HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Friday - April 28, 2017

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [gold]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

gold

GOLD, n.

1. A precious metal of a bright yellow color, and the most ductile and malleable of all the metals. It is the heaviest metal except platina; and being a very dense, fixed substance, and not liable to be injured by air, it is well fitted to be used as coin, or a representative of commodities in commerce. Its ductility and malleability render it the most suitable metal for gilding. It is often found native in solid masses, as in Hungary and Peru; though generally in combination with silver, copper or iron.

2. Money.

For me, the gold of France did not seduce--

3. Something pleasing or valuable; as a heart of gold.

4. A bright yellow color; as a flower edged with gold.

5. Riches; wealth.

Gold of pleasure, a plant of the genus Myagrum.

GOLD, a. Made of gold; consisting of gold; as a gold chain.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [gold]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

GOLD, n.

1. A precious metal of a bright yellow color, and the most ductile and malleable of all the metals. It is the heaviest metal except platina; and being a very dense, fixed substance, and not liable to be injured by air, it is well fitted to be used as coin, or a representative of commodities in commerce. Its ductility and malleability render it the most suitable metal for gilding. It is often found native in solid masses, as in Hungary and Peru; though generally in combination with silver, copper or iron.

2. Money.

For me, the gold of France did not seduce--

3. Something pleasing or valuable; as a heart of gold.

4. A bright yellow color; as a flower edged with gold.

5. Riches; wealth.

Gold of pleasure, a plant of the genus Myagrum.

GOLD, a. Made of gold; consisting of gold; as a gold chain.


GOLD, a.

Made of gold; consisting of gold; as a gold chain.


GOLD, n. [Sax. gold; G. gold; D. goud, a contracted word; Sw. and Dan. guld, from gul, guul, yellow. Hence the original pronunciation goold, still retained by some people. The Dan. guul is in Sax. gealew, whence our yellow, that is, primarily, bright, from the Celtic, W. gawl, galau, gole, light, splendor; Gaelic, geal, bright; Ar. جَلاَ chala to be clear or bright. Class Gl, No. 7.]

  1. A precious metal of a bright yellow color, and the most ductile and malleable of all the metals. It is the heaviest metal except platinum and being a very dense, fixed substance, and not liable to be injured by air, it is well fitted to be used as coin, or a representative of commodities in commerce. Its ductility and malleability render it the most suitable metal for gilding. It is often found native in solid masses, as in Hungary and Peru; though generally in combination with silver, copper or iron. Encyc.
  2. Money. For me, the gold of France did not seduce. Shak.
  3. Something pleasing or valuable; as, a heart of gold. Shak.
  4. A bright yellow color; as, a flower edged with gold.
  5. Riches; wealth. Gold of pleasure, a plant of the genus Myagrum.

Gold
  1. An old English name of some yellow flower, -- the marigold (Calendula), according to Dr. Prior, but in Chaucer perhaps the turnsole.
  2. A metallic element, constituting the most precious metal used as a common commercial medium of exchange. It has a characteristic yellow color, is one of the heaviest substances known (specific gravity 19.32), is soft, and very malleable and ductile. It is quite unalterable by heat, moisture, and most corrosive agents, and therefore well suited for its use in coin and jewelry. Symbol Au (Aurum). Atomic weight 196.7.

    * Native gold contains usually eight to ten per cent of silver, but often much more. As the amount of silver increases, the color becomes whiter and the specific gravity lower. Gold is very widely disseminated, as in the sands of many rivers, but in very small quantity. It usually occurs in quartz veins (gold quartz), in slate and metamorphic rocks, or in sand and alluvial soil, resulting from the disintegration of such rocks. It also occurs associated with other metallic substances, as in auriferous pyrites, and is combined with tellurium in the minerals petzite, calaverite, sylvanite, etc. Pure gold is too soft for ordinary use, and is hardened by alloying with silver and copper, the latter giving a characteristic reddish tinge. [See Carat.] Gold also finds use in gold foil, in the pigment purple of Cassius, and in the chloride, which is used as a toning agent in photography.

  3. Money; riches; wealth.

    For me, the gold of France did not seduce. Shak.

  4. A yellow color, like that of the metal; as, a flower tipped with gold.
  5. Figuratively, something precious or pure; as, hearts of gold.

    Shak.

    Age of gold. See Golden age, under Golden. -- Dutch gold, Fool's gold, Gold dust, etc. See under Dutch, Dust, etc. -- Gold amalgam, a mineral, found in Columbia and California, composed of gold and mercury. -- Gold beater, one whose occupation is to beat gold into gold leaf. -- Gold beater's skin, the prepared outside membrane of the large intestine of the ox, used for separating the leaves of metal during the process of gold-beating. -- Gold beetle (Zoöl.), any small gold-colored beetle of the family Chrysomelidæ; -- called also golden beetle. -- Gold blocking, printing with gold leaf, as upon a book cover, by means of an engraved block. Knight. -- Gold cloth. See Cloth of gold, under Cloth. -- Gold Coast, a part of the coast of Guinea, in West Africa. -- Gold cradle. (Mining) See Cradle, n., 7. -- Gold diggings, the places, or region, where gold is found by digging in sand and gravel from which it is separated by washing. -- Gold end, a fragment of broken gold or jewelry. -- Gold-end man. (a) A buyer of old gold or jewelry. (b) A goldsmith's apprentice. (c) An itinerant jeweler. "I know him not: he looks like a gold-end man." B. Jonson. -- Gold fever, a popular mania for gold hunting. -- Gold field, a region in which are deposits of gold. -- Gold finder. (a) One who finds gold. (b) One who empties privies. [Obs. *** Low] Swift. -- Gold flower, a composite plant with dry and persistent yellow radiating involucral scales, the Helichrysum St&oelig]chas of Southern Europe. There are many South African species of the same genus. -- Gold foil, thin sheets of gold, as used by dentists and others. See Gold leaf. -- Gold knobs or knoppes (Bot.), buttercups. -- Gold lace, a kind of lace, made of gold thread. -- Gold latten, a thin plate of gold or gilded metal. -- Gold leaf, gold beaten into a film of extreme thinness, and used for gilding, etc. It is much thinner than gold foil. -- Gold lode (Mining), a gold vein. -- Gold mine, a place where gold is obtained by mining operations, as distinguished from diggings, where it is extracted by washing. Cf. Gold diggings (above). -- Gold nugget, a lump of gold as found in gold mining or digging; -- called also a pepito. -- Gold paint. See Gold shell. -- Gold or Golden, pheasant. (Zoöl.) See under Pheasant. -- Gold plate, a general name for vessels, dishes, cups, spoons, etc., made of gold. -- Gold of pleasure. [Name perhaps translated from Sp. oro-de-alegria.] (Bot.) A plant of the genus Camelina, bearing yellow flowers. C. sativa is sometimes cultivated for the oil of its seeds. -- Gold shell. (a) A composition of powdered gold or gold leaf, ground up with gum water and spread on shells, for artists' use; -- called also gold paint. (b) (Zoöl.) A bivalve shell (Anomia glabra) of the Atlantic coast; -- called also jingle shell and silver shell. See Anomia. -- Gold size, a composition used in applying gold leaf. -- Gold solder, a kind of solder, often containing twelve parts of gold, two of silver, and four of copper. -- Gold stick, the colonel of a regiment of English lifeguards, who attends his sovereign on state occasions; -- so called from the gilt rod presented to him by the sovereign when he receives his commission as colonel of the regiment. [Eng.] -- Gold thread. (a) A thread formed by twisting flatted gold over a thread of silk, with a wheel and iron bobbins; spun gold. Ure. (b) (Bot.) A small evergreen plant (Coptis trifolia), so called from its fibrous yellow roots. It is common in marshy places in the United States. -- Gold tissue, a tissue fabric interwoven with gold thread. -- Gold tooling, the fixing of gold leaf by a hot tool upon book covers, or the ornamental impression so made. -- Gold washings, places where gold found in gravel is separated from lighter material by washing. -- Gold worm, a glowworm. [Obs.] -- Jeweler's gold, an alloy containing three parts of gold to one of copper. -- Mosaic gold. See under Mosaic.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

30

295

24

327

34

293
Gold

GOLD, noun

1. A precious metal of a bright yellow color, and the most ductile and malleable of all the metals. It is the heaviest metal except platina; and being a very dense, fixed substance, and not liable to be injured by air, it is well fitted to be used as coin, or a representative of commodities in commerce. Its ductility and malleability render it the most suitable metal for gilding. It is often found native in solid masses, as in Hungary and Peru; though generally in combination with silver, copper or iron.

2. Money.

For me, the gold of France did not seduce--

3. Something pleasing or valuable; as a heart of gold

4. A bright yellow color; as a flower edged with gold

5. Riches; wealth.

GOLD of pleasure, a plant of the genus Myagrum.

GOLD, adjective Made of gold; consisting of gold; as a gold chain.

Why 1828?

0
2
 


Truer definitions, closer to Biblical

— Kathy (Fort Worth, TX)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

self-confident

SELF-CON'FIDENT, a. Confident of one's own strength or powers; relying on the correctness of one's own judgement, or the competence of one's own powers, without other aid.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

71

163

Compact Edition

60

25

CD-ROM

46

27

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.28 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top