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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [gill]

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gill

GILL, n.

1. The organ of respiration in fishes, consisting of a cartilaginous or bony arch, attached to the bones of the head, and furnished on the exterior convex side with a multitude of fleshy leaves, or fringed vascular fibrils, resembling plumes, and of a red color in a healthy state. The water is admitted by the gill-opening, and acts upon the blood as it circulates in the fibrils. Other animals also breathe by gills, as frogs in their tadpole state, lobsters, &c.

Fishes perform respiration under water by the gills.

2. The flap that hangs below the beak of a fowl.

3. The flesh under the chin.

4. In England, a pair of wheels and a frame on which timber is conveyed. [Local.]



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [gill]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

GILL, n.

1. The organ of respiration in fishes, consisting of a cartilaginous or bony arch, attached to the bones of the head, and furnished on the exterior convex side with a multitude of fleshy leaves, or fringed vascular fibrils, resembling plumes, and of a red color in a healthy state. The water is admitted by the gill-opening, and acts upon the blood as it circulates in the fibrils. Other animals also breathe by gills, as frogs in their tadpole state, lobsters, &c.

Fishes perform respiration under water by the gills.

2. The flap that hangs below the beak of a fowl.

3. The flesh under the chin.

4. In England, a pair of wheels and a frame on which timber is conveyed. [Local.]

GILL, n.1 [Sw. gel; Sp. agalla, a gland in the throat; a gall-nut, a wind-gall on a horse, the beak of a shuttle, and the gill of a fish; Port. guelra or guerra. Hence it would seem that gill is a shoot or prominence, the fringe-like substance, not the aperture. In Danish, gilder signifies to geld, and to cut off the gills of herrings, and in Scot. gil or gul is a crack or fissure.]

  1. The organ of respiration in fishes, consisting of a cartilaginous or bony arch, attached to the bones of the head, and furnished on the exterior convex side with a multitude of fleshy leaves, or fringed vascular fibrils, resembling plumes, and of a red color in a healthy state. The water as admitted by the gill-opening, and acts upon the blood as it circulates in the fibrils. Other animals also breathe by gills, as frogs in their tadpole state, lobsters, &c. Ed. Encyc. Fishes perform respiration under water by the gills. Ray.
  2. The flap that hangs below the beak of a fowl. Bacon.
  3. The flesh under the chin. Bacon. Swift.
  4. In England, a pair of wheels and a frame on which timber is conveyed. [Local.]

GILL, n.2 [Low L. gilla, gillo or gello, a drinking glass, a gill. This word has the same elementary letters as Gr. γαυλος, a pail or bucket, and Eng. gallon, probably from one of the roots in Gl, which signify to hold or contain.]

  1. A measure of capacity, containing the fourth part of a pint. It is said to be in some places in England, half a pint. Encyc.
  2. A measure among miners, equal to a pint. Carew.

GILL, n.3

  1. A plant, ground-ivy, of the genus Glechoma. Fam. of Plants.
  2. Malt liquor medicated with ground-ivy.

GILL, n.4 [In Sw. gilja signifies to woo.]

  1. In ludicrous language, a female; a wanton girl. Each Jack with his Gill. B. Jonson.
  2. A fissure in a hill; also, a place between steep banks and a rivulet flowing through it; a brook. Ray. Grose.

Gill
  1. An organ for aquatic respiration; a branchia.

    Fishes perform respiration under water by the gills. Ray.

    * Gills are usually lamellar or filamentous appendages, through which the blood circulates, and in which it is exposed to the action of the air contained in the water. In vertebrates they are appendages of the visceral arches on either side of the neck. In invertebrates they occupy various situations.

  2. A two-wheeled frame for transporting timber.

    [Prov. Eng.]
  3. A leech.

    [Also gell.] [Scot.] Jameison.
  4. A woody glen; a narrow valley containing a stream.

    [Prov. Eng. *** Scot.]
  5. A measure of capacity, containing one fourth of a pint.
  6. A young woman] a sweetheart; a flirting or wanton girl.

    "Each Jack with his Gill." B. Jonson.
  7. The radiating, gill-shaped plates forming the under surface of a mushroom.
  8. The ground ivy (Nepeta Glechoma); -- called also gill over the ground, and other like names.
  9. The fleshy flap that hangs below the beak of a fowl; a wattle.
  10. Malt liquor medicated with ground ivy.

    Gill ale. (a) Ale flavored with ground ivy. (b) (Bot.) Alehoof.

  11. The flesh under or about the chin.

    Swift.
  12. One of the combs of closely ranged steel pins which divide the ribbons of flax fiber or wool into fewer parallel filaments.

    [Prob. so called from F. aiguilles, needles. Ure.]

    Gill arches, Gill bars. (Anat.) Same as Branchial arches. -- Gill clefts. (Anat.) Same as Branchial clefts. See under Branchial. -- Gill cover, Gill lid. See Operculum. -- Gill frame, or Gill head (Flax Manuf.), a spreader; a machine for subjecting flax to the action of gills. Knight. -- Gill net, a flat net so suspended in the water that its meshes allow the heads of fish to pass, but catch in the gills when they seek to extricate themselves. -- Gill opening, or Gill slit (Anat.), an opening behind and below the head of most fishes, and some amphibians, by which the water from the gills is discharged. In most fishes there is a single opening on each side, but in the sharks and rays there are five, or more, on each side. -- Gill rakes, or Gill rakers (Anat.), horny filaments, or progresses, on the inside of the branchial arches of fishes, which help to prevent solid substances from being carried into gill cavities.

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Gill

GILL, noun

1. The organ of respiration in fishes, consisting of a cartilaginous or bony arch, attached to the bones of the head, and furnished on the exterior convex side with a multitude of fleshy leaves, or fringed vascular fibrils, resembling plumes, and of a red color in a healthy state. The water is admitted by the gill-opening, and acts upon the blood as it circulates in the fibrils. Other animals also breathe by gills, as frogs in their tadpole state, lobsters, etc.

Fishes perform respiration under water by the gills.

2. The flap that hangs below the beak of a fowl.

3. The flesh under the chin.

4. In England, a pair of wheels and a frame on which timber is conveyed. [Local.]

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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spindle-legs

SPIN'DLE-LEGS, SPIN'DLE-SHANKS, n. A tall slender person; in contempt.

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