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Monday - August 21, 2017

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [game]

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game

GAME, n.

1. Sport of any kind.

2. Jest; opposed to earnest; as, betwixt earnest and game. [Not used.]

3. An exercise or play for amusement or winning a stake; as a game of cricket; a game of chess; a game of whist. Some games depend on skill; others on hazard.

4. A single match at play.

5. Advantage in play; as, to play the game into another's hand.

6. Scheme pursued; measures planned.

This seems to be the present game of that crown.

7. Field sports; the chase, falconry, &c.

8. Animals pursued or taken in the chase, or in the sports of the field; animals appropriated in England to legal sportsmen; as deer, hares, &c.

9. In antiquity, games were public diversions or contests exhibited as spectacles for the gratification of the people. These games consisted of running, leaping, wrestling, riding, &c. Such were the Olympic games, the Pythian, the Isthmian, the Nemean, &c, among the Greeks; and among the Romans, the Apollinarian, the Circensian, the Capitoline, &c.

10. Mockery; sport; derision; as, to make game of a person.

GAME, v.i. To play at any sport or diversion.

1. To play for a stake or prize; to use cards, dice, billiards or other instruments, according to certain rules, with a view to win money or other thing waged upon the issue of the contest.

2. To practice gaming.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [game]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

GAME, n.

1. Sport of any kind.

2. Jest; opposed to earnest; as, betwixt earnest and game. [Not used.]

3. An exercise or play for amusement or winning a stake; as a game of cricket; a game of chess; a game of whist. Some games depend on skill; others on hazard.

4. A single match at play.

5. Advantage in play; as, to play the game into another's hand.

6. Scheme pursued; measures planned.

This seems to be the present game of that crown.

7. Field sports; the chase, falconry, &c.

8. Animals pursued or taken in the chase, or in the sports of the field; animals appropriated in England to legal sportsmen; as deer, hares, &c.

9. In antiquity, games were public diversions or contests exhibited as spectacles for the gratification of the people. These games consisted of running, leaping, wrestling, riding, &c. Such were the Olympic games, the Pythian, the Isthmian, the Nemean, &c, among the Greeks; and among the Romans, the Apollinarian, the Circensian, the Capitoline, &c.

10. Mockery; sport; derision; as, to make game of a person.

GAME, v.i. To play at any sport or diversion.

1. To play for a stake or prize; to use cards, dice, billiards or other instruments, according to certain rules, with a view to win money or other thing waged upon the issue of the contest.

2. To practice gaming.

GAME, n. [Ice. gaman; Sax. gamen, a jest, sport; gamian, to jest, to sport; It. giambare, to jest or jeer; W. camp, a feat, a game; campiaw, to contend in games. The latter seems to unite game with camp, which in Saxon and other northern dialects signifies a combat.]

  1. Sport of any kind. Shak.
  2. Jest; opposed to earnest; as, betwixt earnest and game. [Not used.] Spenser.
  3. An exercise or play for amusement or winning a stake; as, a game of cricket; a game of chess; a game of whist. Some games depend on skill, others on hazard.
  4. A single match at play. Addison.
  5. Advantage in play; an, to play the game into another's hand.
  6. Scheme pursued; measures planned. This seems to be the present game of that crown. Temple.
  7. Field sports; the chase; falconry, &c. Shak. Waller.
  8. Animals pursued or taken in the chase, or in the sports of the field; animals appropriated in England to legal sportsmen; as deer, hares, &c.
  9. In antiquity, games were public diversions or contests exhibited as spectacles for the gratification of the people. These games consisted of running, leaping, wrestling, riding, &c. Such were the Olympic games, the Pythian, the Isthmian, the Nemean, &c. among the Greeks; and among the Romans, the Apollinarian, the Circensian, the Capitoline, &c. Encyc.
  10. Mockery; sport; derision; as, to make game of a person.

GAME, v.i. [Sax. gamian.]

  1. To play at any sport or diversion.
  2. To play for a stake or prize; to use cards, dice, billiards or other instruments, according to certain rules, with a view to win money or other thing waged upon the issue of the contest.
  3. To practice gaming.

Game
  1. Crooked] lame; as, a game leg.

    [Colloq.]
  2. Sport of any kind] jest, frolic.

    We have had pastimes here, and pleasant game. Shak.

  3. Having a resolute, unyielding spirit, like the gamecock; ready to fight to the last; plucky.

    I was game . . . .I felt that I could have fought even to the death. W. Irving.

  4. To rejoice; to be pleased; -- often used, in Old English, impersonally with dative.

    [Obs.]

    God loved he best with all his whole hearte
    At alle times, though him gamed or smarte.
    Chaucer.

  5. A contest, physical or mental, according to certain rules, for amusement, recreation, or for winning a stake; as, a game of chance; games of skill; field games, etc.

    But war's a game, which, were their subject wise,
    Kings would not play at.
    Cowper.

    * Among the ancients, especially the Greeks and Romans, there were regularly recurring public exhibitions of strength, agility, and skill under the patronage of the government, usually accompanied with religious ceremonies. Such were the Olympic, the Pythian, the Nemean, and the Isthmian games.

  6. Of or pertaining to such animals as are hunted for game, or to the act or practice of hunting.

    Game bag, a sportsman's bag for carrying small game captured; also, the whole quantity of game taken. -- Game bird, any bird commonly shot for food, esp. grouse, partridges, quails, pheasants, wild turkeys, and the shore or wading birds, such as plovers, snipe, woodcock, curlew, and sandpipers. The term is sometimes arbitrarily restricted to birds hunted by sportsmen, with dogs and guns. -- Game egg, an egg producing a gamecock. -- Game laws, laws regulating the seasons and manner of taking game for food or for sport. -- Game preserver, a land owner who regulates the killing of game on his estate with a view to its increase. [Eng.] -- To be game. (a) To show a brave, unyielding spirit. (b) To be victor in a game. [Colloq.] -- To die game, to maintain a bold, unyielding spirit to the last; to die fighting.

  7. To play at any sport or diversion.
  8. The use or practice of such a game; a single match at play; a single contest; as, a game at cards.

    Talk the game o'er between the deal. Lloyd.

  9. To play for a stake or prize; to use cards, dice, billiards, or other instruments, according to certain rules, with a view to win money or other thing waged upon the issue of the contest; to gamble.
  10. That which is gained, as the stake in a game; also, the number of points necessary to be scored in order to win a game; as, in short whist five points are game.
  11. In some games, a point credited on the score to the player whose cards counts up the highest.
  12. A scheme or art employed in the pursuit of an object or purpose; method of procedure; projected line of operations; plan; project.

    Your murderous game is nearly up. Blackw. Mag.

    It was obviously Lord Macaulay's game to blacken the greatest literary champion of the cause he had set himself to attack. Saintsbury.

  13. Animals pursued and taken by sportsmen; wild meats designed for, or served at, table.

    Those species of animals . . . distinguished from the rest by the well-known appellation of game. Blackstone.

    Confidence game. See under Confidence. -- To make game of, to make sport of; to mock. Milton.

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Game

GAME, noun

1. Sport of any kind.

2. Jest; opposed to earnest; as, betwixt earnest and game [Not used.]

3. An exercise or play for amusement or winning a stake; as a game of cricket; a game of chess; a game of whist. Some games depend on skill; others on hazard.

4. A single match at play.

5. Advantage in play; as, to play the game into another's hand.

6. Scheme pursued; measures planned.

This seems to be the present game of that crown.

7. Field sports; the chase, falconry, etc.

8. Animals pursued or taken in the chase, or in the sports of the field; animals appropriated in England to legal sportsmen; as deer, hares, etc.

9. In antiquity, games were public diversions or contests exhibited as spectacles for the gratification of the people. These games consisted of running, leaping, wrestling, riding, etc. Such were the Olympic games, the Pythian, the Isthmian, the Nemean, etc., among the Greeks; and among the Romans, the Apollinarian, the Circensian, the Capitoline, etc.

10. Mockery; sport; derision; as, to make game of a person.

GAME, verb intransitive To play at any sport or diversion.

1. To play for a stake or prize; to use cards, dice, billiards or other instruments, according to certain rules, with a view to win money or other thing waged upon the issue of the contest.

2. To practice gaming.

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Truer definitions, closer to Biblical

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

hardy

H`ARDY, a.

1. Bold; brave; stout; daring; resolute; intrepid.

Who is hardy enough to encounter contempt?

2. Strong; firm; compact.

An unwholesome blast may shake in pieces his hardy fabric.

3. Confident; full of assurance; impudent; stubborn to excess.

4. Inured to fatigue; rendered firm by exercise, as a veteran soldier.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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