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Wednesday - July 26, 2017

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [gather]

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gather

GATH'ER, v.t.

1. To bring together; to collect a number of separate things into one place or into one aggregate body.

Gather stones; and they took stones,and made a heap. Gen.31.

2. To get in harvest; to reap or cut and bring into barns or stores. Levit. 25.20.

3. To pick up; to glean; to get in small parcels and bring together.

Gather out the stones. Is.62.

He must gather up money by degrees.

4. To pluck; to collect by cropping, picking or plucking.

Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles? Matt.7.

5. To assemble; to congregate; to bring persons into one place. Ezek. 22.19.

6. To collect in abundance; to accumulate; to amass.

I gathered me also silver and gold, and the peculiar treasure of kings. Eccles.2.

7. To select and take; to separate from others and bring together.

Save us, O Lord our God, and gather us from among the heathen. Ps.106.

8. To sweep together.

The kingdom of heaven is like a net that was cast into the sea, and gathered of every kind. Matt.13.

9. To bring into one body or interest.

Yet will I gather others to him. Is.56.

10. To draw together from a state of expansion or diffusion; to contract.

Gathering his flowing robe he seemed to stand,

In act to speak, and graceful stretch'd his hand.

11. To gain.

He gathers ground upon her in the chase.

12. To pucker; to plait.

13. To deduce by inference; to collect or learn by reasoning. From what I hear I gather that he was present.

After he had seen the vision, immediately we endeavored to go into Macedonia, assuredly gathering that the Lord had called us to preach the gospel to them. Acts.16.

14. To coil as a serpent.

To gather breath, to have respite.

GATH'ER, v.i. To collect; to unite; to increase; to be condensed. The clouds gather in the west.

1. To increase; to grow larger by accretion of like matter.

Their snow ball did not gather as it went.

2. To assemble. The people gather fast.

3. To generate pus or matter. [See Gathering.]



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [gather]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

GATH'ER, v.t.

1. To bring together; to collect a number of separate things into one place or into one aggregate body.

Gather stones; and they took stones,and made a heap. Gen.31.

2. To get in harvest; to reap or cut and bring into barns or stores. Levit. 25.20.

3. To pick up; to glean; to get in small parcels and bring together.

Gather out the stones. Is.62.

He must gather up money by degrees.

4. To pluck; to collect by cropping, picking or plucking.

Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles? Matt.7.

5. To assemble; to congregate; to bring persons into one place. Ezek. 22.19.

6. To collect in abundance; to accumulate; to amass.

I gathered me also silver and gold, and the peculiar treasure of kings. Eccles.2.

7. To select and take; to separate from others and bring together.

Save us, O Lord our God, and gather us from among the heathen. Ps.106.

8. To sweep together.

The kingdom of heaven is like a net that was cast into the sea, and gathered of every kind. Matt.13.

9. To bring into one body or interest.

Yet will I gather others to him. Is.56.

10. To draw together from a state of expansion or diffusion; to contract.

Gathering his flowing robe he seemed to stand,

In act to speak, and graceful stretch'd his hand.

11. To gain.

He gathers ground upon her in the chase.

12. To pucker; to plait.

13. To deduce by inference; to collect or learn by reasoning. From what I hear I gather that he was present.

After he had seen the vision, immediately we endeavored to go into Macedonia, assuredly gathering that the Lord had called us to preach the gospel to them. Acts.16.

14. To coil as a serpent.

To gather breath, to have respite.

GATH'ER, v.i. To collect; to unite; to increase; to be condensed. The clouds gather in the west.

1. To increase; to grow larger by accretion of like matter.

Their snow ball did not gather as it went.

2. To assemble. The people gather fast.

3. To generate pus or matter. [See Gathering.]

GATH'ER, n.

A plait or fold in cloth, made by drawing.


GATH'ER, v.i.

  1. To collect; to unite; to increase; to be condensed. The clouds gather in the west.
  2. To increase; to grow larger by accretion of like matter. Their snow-ball did not gather as it went Bacon.
  3. To assemble. The people gather fast.
  4. To generate pus or matter. [See Gathering.]

GATH'ER, v.t. [Sax. gaderian, or gatherian; D. gaderen. I know not whether the first syllable is a prefix or not. The Ch. גדר signifies to inclose, and to gather dates. If the elements are primarily Gd, the word coincides with Ger. gattern, Ch. אגד, to gather, to bind.]

  1. To bring together; to collect a number of separate things into one place or into one aggregate body. Gather stones: and they took stones, and made a heap. Gen. xxxi.
  2. To get in harvest: to reap or cut and bring into barns or stores. Levit. xxv. 20.
  3. To pick up; to glean; to get in small parcels and bring together. Gather out the stones. Is. lxii. He must gather up money by degrees. Locke.
  4. To pluck; to collect by cropping, picking, or plucking. Do men gather grapes from thorns, or figs from thistles? Matth. vii.
  5. To assemble; to congregate; to bring persons into one place. Ezek. xxii. 19.
  6. To collect in abundance; to accumulate; to amass. I gathered me also silver and gold, and the peculiar treasure of kings. Eccles. ii.
  7. To select and take; to separate from others and bring together. Save us, O Lord our God, and gather us from among the heathen. Ps. cvi.
  8. To sweep together. The kingdom of heaven is like a net that was cast into the sea, and gathered of every kind. Matth. xiii.
  9. To bring into one body or interest. Yet will I gather others to him. Is. lvi.
  10. To draw together from a state of expansion or diffusion; to contract. Gathering his flowing robe he seemed to stand, / In act to speak, and graceful stretch'd his hand. Pope.
  11. To gain. He gathers ground upon her in the chase. Dryden.
  12. To pucker; to plait.
  13. To deduce by inference; to collect or learn by reasoning. From what I hear I gather that he was present. After he had seen the vision, immediately we endeavored to go into Macedonia, assuredly gathering that the Lord had called us to preach the Gospel to them. Acts xvi.
  14. To coil as a serpent. To gather breath, to have respite. [Obs.] Spenser.

Gath"er
  1. To bring together; to collect, as a number of separate things, into one place, or into one aggregate body; to assemble; to muster; to congregate.

    And Belgium's capital had gathered them
    Her beauty and her chivalry.
    Byron.

    When he had gathered all the chief priests and scribes of the people together. Matt. ii. 4.

  2. To come together; to collect; to unite; to become assembled; to congregate.

    When small humors gather to a gout. Pope.

    Tears from the depth of some divine despair
    Rise in the heart, and gather to the eyes.
    Tennyson.

  3. A plait or fold in cloth, made by drawing a thread through it; a pucker.
  4. To pick out and bring together from among what is of less value; to collect, as a harvest; to harvest; to cull; to pick off; to pluck.

    A rose just gathered from the stalk. Dryden.

    Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles? Matt. vii. 16.

    Gather us from among the heathen. Ps. cvi. 47.

  5. To grow larger by accretion; to increase.

    Their snowball did not gather as it went. Bacon.

  6. The inclination forward of the axle journals to keep the wheels from working outward.
  7. To accumulate by collecting and saving little by little; to amass; to gain; to heap up.

    He that by usury and unjust gain increaseth his substance, he shall gather it for him that will pity the poor. Prov. xxviii. 8.

    To pay the creditor . . . he must gather up money by degrees. Locke.

  8. To concentrate; to come to a head, as a sore, and generate pus; as, a boil has gathered.
  9. The soffit or under surface of the masonry required in gathering. See Gather, v. t., 7.
  10. To bring closely together the parts or particles of; to contract; to compress; to bring together in folds or plaits, as a garment; also, to draw together, as a piece of cloth by a thread; to pucker; to plait; as, to gather a ruffle.

    Gathering his flowing robe, he seemed to stand
    In act to speak, and graceful stretched his hand.
    Pope.

  11. To collect or bring things together.

    Thou knewest that I reap where I sowed not, and gather where I have not strewed. Matt. xxv. 26.

  12. To derive, or deduce, as an inference; to collect, as a conclusion, from circumstances that suggest, or arguments that prove; to infer; to conclude.

    Let me say no more!
    Gather the sequel by that went before.
    Shak.

  13. To gain; to win.

    [Obs.]

    He gathers ground upon her in the chase. Dryden.

  14. To bring together, or nearer together, in masonry, as where the width of a fireplace is rapidly diminished to the width of the flue, or the like.
  15. To haul in; to take up; as, to gather the slack of a rope.

    To be gathered to one's people, or to one's fathers to die. Gen. xxv. 8. -- To gather breath, to recover normal breathing after being out of breath; to get breath; to rest. Spenser. -- To gather one's self together, to collect and dispose one's powers for a great effort, as a beast crouches preparatory to a leap. -- To gather way (Naut.), to begin to move; to move with increasing speed.

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Gather

GATH'ER, verb transitive

1. To bring together; to collect a number of separate things into one place or into one aggregate body.

Gather stones; and they took stones, and made a heap. Genesis 31:46.

2. To get in harvest; to reap or cut and bring into barns or stores. Leviticus 25:20.

3. To pick up; to glean; to get in small parcels and bring together.

Gather out the stones. Isaiah 62:10.

He must gather up money by degrees.

4. To pluck; to collect by cropping, picking or plucking.

Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles? Matthew 7:16.

5. To assemble; to congregate; to bring persons into one place. Ezekiel 22:19.

6. To collect in abundance; to accumulate; to amass.

I gathered me also silver and gold, and the peculiar treasure of kings. Ecclesiastes 2:26.

7. To select and take; to separate from others and bring together.

Save us, O Lord our God, and gather us from among the heathen. Psalms 106:47.

8. To sweep together.

The kingdom of heaven is like a net that was cast into the sea, and gathered of every kind. Matthew 13:28.

9. To bring into one body or interest.

Yet will I gather others to him. Isaiah 56:8.

10. To draw together from a state of expansion or diffusion; to contract.

Gathering his flowing robe he seemed to stand,

In act to speak, and graceful stretch'd his hand.

11. To gain.

He gathers ground upon her in the chase.

12. To pucker; to plait.

13. To deduce by inference; to collect or learn by reasoning. From what I hear I gather that he was present.

After he had seen the vision, immediately we endeavored to go into Macedonia, assuredly gathering that the Lord had called us to preach the gospel to them. Acts 16:1.

14. To coil as a serpent.

To gather breath, to have respite.

GATH'ER, verb intransitive To collect; to unite; to increase; to be condensed. The clouds gather in the west.

1. To increase; to grow larger by accretion of like matter.

Their snow ball did not gather as it went.

2. To assemble. The people gather fast.

3. To generate pus or matter. [See Gathering.]

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importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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