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Wednesday - March 29, 2017

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [gloze]

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gloze

GLOZE, v.i. To flatter; to wheedle; to fawn; that is, to smooth, or to talk smoothly.

So glozed the tempter, and his proem tun'd.

A false glozing parasite.

GLOZE, n. Flattery; adulation.

1. Specious show; gloss. [Not used. See Gloss.]



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [gloze]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

GLOZE, v.i. To flatter; to wheedle; to fawn; that is, to smooth, or to talk smoothly.

So glozed the tempter, and his proem tun'd.

A false glozing parasite.

GLOZE, n. Flattery; adulation.

1. Specious show; gloss. [Not used. See Gloss.]

GLOZE, n.

  1. Flattery; adulation. Shak.
  2. Specious show; gloss. [Not used. See Gloss.] Sidney.

GLOZE, v.i. [Sax. glesan. See Gloss.]

To flatter; to wheedle to fawn; that is, to smooth, or to talk smoothly. So glozed the tempter, and his proem tun'd. Milton. A false glozing parasite. South.


Gloze
  1. To flatter] to wheedle; to fawn; to talk smoothly.

    Chaucer.

    A false, glozing parasite. South.

    So glozed the tempter, and his proem tuned. Milton.

  2. To smooth over; to palliate.

    By glozing the evil that is in the world. I. Taylor.

  3. Flattery; adulation; smooth speech.

    Now to plain dealing; lay these glozes by. Shak.

  4. To give a specious or false meaning; to ministerpret.

    Shak.
  5. Specious show; gloss.

    [Obs.] Sir P. Sidney.
1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Gloze

GLOZE, verb intransitive To flatter; to wheedle; to fawn; that is, to smooth, or to talk smoothly.

So glozed the tempter, and his proem tun'd.

A false glozing parasite.

GLOZE, noun Flattery; adulation.

1. Specious show; gloss. [Not used. See Gloss.]

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Word of the Day

such

SUCH, a.

1. Of that kind; of the like kind. We never saw such a day; we have never had such a time as the present.

It has as before the thing to which it relates. Give your children such precepts as tend to make them wiser and better.

It is to be noted that the definitive adjective a, never precedes such, but is placed between it and the noun to which it refers; as such a man; such an honor.

2. The same that. This was the state of the kingdom at such time as the enemy landed.

3. The same as what has been mentioned.

That thou art happy, owe to God;

That thou continu'st such, owe to thyself.

4. Referring to what has been specified. I have commanded my servant to be at such a place.

5. Such and such, is used in reference to a person or place of a certain kind.

The sovereign authority may enact a law, commanding such and such an action.

Random Word

cost

COST, n. [See the Verb.]

1. The price, value or equivalent of a thing purchased; the amount in value paid, charge or engaged to be paid for any thing bought or taken in barter. The word is equally applicable to the price in money or commodities; as the cost of a suit of clothes; the cost of a house or farm.

2. Expense; amount in value expended or to be expended; charge; that which is given or to be given for another thing.

I will not offer burnt offerings without cost. 1 Chronicles 21.

Have we eaten at all at the kings cost? 2 Samuel 19.

The cost of maintaining armies is immense and often ruinous.

3. In law, the sum fixed by law or allowed by the court for charges of a suit awarded against the party losing, in favor of the party prevailing, &c. The jury find that the plaintiff recover of the defendant ten dollars with costs of suit or with his cost.

4. Loss or expense of any kind; detriment; pain; suffering. The vicious man indulges his propensities at a great cost.

5. Sumptuousness; great expense.

COST, v.t. [The noun cost coincides in most of these languages with coast and L. Costa, a rib, the exterior part. The primary sense of the verb is, to throw or send out, to cast, as we say, to lay out. I call this a transitive verb. In the phrase, a hat costs six dollars, the sense is, it expends, lays out, or causes to be laid out six dollars.]

1. To require to be given or expend in barter or purchase; to be bought for; as, this book cost a dollar; the army and navy cost four millions a year.

2. To require to be laid out, given, bestowed or employed; as, Johnsons dictionary_webster1828 cost him seven years labor.

3. To require to be borne or suffered. Our sins cost us many pains. A sense of ingratitude to his maker costs the penitent sinner many pangs and sorrows.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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monte

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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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