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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [gall]

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gall

GALL, n. [Gr. probably from its color.]

1. In the animal economy, the bile, a bitter, a yellowish green fluid, secreted in the glandular substance of the liver. It is glutinous or imperfectly fluid, like oil.

2. Any thing extremely bitter.

3. Rancor; malignity.

4. Anger; bitterness of mind.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [gall]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

GALL, n. [Gr. probably from its color.]

1. In the animal economy, the bile, a bitter, a yellowish green fluid, secreted in the glandular substance of the liver. It is glutinous or imperfectly fluid, like oil.

2. Any thing extremely bitter.

3. Rancor; malignity.

4. Anger; bitterness of mind.

GALL, n.1 [Sax. gealla; G. galle; D. gal; Dan. galde; Sw. galle; Gr. χολη; probably from its color, Sax. gealew, yelfow. See Yellow and Gold.]

  1. In the animal economy, the bile, a bitter, yellowish green fluid, secreted in the glandular substance of the liver. It is glutinous or imperfectly fluid, like oil. – Encyc. Nicholson.
  2. Any thing extremely bitter. – Dryden.
  3. Rancor; malignity. – Spenser.
  4. Anger; bitterness of mind. – Prior.

GALL, n.2 [L. galla; Sax. gealla; Sp. agalla; It. galla.]

A hard round excrescence on the oak tree in certain warm climates, said to be the nest of an insect called cynips. It is formed from the tear issuing from a puncture made by the insect, and gradually increased by accessions of fresh matter, till it forms a covering to the eggs and succeeding insects. Galls are used in making ink; the best are from Aleppo. – Parr.


GALL, n.3

A wound in the skin by rubbing.


GALL, v.i.

To fret; to be teased. – Shak.


GALL, v.t.1 [Fr. galer, to scratch or rub; gale, scab.]

  1. To fret and wear away by friction; to excoriate; to hurt or break the skin by rubbing; as, a saddle galls the back of a horse, or a collar his breast. Tyrant, I well deserve thy galling chain. – Pope.
  2. To impair; to wear away; as, a stream galls the ground. – Ray.
  3. To tease; to fret; to vex; to chagrin; as, to be galled by sarcasm.
  4. To wound; to break the surface of any thing by rubbing; as, to gall a mast or a cable.
  5. To injure; to harass; to annoy. The troops were galled by the shot of the enemy. In our wars against the French of old, we used to gall them with our long bows, at a greater distance than they could shoot their arrows. – Addison.

GALL, v.t.2

In dyeing, to impregnate with a decoration of gall-nuts. Ure.


Gall
  1. The bitter, alkaline, viscid fluid found in the gall bladder, beneath the liver. It consists of the secretion of the liver, or bile, mixed with that of the mucous membrane of the gall bladder.
  2. An excrescence of any form produced on any part of a plant by insects or their larvae. They are most commonly caused by small Hymenoptera and Diptera which puncture the bark and lay their eggs in the wounds. The larvae live within the galls. Some galls are due to aphids, mites, etc. See Gallnut.

    * The galls, or gallnuts, of commerce are produced by insects of the genus Cynips, chiefly on an oak (Quercus infectoria or Lusitanica) of Western Asia and Southern Europe. They contain much tannin, and are used in the manufacture of that article and for making ink and a black dye, as well as in medicine.

    Gall insect (Zoöl.), any insect that produces galls. -- Gall midge (Zoöl.), any small dipterous insect that produces galls. -- Gall oak, the oak (Quercus infectoria) which yields the galls of commerce. -- Gall of glass, the neutral salt skimmed off from the surface of melted crown glass; -- called also glass gall and sandiver. Ure. -- Gall wasp. (Zoöl.) See Gallfly.

  3. To impregnate with a decoction of gallnuts.

    Ure.
  4. To fret and wear away by friction; to hurt or break the skin of by rubbing; to chafe; to injure the surface of by attrition; as, a saddle galls the back of a horse; to gall a mast or a cable.

    I am loth to gall a new-healed wound. Shak.

  5. To scoff; to jeer.

    [R.] Shak.
  6. A wound in the skin made by rubbing.
  7. The gall bladder.
  8. To fret; to vex; as, to be galled by sarcasm.

    They that are most galled with my folly,
    They most must laugh.
    Shak.

  9. Anything extremely bitter; bitterness; rancor.

    He hath . . . compassed me with gall and travail. Lam. iii. 5.

    Comedy diverted without gall. Dryden.

  10. To injure; to harass; to annoy; as, the troops were galled by the shot of the enemy.

    In our wars against the French of old, we used to gall them with our longbows, at a greater distance than they could shoot their arrows. Addison.

  11. Impudence; brazen assurance.

    [Slang]

    Gall bladder (Anat.), the membranous sac, in which the bile, or gall, is stored up, as secreted by the liver; the cholecystis. See Illust. of Digestive apparatus. -- Gall duct, a duct which conveys bile, as the cystic duct, or the hepatic duct. -- Gall sickness, a remitting bilious fever in the Netherlands. Dunglison. -- Gall of the earth (Bot.), an herbaceous composite plant with variously lobed and cleft leaves, usually the Prenanthes serpentaria.

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Gall

GALL, noun [Gr. probably from its color.]

1. In the animal economy, the bile, a bitter, a yellowish green fluid, secreted in the glandular substance of the liver. It is glutinous or imperfectly fluid, like oil.

2. Any thing extremely bitter.

3. Rancor; malignity.

4. Anger; bitterness of mind.

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The TRUTH is ultimate to leading a moment by moment intimate relationship with, our Lord, Jesus Christ who created Noah to deliver Truth of Words to this one nation under God.

— James (California City, CA)

Word of the Day

duly

DULY, adv. [from due.]

1. Properly; fitly; in a suitable or becoming manner; as, let the subject be duly considered.

2. Regularly; at the proper time; as, a man duly attended church with his family.

Random Word

dove-tail

DOVE-TAIL, n. In carpentry, the manner of fastening boards and timbers together by letting one piece into another in the form of a doves tail spread, or wedge reversed, so that it cannot be drawn out. This is the strongest of all the fastenings or jointings.

DOVE-TAIL, v.t. To unite by a tenon in form of a pigeons tail spread, let into a board or timber.

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