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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [gird]

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gird

GIRD, n. gurd. [Eng. a yard.]

1. A twitch or pang; a sudden spasm, which resembles the stroke of a rod or the pressure of a band.

2. In popular language, a severe stroke of a stick or whip.

GIRD, v.t. gurd. pret. and pp. girded or girt.

1. To bind by surrounding with any flexible substance, as with a twig, a cord, bandage or cloth; as, to gird the loins with sackcloth.

2. To make fast by binding; to put on; usually with on; as, to gird on a harness; to gird on a sword.

3. To invest; to surround.

The Son appeared,

Girt with omnipotence.

4. To clothe; to dress; to habit.

I girded thee about with fine linen. Ezek. 16.

5. To furnish; to equip.

Girded with snaky wiles.

6. To surround; to encircle; to inclose; to encompass.

The Nyseian isle,

Girt with the river Triton.

7. To gibe; to reproach severly; to lash.

GIRD, v.i. To gibe; to sneer; to break a scornful jest; to utter severe sarcasms.

Men of all sorts take a pride to gird at me.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [gird]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

GIRD, n. gurd. [Eng. a yard.]

1. A twitch or pang; a sudden spasm, which resembles the stroke of a rod or the pressure of a band.

2. In popular language, a severe stroke of a stick or whip.

GIRD, v.t. gurd. pret. and pp. girded or girt.

1. To bind by surrounding with any flexible substance, as with a twig, a cord, bandage or cloth; as, to gird the loins with sackcloth.

2. To make fast by binding; to put on; usually with on; as, to gird on a harness; to gird on a sword.

3. To invest; to surround.

The Son appeared,

Girt with omnipotence.

4. To clothe; to dress; to habit.

I girded thee about with fine linen. Ezek. 16.

5. To furnish; to equip.

Girded with snaky wiles.

6. To surround; to encircle; to inclose; to encompass.

The Nyseian isle,

Girt with the river Triton.

7. To gibe; to reproach severly; to lash.

GIRD, v.i. To gibe; to sneer; to break a scornful jest; to utter severe sarcasms.

Men of all sorts take a pride to gird at me.

GIRD, n. [gurd; Sax. geard, or gyrd, or gyrda, a twig, branch, rod, pole, Eng. a yard; G. gurt, a girth, a girdle; Dan. gierde, a hedge, a rail. This word signifies primarily a twig, shoot or branch; hence a pole or stick, used in measuring. In measuring land, among our Saxon ancestors, the gyrd seems to have been a certain measure like our rod, perch or pole, all of which signify the same thing, a branch or shoot, a little pole. We now apply the word yard to a measure of three feet in length. In rude ages, gyrds, shoots of trees, were used for binding things together, whence the verb, to gird. See Withe. Gyrds were also used for driving, or for punishment, as we now use whips; and our common people use gird, for a severe stroke of a stick or whip. See Lye, under Gyrd and Weal-stylling.]

  1. A twitch or pang; a sudden spasm which resembles the stroke of a rod or the pressure of a band.
  2. In popular language, a severe stroke of a stick or whip.

GIRD, v.i.

To gibe; to sneer; to break a scornful jest; to utter severe sarcasms. Men of all sorts take a pride to gird at me. Shak.


GIRD, v.t. [gurd; pret. and pp. girded or girt. Sax. gyrdan; G. g├╝rten; D. gorden; Sw. giorda, to gird or surround; Dan. gierder, to hedge, to inclose. See the Noun. It is probable, that garden, Ir. gort, is from the same root; originally an inclosed field, a piece of ground surrounded with poles, stakes and branches of trees. If the noun is the primary word, the sense of the root is to shoot, as a branch; if the verb is the root, the sense is to surround, or rather to bind or make fast. The former is the most probable.]

  1. To bind by surrounding with any flexible substance, as with a twig, a cord, bandage or cloth; as, to gird the loins with sackcloth.
  2. To make fast by binding; to put on; usually with on; as, to gird on a harness; to gird on a sword.
  3. To invest; to surround. The Son appeared, / Girt with omnipotence. Milton.
  4. To clothe; to dress; to habit. I girded thee about with fine linen. Ezek. xvi.
  5. To furnish; to equip. Girded with snaky wiles. Milton.
  6. To surround; to encircle; to inclose; to encompass. The Nyseian isle, / Girt with the river Triton. Milton.
  7. To gibe; to reproach severely; to lash. Shak.

Gird
  1. A stroke with a rod or switch; a severe spasm; a twinge; a pang.

    Conscience . . . is freed from many fearful girds and twinges which the atheist feels. Tillotson.

  2. To strike; to smite.

    [Obs.]

    To slay him and to girden off his head. Chaucer.

  3. To gibe; to sneer; to break a scornful jest; to utter severe sarcasms.

    Men of all sorts take a pride to gird at me. Shak.

  4. To encircle or bind with any flexible band.
  5. A cut; a sarcastic remark; a gibe; a sneer.

    I thank thee for that gird, good Tranio. Shak.

  6. To sneer at; to mock; to gibe.

    Being moved, he will not spare to gird the gods. Shak.

  7. To make fast, as clothing, by binding with a cord, girdle, bandage, etc.
  8. To surround] to encircle, or encompass.

    That Nyseian isle,
    Girt with the River Triton.
    Milton.

  9. To clothe; to swathe; to invest.

    I girded thee about with fine linen. Ezek. xvi. 10.

    The Son . . . appeared
    Girt with omnipotence.
    Milton.

  10. To prepare; to make ready; to equip; as, to gird one's self for a contest.

    Thou hast girded me with strength. Ps. xviii. 39.

    To gird on, to put on; to fasten around or to one securely, like a girdle; as, to gird on armor or a sword.

    Let not him that girdeth on his harness boast himself as he that putteth it off. 1 Kings xx. 11.

    -- To gird up, to bind tightly with a girdle; to support and strengthen, as with a girdle.

    He girded up his loins, and ran before Ahab. 1 Kings xviii. 46.

    Gird up the loins of your mind. 1 Pet. i. 13.

    -- Girt up; prepared or equipped, as for a journey or for work, in allusion to the ancient custom of gathering the long flowing garments into the girdle and tightening it before any exertion; hence, adjectively, eagerly or constantly active; strenuous; striving. "A severer, more girt-up way of living." J. C. Shairp.

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Gird

GIRD, noun gurd. [Eng. a yard.]

1. A twitch or pang; a sudden spasm, which resembles the stroke of a rod or the pressure of a band.

2. In popular language, a severe stroke of a stick or whip.

GIRD, verb transitive gurd. preterit tense and participle passive girded or girt.

1. To bind by surrounding with any flexible substance, as with a twig, a cord, bandage or cloth; as, to gird the loins with sackcloth.

2. To make fast by binding; to put on; usually with on; as, to gird on a harness; to gird on a sword.

3. To invest; to surround.

The Son appeared,

Girt with omnipotence.

4. To clothe; to dress; to habit.

I girded thee about with fine linen. Ezekiel 16:10.

5. To furnish; to equip.

GIRDed with snaky wiles.

6. To surround; to encircle; to inclose; to encompass.

The Nyseian isle,

Girt with the river Triton.

7. To gibe; to reproach severly; to lash.

GIRD, verb intransitive To gibe; to sneer; to break a scornful jest; to utter severe sarcasms.

Men of all sorts take a pride to gird at me.

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because of it's biblical references

— Dan (Aurora, CO)

Word of the Day

immortal

IMMOR'TAL, a. [L. immortalis. See Mortal.]

1. Having no principle of alteration or corruption; exempt from death; having life or being that shall never end; as an immortal soul.

To the King eternal, immortal, invisible, the only wise God, be honor and glory forever. 1 Tim.1.

2. Never ending; everlasting; continual.

I have

Immortal longings in me.

3. Perpetual; having unlimited existence.

A corporation is called an immortal being.

4. Destined to live in all the ages of this world; imperishable; as immortal fame.

So Homer is called the immortal bard.

Random Word

federative

FED'ERATIVE, a. uniting; joining in a league; forming a confederacy.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

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