Reed canary grass, of slight value. Phalaris arundinacea.

    Reed meadow grass, hay. North. Glyceria aquatica.

    Ribbon grass, a striped leaved form of Reed canary grass.

    Rye grass, pasture, hay. Lolium perenne, var.

    Seneca grass, fragrant basket work, etc. North. Hierochloa borealis.

    Sesame grass. Same as Gama grass (above).

    Sheep's fescue, sheep pasture, native in Northern Europe and Asia. Festuca ovina.

    Small reed grass, meadow pasture and hay. North. Deyeuxia Canadensis.

    Spear grass, Same as Meadow grass (above).

    Squirrel-tail grass, troublesome to animals. Seacoast and Northwest. Hordeum jubatum.

    Switch grass, hay, cut young. Panicum virgatum.

    Timothy, cut young, the best of hay. North. Phleum pratense.

    Velvet grass, hay on poor soil. South. Holcus lanatus.

    Vernal grass, pasture, hay, lawn. Anthoxanthum odoratum.

    Wire grass, valuable in pastures. Poa compressa.

    Wood grass, Indian grass, hay. Chrysopogon nutans.

    * Many plants are popularly called grasses which are not true grasses botanically considered, such as black grass, goose grass, star grass, etc.

    Black grass, a kind of small rush (Juncus Gerardi), growing in salt marshes, used for making salt hay. -- Grass of the Andes, an oat grass, the Arrhenatherum avenaceum of Europe.-- Grass of Parnassus, a plant of the genus Parnassia growing in wet ground. The European species is P. palustris; in the United States there are several species. -- Grass bass (Zoöl.), the calico bass. -- Grass bird, the dunlin. -- Grass cloth, a cloth woven from the tough fibers of the grass-cloth plant. -- Grass-cloth plant, a perennial herb of the Nettle family (Bœhmeria nivea or Urtica nivea), which grows in Sumatra, China, and Assam, whose inner bark has fine and strong fibers suited for textile purposes. -- Grass finch. (Zoöl.) (a) A common American sparrow (Poöcætes gramineus); -- called also vesper sparrow and bay-winged bunting. (b) Any Australian finch, of the genus Poëphila, of which several species are known. -- Grass lamb, a lamb suckled by a dam running on pasture land and giving rich milk.-- Grass land, land kept in grass and not tilled. -- Grass moth (Zoöl.), one of many small moths of the genus Crambus, found in grass. -- Grass oil, a fragrant essential volatile oil, obtained in India from grasses of the genus Andropogon, etc.; -- used in perfumery under the name of citronella, ginger grass oil, lemon grass oil, essence of verbena etc. -- Grass owl (Zoöl.), a South African owl (Strix Capensis). -- Grass parrakeet (Zoöl.), any of several species of Australian parrots, of the genus Euphemia; -- also applied to the zebra parrakeet. -- Grass plover (Zoöl.), the upland or field plover. -- Grass poly (Bot.), a species of willowwort (Lythrum Hyssopifolia). Johnson. -- Crass quit (Zoöl.), one of several tropical American finches of the genus Euetheia. The males have most of the head and chest black and often marked with yellow. -- Grass snake. (Zoöl.) (a) The common English, or ringed, snake (Tropidonotus natrix). (b) The common green snake of the Northern United States. See Green snake, under Green. -- Grass snipe (Zoöl.), the pectoral sandpiper (Tringa maculata); -- called also jacksnipe in America. -- Grass spider (Zoöl.), a common spider (Agelena nævia), which spins flat webs on grass, conspicuous when covered with dew. -- Grass sponge (Zoöl.), an inferior kind of commercial sponge from Florida and the Bahamas. -- Grass table. (Arch.) See Earth table, under Earth. -- Grass vetch (Bot.), a vetch (Lathyrus Nissolia), with narrow grasslike leaves. -- Grass widow. [Cf. Prov. R. an unmarried mother, G. strohwittwe a mock widow, Sw. gräsenka a grass widow.] (a) An unmarried woman who is a mother. [Obs.] (b) A woman separated from her husband by abandonment or prolonged absence; a woman living apart from her husband. [Slang.] -- Grass wrack (Bot.) eelgrass. -- To bring to grass (Mining.), to raise, as ore, to the surface of the ground. -- To put to grass, To put out to grass, to put out to graze a season, as cattle.

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Grass

GR'ASS, noun

1. In common usage, herbage; the plants which constitute the food of cattle and other beasts.

2. In botany, a plant having simple leaves, a stem generally jointed and tubular, a husky calyx, called glume, and the seed single. This definition includes wheat, rye, oats, barley, etc., and excludes clover and some other plants which are commonly called by the name of grass The grasses form a numerous family of plants.

Grass of Parnassus, a plant, the Parnassia.

GR'ASS, verb transitive To cover with grass or with turf.

GR'ASS, verb intransitive To breed grass; to be covered with grass

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— Cindy (Clayton, NC)

Word of the Day

good

GOOD, a.

1. Valid; legally firm; not weak or defective; having strength adequate to its support; as a good title; a good deed; a good claim.

2. Valid; sound; not weak, false or fallacious; as a good argument.

3. Complete or sufficiently perfect in its kind; having the physical qualities best adapted to its design and use; opposed to bad,imperfect, corrupted, impaired. We say, good timber, good cloth, a good soil, a good color.

And God saw every thing that he had made, and

behold, it was very good. Gen.1.

4. Having moral qualities best adapted to its design and use, or the qualities which God's law requires; virtuous; pious; religious; applied to persons, and opposed to bad, vitious, wicked, evil.

Yet peradventure for a good man some would

even dare to die. Rom.5.

5. Conformable to the moral law; virtuous; applied to actions.

In all things showing thyself a pattern of good works.

Tit.2.

6. Proper; fit; convenient; seasonable; well adapted to the end. It was a good time to commence operations. He arrived in good time.

7. Convenient; useful; expedient; conducive to happiness.

It is not good that the man should be alone. Gen.2.

8. Sound; perfect; uncorrupted; undamaged. This fruit will keep good the whole year.

9. Suitable to the taste or to health; wholesome; salubrious; palatable; not disagreeable or noxious; as fruit good to eat; a tree good for food. Gen.2.

10. Suited to produce a salutary effect; adapted to abate or cure; medicinal; salutary; beneficial; as, fresh vegetables are good for scorbutic diseases.

11. Suited to strengthen or assist the healthful functions; as, a little wine is good for a weak stomach.

12. Pleasant to the taste; as a good apple.

My son, eat thou honey, because it is good, and the honeycomb, which is sweet to thy taste. Prov.24.

13. Full; complete.

The protestant subjects of the abbey make up a good third of its people.

14. Useful; valuable; having qualities or a tendency to produce a good effect.

All quality, that is good for any thing,is originally founded on merit.

15. Equal; adequate; competent. His security is good for the amount of the debt; applied to persons able to fulfill contracts.

Antonio is a good man.

16. Favorable; convenient for any purpose; as a good stand for business; a good station for a camp.

17. Convenient; suitable; safe; as a good harbor for ships.

18. Well qualified; able; skillful; or performing duties with skill and fidelity; as a good prince; a good commander; a good officer; a good physician.

19. Ready; dexterous.

Those are generally good at flattering who are good for nothing else.

20. Kind; benevolent; affectionate; as a good father; good will.

21. Kind; affectionate; faithful; as a good friend.

22. Promotive of happiness; pleasant; agreeable; cheering; gratifying.

Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity. Ps.133.

23. Pleasant or prosperous; as, good morrow, Sir; good morning.

24. Honorable; fair; unblemished; unimpeached; as a man of good fame or report.

A good name is better than precious ointment.

Eccles.7.

25. Cheerful; favorable to happiness. Be of good comfort.

26. Great or considerable; not small nor very great; as a good while ago; he is a good way off, or at a good distance; he has a good deal of leisure; I had a good share of the trouble. Here we see the primary sense of extending, advancing.

27. Elegant; polite; as good breeding.

28. Real; serious; not feigned.

Love not in good earnest.

29. Kind; favorable; benevolent; humane.

The men were very good to us. 1 Sam.25.

30. Benevolent; merciful; gracious.

Truly God is good to Israel, even to such as are

of a clean heart. Ps.73.

31. Seasonable; commendable; proper.

Why trouble ye the woman, for she hath

wrought a good work on me. Matt.26.

32. Pleasant; cheerful; festive.

We come in a good day. 1 Sam.25.

33. Companionable; social; merry.

It is well known, that Sir Roger had been a good fellow in his youth.

34. Brave; in familiar language. You are a good fellow.

35. In the phrases, the good man, applied to the master of the house,and good woman, applied to the mistress, good sometimes expresses a moderate degree of respect, and sometimes slight contempt. Among the first settlers of New England, it was used as a title instead of Mr.; as Goodman Jones; Goodman Wells.

36. The phrase good will is equivalent to benevolence; but it signifies also an earnest desire, a hearty wish, entire willingness or fervent zeal; as, we entered into the service with a good will; he laid on stripes with a good will.

37. Comely; handsome; well formed; as a good person or shape.

38. Mild; pleasant; expressing benignity or other estimable qualities; as a good countenance.

39. Mild; calm; not irritable or fractious; as a good temper.

40. Kind; friendly; humane; as a good heart or disposition.

Good advice, wise and prudent counsel.

Good heed, great care; due caution.

In good south, in good truth; in reality.

To make good, to perform; to fulfill; as, to make good one's word or promise; that is to make it entire or unbroken.

1. To confirm or establish; to prove; to verify; as, to make good a charge or accusation.

2. To supply deficiency; to make up a defect or loss. I will make good what is wanting.

3. To indemnify; to give an equivalent for damages. If you suffer loss, I will make it good to you.

4. To maintain; to carry into effect; as, to make good a retreat.

To stand good, to be firm or valid. His word or promise stands good.

To think good, to see good, is to be pleased or satisfied; to think to be expedient.

If ye think good, give me my price. Zech.11.

As good as, equally; no better than; the same as. We say, one is as good as dead. Heb.11.

As good as his word, equaling in fulfillment what was promised; performing to the extent.

GOOD, n. That which contributes to diminish or remove pain, or to increase happiness or prosperity; benefit; advantage; opposed to evil or misery. The medicine will do neither good nor harm. It does my heart good to see you so happy.

There are many that say, who will show us any good. Ps.4.

1. Welfare; prosperity; advancement of interest or happiness. He labored for the good of the state.

The good of the whole community can be promoted only by advancing the good of each of the members composing it.

2. Spiritual advantage or improvement; as the good of souls.

3. Earnest; not jest.

The good woman never died after this, till she came to die for good and all.

The phrase, for good and all, signifies, finally; to close the whole business; for the last time.

4. Moral works; actions which are just and in conformity to the moral law or divine precepts.

Depart from evil, and do good. Ps.34.

5. Moral qualities; virtue; righteousness.

I find no good in this man.

6. The best fruits; richness; abundance.

I will give you the good of the land. Gen.45.

GOOD, v.t. To manure. [Not in use.]

GOOD, adv. As good, as well; with equal advantage. Had you not as good go with me? In America we use goods,the Gothic word. Had you not as goods go?

In replies, good signifies well; right; it is satisfactory; I am satisfied. I will be with you to morrow; answer, good, very good. So we use well, from the root of L. valeo, to be strong.

Random Word

deploration

DEPLORATION, n. The act of lamenting. In music, a dirge or mournful strain.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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