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Friday - August 18, 2017

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [garden]

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garden

G`ARDEN, n. [Eng. yard, an inclosed place; L. hortus.]

1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of herbs, or plants, fruits and flowers; usually near a mansion-house. Land appropriated to the raising of culinary herbs and roots for domestic use, is called a kitchen-garden; that appropriated to flowers and shrubs is called a flower garden; and that to fruits, is called a fruit garden. But these uses are sometimes blended.

2. A rich, well cultivated spot or tract of country; a delightful spot. The intervals on the river Connecticut are all a garden. Lombardy is the garden of Italy.

Garden, in composition, is used adjectively, as garden-mold, a rich fine mold or soil; garden-tillage,the tillage used in cultivating gardens.

G`ARDEN, v.i. To layout and to cultivate a garden; to prepare ground to plant and till it, for the purpose of producing plants, shrubs, flowers and fruits.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [garden]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

G`ARDEN, n. [Eng. yard, an inclosed place; L. hortus.]

1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of herbs, or plants, fruits and flowers; usually near a mansion-house. Land appropriated to the raising of culinary herbs and roots for domestic use, is called a kitchen-garden; that appropriated to flowers and shrubs is called a flower garden; and that to fruits, is called a fruit garden. But these uses are sometimes blended.

2. A rich, well cultivated spot or tract of country; a delightful spot. The intervals on the river Connecticut are all a garden. Lombardy is the garden of Italy.

Garden, in composition, is used adjectively, as garden-mold, a rich fine mold or soil; garden-tillage,the tillage used in cultivating gardens.

G`ARDEN, v.i. To layout and to cultivate a garden; to prepare ground to plant and till it, for the purpose of producing plants, shrubs, flowers and fruits.


GAR'DEN, n. [G. garten; W. garth; It. giardino; Sp. jardin; Fr. id.; Port. jardim; Arm. jardd, jardin, or gardd. The first syllable is the Sax. geard, Goth. gards, Eng. yard, an inclosed place. The Saxon is ortgeard, Dan. urtegaard, Sw. örtegård, wortyard, an inclosure for herbs. The Irish is gairdin or garrdha; Hungarian, korth; L. hortus. In Slavonic, gard, Russ. gorod, signifies a town or city, and the derivative verb goroju, to inclose with a hedge. Hence Stuttgard, Novogrod or Novogardia. The primary sense of garden is an inclosed place, and inclosures were originally made with hedges, stakes or palisades. It is probable that in the East, and in the pastoral state, men had little or no inclosed land except such as was fenced for the protection of herbs and fruits, and for villages. See Coxe's Russ. B. 4.]

  1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of herbs or plants, fruits and flowers; usually near a mansion-house. Land appropriated to the raising of culinary herbs and roots for domestic use, is called a kitchen-garden; that appropriated to flowers and shrubs, is called a flower-garden and that to fruits, is called a fruit-garden. But these uses are sometimes blended.
  2. A rich, well cultivated spot or tract of country; a delightful spot. The intervals on the river Connecticut are all a garden. Lombardy is the garden of Italy. Garden, in composition, is used adjectively, as garden-mold, a rich fine mold or soil; garden-tillage, the tillage used in cultivating gardens.

GAR'DEN, v.i.

To lay out or to cultivate a garden; to prepare ground, to plant and till it, for the purpose of producing plants, shrubs, flowers and fruits.


Gar"den
  1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  2. To lay out or cultivate a garden] to labor in a garden; to practice horticulture.
  3. To cultivate as a garden.
  4. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.

    I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy,
    The pleasant garden of great Italy.
    Shak.

    * Garden is often used adjectively or in self- explaining compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.

    Garden balsam, an ornamental plant (Impatiens Balsamina). -- Garden engine, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering gardens. -- Garden glass. (a) A bell glass for covering plants. (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal, to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an ornament in gardens in Germany. -- Garden house (a) A summer house. Beau. *** Fl. (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.] -- Garden husbandry, the raising on a small scale of seeds, fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale. -- Garden mold or mould, rich, mellow earth which is fit for a garden. Mortimer. -- Garden nail, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick walls. Knight. -- Garden net, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc., to protect them from birds. -- Garden party, a social party held out of doors, within the grounds or garden attached to a private residence. -- Garden plot, a plot appropriated to a garden. Garden pot, a watering pot. -- Garden pump, a garden engine] a barrow pump. -- Garden shears, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges, pruning, etc. - - Garden spider, (Zoöl.), the diadem spider (Epeira diadema), common in gardens, both in Europe and America. It spins a geometrical web. See Geometric spider, and Spider web. -- Garden stand, a stand for flower pots. -- Garden stuff, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.] -- Garden syringe, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling them with solutions for destroying insects, etc. -- Garden truck, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.] -- Garden ware, garden truck. [Obs.] Mortimer. -- Bear garden, Botanic garden, etc. See under Bear, etc. -- Hanging garden. See under Hanging. -- Kitchen garden, a garden where vegetables are cultivated for household use. -- Market garden, a piece of ground where vegetable are cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

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Garden

G'ARDEN, noun [Eng. yard, an inclosed place; Latin hortus.]

1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of herbs, or plants, fruits and flowers; usually near a mansion-house. Land appropriated to the raising of culinary herbs and roots for domestic use, is called a kitchen-garden; that appropriated to flowers and shrubs is called a flower garden; and that to fruits, is called a fruit garden But these uses are sometimes blended.

2. A rich, well cultivated spot or tract of country; a delightful spot. The intervals on the river Connecticut are all a garden Lombardy is the garden of Italy.

Garden, in composition, is used adjectively, as garden-mold, a rich fine mold or soil; garden-tillage, the tillage used in cultivating gardens.

G'ARDEN, verb intransitive To layout and to cultivate a garden; to prepare ground to plant and till it, for the purpose of producing plants, shrubs, flowers and fruits.

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Meanings of the words as I study the Bible

— Cindy (Fort Smith, AR)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

seventieth

SEV'ENTIETH, a. [from seventy.] The ordinal of seventy; as a man in the seventieth year of his age. The seventieth year begins immediately after the close of the sixth-ninth.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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