HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Sunday - September 24, 2017

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [grace]

0
2
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

grace

GRACE, n. [L. gratia, which is formed on the Celtic; Eng. agree, congruous, and ready. The primary sense of gratus, is free, ready, quick, willing, prompt, from advancing.]

1. Favor; good will; kindness; disposition to oblige another; as a grant made as an act of grace.

Or each, or all, may win a lady's grace.

2. Appropriately, the free unmerited love and favor of God, the spring and source of all the benefits men receive from him.

And if by grace,then it is no more of works. Rom.11.

3. Favorable influence of God; divine influence or the influence of the spirit, in renewing the heart and restraining from sin.

My grace is sufficient for thee. 2 Cor.12.

4. The application of Christ's righteousness to the sinner.

Where sin abounded, grace did much more abound. Rom.5.

5. A state of reconciliation to God. Rom.5.2.

6. Virtuous or religious affection or disposition, as a liberal disposition, faith, meekness, humility, patience, &c. proceeding from divine influence.

7. Spiritual instruction, improvement and edification. Eph.4.29.

8. Apostleship, or the qualifications of an apostle. Eph. 3.8.

9. Eternal life; final salvation. 1 Pet.1.13.

10. Favor; mercy; pardon.

Bow and sue for grace

With suppliant knee.

11. Favor conferred.

I should therefore esteem it a great favor and grace.

12. Privilege.

To few great Jupiter imparts this grace.

13. That in manner, deportment or language which renders it appropriate and agreeable; suitableness; elegance with appropriate dignity. We say, a speaker delivers his address with grace; a man performs his part with grace.

Grace was in all her steps.

Her purple habit sits with such a grace

On her smooth shoulders.

14. Natural or acquired excellence; any endowment that recommends the possessor to others; as the graces of wit and learning.

15. Beauty; embellishment; in general, whatever adorns and recommends to favor; sometimes, a single beauty.

I pass their form and every charming grace.

16. Beauty deified; among pagans, a goddess. The graces were three in number, Aglaia, Thalia, and Euphrosyne, the constant attendants of Venus.

The loves delighted, and the graces played.

17. Virtue physical; as the grace of plants. [Not used.]

18. The title of a duke or an archbishop, and formerly of the king of England, meaning your goodness or clemency. His Grace the Duke of York. Your Grace will please to accept my thanks.

19. A short prayer before or after meat; a blessing asked, or thanks rendered.

20. In music, graces signifies turns, trills and shakes introduced for embellishment.

Day in grace, in theology, time of probation, when an offer is made to sinners.

Days in grace, in commerce, the days immediately following the day when a bill or note becomes due, which days are allowed to the debtor or payor to make payment in. In Great Britain and the United States the days of grace are three, but in other countries more; the usages of merchants being different.

GRACE, v.t. To adorn; to decorate; to embellish and dignify.

Great Jove and Phoebus graced his noble line.

And hail, ye fair, of every charm possess'd,

Who grace this rising empire of the west.

1. To dignify or raise by act of favor; to honor.

He might at his pleasure grace or disgrace whom

he would in court.

2. To favor; to honor.

3. To supply with heavenly grace.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [grace]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

GRACE, n. [L. gratia, which is formed on the Celtic; Eng. agree, congruous, and ready. The primary sense of gratus, is free, ready, quick, willing, prompt, from advancing.]

1. Favor; good will; kindness; disposition to oblige another; as a grant made as an act of grace.

Or each, or all, may win a lady's grace.

2. Appropriately, the free unmerited love and favor of God, the spring and source of all the benefits men receive from him.

And if by grace,then it is no more of works. Rom.11.

3. Favorable influence of God; divine influence or the influence of the spirit, in renewing the heart and restraining from sin.

My grace is sufficient for thee. 2 Cor.12.

4. The application of Christ's righteousness to the sinner.

Where sin abounded, grace did much more abound. Rom.5.

5. A state of reconciliation to God. Rom.5.2.

6. Virtuous or religious affection or disposition, as a liberal disposition, faith, meekness, humility, patience, &c. proceeding from divine influence.

7. Spiritual instruction, improvement and edification. Eph.4.29.

8. Apostleship, or the qualifications of an apostle. Eph. 3.8.

9. Eternal life; final salvation. 1 Pet.1.13.

10. Favor; mercy; pardon.

Bow and sue for grace

With suppliant knee.

11. Favor conferred.

I should therefore esteem it a great favor and grace.

12. Privilege.

To few great Jupiter imparts this grace.

13. That in manner, deportment or language which renders it appropriate and agreeable; suitableness; elegance with appropriate dignity. We say, a speaker delivers his address with grace; a man performs his part with grace.

Grace was in all her steps.

Her purple habit sits with such a grace

On her smooth shoulders.

14. Natural or acquired excellence; any endowment that recommends the possessor to others; as the graces of wit and learning.

15. Beauty; embellishment; in general, whatever adorns and recommends to favor; sometimes, a single beauty.

I pass their form and every charming grace.

16. Beauty deified; among pagans, a goddess. The graces were three in number, Aglaia, Thalia, and Euphrosyne, the constant attendants of Venus.

The loves delighted, and the graces played.

17. Virtue physical; as the grace of plants. [Not used.]

18. The title of a duke or an archbishop, and formerly of the king of England, meaning your goodness or clemency. His Grace the Duke of York. Your Grace will please to accept my thanks.

19. A short prayer before or after meat; a blessing asked, or thanks rendered.

20. In music, graces signifies turns, trills and shakes introduced for embellishment.

Day in grace, in theology, time of probation, when an offer is made to sinners.

Days in grace, in commerce, the days immediately following the day when a bill or note becomes due, which days are allowed to the debtor or payor to make payment in. In Great Britain and the United States the days of grace are three, but in other countries more; the usages of merchants being different.

GRACE, v.t. To adorn; to decorate; to embellish and dignify.

Great Jove and Phoebus graced his noble line.

And hail, ye fair, of every charm possess'd,

Who grace this rising empire of the west.

1. To dignify or raise by act of favor; to honor.

He might at his pleasure grace or disgrace whom

he would in court.

2. To favor; to honor.

3. To supply with heavenly grace.

GRACE, n. [Fr. grace; It. grazia; Sp. gracia; Ir. grasa; from the L. gratia, which is formed on the Celtic; W. rhad, grace, a blessing, a gratuity. It coincides in origin with Fr. gré, Eng. agree, congruous, and ready. The primary sense of gratus, is free, ready, quick, willing, prompt, from advancing. Class Rd. See Grade.]

  1. Favor; good will; kindness; disposition to oblige another; as, a grant made as an act of grace. Or each, or all, may win a lady's grace. Dryden.
  2. Appropriately, the free unmerited love and favor of God, the spring and source of all the benefits men receive from. And if by grace, then it is no more of works. Rom. xi.
  3. Favorable influence of God; divine influence or the influence of the spirit, in renewing the heart and restraining from sin. My grace is sufficient for thee. 2. Cor. xii.
  4. The application of Christ's righteousness to the sinner. Where sin abounded, grace did much more abound. Rom. v.
  5. A state of reconciliation to God. Rom. v. 2.
  6. Virtuous or religious affection or disposition, as a liberal disposition, faith, meekness, humility, patience, &c., proceeding from divine influence.
  7. Spiritual instruction, improvement and edification. Eph. iv. 29.
  8. Apostleship, or the qualifications of an apostle. Eph. iii.8.
  9. Eternal life; final salvation. 1 Pet. i. 13.
  10. Favor; mercy; pardon. Bow and sue for grace With suppliant knee. Milton.
  11. Favor conferred. I should therefore esteem it a great favor and grace. Prior.
  12. Privilege. To few great Jupiter imparts this grace. Dryden.
  13. That in manner, deportment or language, which renders it appropriate and agreeable; suitableness; elegance with appropriate dignity. We say, a speaker delivers his address with grace; a man performs his part with grace. Grace was in all her steps. Milton. Her purple habit sits with such a grace / On her smooth shoulders. Dryden.
  14. Natural or acquired excellence; any endowment that recommends the possessor to others; as, the graces of wit and learning. Hooker.
  15. Beauty; embellishment; in general, whatever adorns and recommends to favor; sometimes, a single beauty. I pass their form and every charming grace. Dryden.
  16. Beauty deified; among pagans, a goddess. The graces were three in number, Aglaia, Thalia, and Euphrosyne, the constant attendants of Venus. Lempriere. The loves delighted, and the graces played. Prior.
  17. Virtue physical; as, the grace of plants. [Not used.] Shak.
  18. The title of a duke or an archbishop, and formerly of the king of England, meaning your goodness or clemency. His Grace the Duke of York. Your Grace will please to accept my thanks.
  19. A short prayer before or after meat; a blessing asked, or thanks rendered.
  20. In music, graces signifies turns, trills and shakes introduced for embellishment.
  21. The gospel. Receive not the grace of God in vain. St. Paul.
  22. In English universities, an act, vote or decree of the government of the institution. Day of grace, in theology, time of probation, when an offer is made to sinners. Days of grace, in commerce, the days immediately following the day when a bill or note becomes due, which days are allowed to the debtor or payor to make payment in. In Great Britain and the United States the days of grace are three, but in other countries more; the usages of merchants being different.

GRACE, v.t.

  1. To adorn; to decorate; to embellish and dignify. Great Jove and Phoebus graced his noble line. Pope. And hail, ye fair, of every charm possess'd, Who grace this rising empire of the west. D. Humphrey.
  2. To dignify or raise by an act of favor; to honor. He might at his pleasure grace or disgrace whom he would in court. Knolles.
  3. To favor; to honor. Dryden.
  4. To supply with heavenly grace. Bp. Hall.

Grace
  1. The exercise of love, kindness, mercy, favor; disposition to benefit or serve another; favor bestowed or privilege conferred.

    To bow and sue for grace
    With suppliant knee.
    Milton.

  2. To adorn] to decorate; to embellish and dignify.

    Great Jove and Phoebus graced his noble line. Pope.

    We are graced with wreaths of victory. Shak.

  3. The divine favor toward man; the mercy of God, as distinguished from His justice; also, any benefits His mercy imparts; divine love or pardon; a state of acceptance with God; enjoyment of the divine favor.

    And if by grace, then is it no more of works. Rom. xi. 6.

    My grace is sufficicnt for thee. 2 Cor. xii. 9.

    Where sin abounded, grace did much more abound. Rom. v. 20.

    By whom also we have access by faith into this grace wherein we stand. Rom. v.2

  4. To dignify or raise by an act of favor; to honor.

    He might, at his pleasure, grace or disgrace whom he would
    in court.
    Knolles.

  5. The prerogative of mercy execised by the executive, as pardon.

    (b)
  6. To supply with heavenly grace.

    Bp. Hall.
  7. Fortune; luck; -- used commonly with hard or sorry when it means misfortune.

    [Obs.] Chaucer.
  8. To add grace notes, cadenzas, etc., to.
  9. Inherent excellence; any endowment or characteristic fitted to win favor or confer pleasure or benefit.

    He is complete in feature and in mind.
    With all good grace to grace a gentleman.
    Shak.

    I have formerly given the general character of Mr. Addison's style and manner as natural and unaffected, easy and polite, and full of those graces which a flowery imagination diffuses over writing. Blair.

  10. Beauty, physical, intellectual, or moral; loveliness; commonly, easy elegance of manners; perfection of form.

    Grace in women gains the affections sooner, and secures them longer, than any thing else. Hazlitt.

    I shall answer and thank you again For the gift and the grace of the gift. Longfellow.

  11. Graceful and beautiful females, sister goddesses, represented by ancient writers as the attendants sometimes of Apollo but oftener of Venus. They were commonly mentioned as three in number; namely, Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia, and were regarded as the inspirers of the qualities which give attractiveness to wisdom, love, and social intercourse.

    The Graces love to weave the rose. Moore.

    The Loves delighted, and the Graces played. Prior.

  12. The title of a duke, a duchess, or an archbishop, and formerly of the king of England.

    How fares your Grace ! Shak.

  13. Thanks.

    [Obs.]

    Yielding graces and thankings to their lord Melibeus. Chaucer.

  14. A petition for grace; a blessing asked, or thanks rendered, before or after a meal.
  15. Ornamental notes or short passages, either introduced by the performer, or indicated by the composer, in which case the notation signs are called grace notes, appeggiaturas, turns, etc.
  16. An act, vote, or decree of the government of the institution; a degree or privilege conferred by such vote or decree.

    Walton.
  17. A play designed to promote or display grace of motion. It consists in throwing a small hoop from one player to another, by means of two sticks in the hands of each. Called also grace hoop or hoops.

    Act of grace. See under Act. -- Day of grace (Theol.), the time of probation, when the offer of divine forgiveness is made and may be accepted.

    That day of grace fleets fast away. I. Watts.

    -- Days of grace (Com.), the days immediately following the day when a bill or note becomes due, which days are allowed to the debtor or payer to make payment in. In Great Britain and the United States, the days of grace are three, but in some countries more, the usages of merchants being different. -- Good graces, favor; friendship. -- Grace cup. (a) A cup or vessel in which a health is drunk after grace. (b) A health drunk after grace has been said.

    The grace cup follows to his sovereign's health. Hing.

    -- Grace drink, a drink taken on rising from the table; a grace cup.

    To [Queen Margaret, of Scotland] . . . we owe the custom of the grace drink, she having established it as a rule at her table, that whosoever staid till grace was said was rewarded with a bumper. Encyc. Brit.

    -- Grace hoop, a hoop used in playing graces. See Grace, n., 13. -- Grace note (Mus.), an appoggiatura. See Appoggiatura, and def. 11 above. -- Grace stroke, a finishing stoke or touch; a coup de grace. -- Means of grace, means of securing knowledge of God, or favor with God, as the preaching of the gospel, etc. -- To do grace, to reflect credit upon.

    Content to do the profession some grace. Shak.

    -- To say grace, to render thanks before or after a meal. -- With a good grace, in a fit and proper manner grace fully; graciously. -- With a bad grace, in a forced, reluctant, or perfunctory manner; ungraciously.

    What might have been done with a good grace would at least
    be done with a bad grace.
    Macaulay.

    Syn. -- Elegance; comeliness; charm; favor; kindness; mercy. -- Grace, Mercy. These words, though often interchanged, have each a distinctive and peculiar meaning. Grace, in the strict sense of the term, is spontaneous favor to the guilty or undeserving; mercy is kindness or compassion to the suffering or condemned. It was the grace of God that opened a way for the exercise of mercy toward men. See Elegance.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

39

387

30

420

42

395
Grace

GRACE, noun [Latin gratia, which is formed on the Celtic; Eng. agree, congruous, and ready. The primary sense of gratus, is free, ready, quick, willing, prompt, from advancing.]

1. Favor; good will; kindness; disposition to oblige another; as a grant made as an act of grace

Or each, or all, may win a lady's grace

2. Appropriately, the free unmerited love and favor of God, the spring and source of all the benefits men receive from him.

And if by grace then it is no more of works. Romans 11:5.

3. Favorable influence of God; divine influence or the influence of the spirit, in renewing the heart and restraining from sin.

My grace is sufficient for thee. 2 Corinthians 12:9.

4. The application of Christ's righteousness to the sinner.

Where sin abounded, grace did much more abound. Romans 5:2.

5. A state of reconciliation to God. Romans 5:2:2.

6. Virtuous or religious affection or disposition, as a liberal disposition, faith, meekness, humility, patience, etc. proceeding from divine influence.

7. Spiritual instruction, improvement and edification. Ephesians 4:29.

8. Apostleship, or the qualifications of an apostle. Ephesians 3:8.

9. Eternal life; final salvation. 1 Peter 1:13.

10. Favor; mercy; pardon.

Bow and sue for grace

With suppliant knee.

11. Favor conferred.

I should therefore esteem it a great favor and grace

12. Privilege.

To few great Jupiter imparts this grace

13. That in manner, deportment or language which renders it appropriate and agreeable; suitableness; elegance with appropriate dignity. We say, a speaker delivers his address with grace; a man performs his part with grace

GRACE was in all her steps.

Her purple habit sits with such a grace

On her smooth shoulders.

14. Natural or acquired excellence; any endowment that recommends the possessor to others; as the graces of wit and learning.

15. Beauty; embellishment; in general, whatever adorns and recommends to favor; sometimes, a single beauty.

I pass their form and every charming grace

16. Beauty deified; among pagans, a goddess. The graces were three in number, Aglaia, Thalia, and Euphrosyne, the constant attendants of Venus.

The loves delighted, and the graces played.

17. Virtue physical; as the grace of plants. [Not used.]

18. The title of a duke or an archbishop, and formerly of the king of England, meaning your goodness or clemency. His grace the Duke of York. Your grace will please to accept my thanks.

19. A short prayer before or after meat; a blessing asked, or thanks rendered.

20. In music, graces signifies turns, trills and shakes introduced for embellishment.

Day in grace in theology, time of probation, when an offer is made to sinners.

Days in grace in commerce, the days immediately following the day when a bill or note becomes due, which days are allowed to the debtor or payor to make payment in. In Great Britain and the United States the days of grace are three, but in other countries more; the usages of merchants being different.

GRACE, verb transitive To adorn; to decorate; to embellish and dignify.

Great Jove and Phoebus graced his noble line.

And hail, ye fair, of every charm possess'd,

Who grace this rising empire of the west.

1. To dignify or raise by act of favor; to honor.

He might at his pleasure grace or disgrace whom

he would in court.

2. To favor; to honor.

3. To supply with heavenly grace

Why 1828?

0
2
 


Because it's closest to the original language . . . I also choose the K.J.V. Bible for the same reason. I have found these to be most dependable for giving me the original definitions and scripture verses. I recommend everyone use these too . . .

— Carl (Dundee, MI)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

branlin

BRAN'LIN, n. A species of fish of the salmon kind, in some places called the fingry, from five or six black lines or marks on each side resembling fingers. It is found in rapid streams.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

95

198

Compact Edition

77

46

CD-ROM

58

35

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.295 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top