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Tuesday - October 4, 2022

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [full]

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full

FULL, a.

1. Replete; having within its limits all that it can contain; as a vessel full of liquor.

2. Abounding with; having a large quantity or abundance; as a house full of furniture; life is full of cares and perplexities.

3. Supplied; not vacant.

Had the throne been full, their meeting would not have been regular.

4. Plump; fat; as a full body.

5. Saturated; sated.

I am full of the burnt offerings of rams. Is. 1.

6. Crowded, with regard to the imagination or memory.

Every one is full of the miracles done by cold baths on decayed and weak constitutions.

7. Large; entire; not partial; that fills; as a full meal.

8. Complete; entire; not defective or partial; as the full accomplishment of a prophecy.

9. Complete; entire; without abatement.

It came to pass, at the end of two full years, that Pharoah dreamed - Gen 41.

10. Containing the whole matter; expressing the whole; as a full narration or description.

11. Strong; not faint or attenuated; loud; clear; distinct; as a full voice or sound.

12. Mature; perfect; as a person of full age.

13. Entire; complete; denoting the completion of a sentence; as a full stop or point.

14. Spread to view in all dimensions; as a head drawn with a full face.

15. Exhibiting the whole disk or surface illuminated; as the full moon.

16. Abundant; plenteous; sufficient. We have a full supply of provisions for the year.

17. Adequate; equal; as a full compensation or reward for labor.

18. Well fed.

19. Well supplied or furnished; abounding.

20. Copious; ample. The speaker or the writer was full upon that point.

A full band, in music, is when all the voices and instruments are employed.

A full organ, is when all or most of the stops are out.

FULL, n.

1. Complete measure; utmost extent. this instrument answers to the full.

2. The highest state or degree.

The swan's down feather, that stands upon the swell at full of tide -

3. The whole; the total; in the phrase, at full.

4. The state of satiety; as fed to the full.

The full of the moon, is the time when it presents to the spectator its whole face illuminated, as it always does when in opposition to the sun.

FULL, adv.

1. Quite; to the same degree; without abatement or diminution.

The pawn I proffer shall be full as good.

2. With the whole effect.

The diapason closing full in man.

3. Exactly.

Full in the center of the sacred wood.

4. Directly; as, he looked him full in the face.

It is placed before adjectives and adverbs to heighten or strengthen their signification; as full sad.

Full well ye reject the commandment of God, that ye may keep your own tradition. Mark 7.

Full is prefixed to other words, chiefly participles, to express utmost extent or degree.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [full]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

FULL, a.

1. Replete; having within its limits all that it can contain; as a vessel full of liquor.

2. Abounding with; having a large quantity or abundance; as a house full of furniture; life is full of cares and perplexities.

3. Supplied; not vacant.

Had the throne been full, their meeting would not have been regular.

4. Plump; fat; as a full body.

5. Saturated; sated.

I am full of the burnt offerings of rams. Is. 1.

6. Crowded, with regard to the imagination or memory.

Every one is full of the miracles done by cold baths on decayed and weak constitutions.

7. Large; entire; not partial; that fills; as a full meal.

8. Complete; entire; not defective or partial; as the full accomplishment of a prophecy.

9. Complete; entire; without abatement.

It came to pass, at the end of two full years, that Pharoah dreamed - Gen 41.

10. Containing the whole matter; expressing the whole; as a full narration or description.

11. Strong; not faint or attenuated; loud; clear; distinct; as a full voice or sound.

12. Mature; perfect; as a person of full age.

13. Entire; complete; denoting the completion of a sentence; as a full stop or point.

14. Spread to view in all dimensions; as a head drawn with a full face.

15. Exhibiting the whole disk or surface illuminated; as the full moon.

16. Abundant; plenteous; sufficient. We have a full supply of provisions for the year.

17. Adequate; equal; as a full compensation or reward for labor.

18. Well fed.

19. Well supplied or furnished; abounding.

20. Copious; ample. The speaker or the writer was full upon that point.

A full band, in music, is when all the voices and instruments are employed.

A full organ, is when all or most of the stops are out.

FULL, n.

1. Complete measure; utmost extent. this instrument answers to the full.

2. The highest state or degree.

The swan's down feather, that stands upon the swell at full of tide -

3. The whole; the total; in the phrase, at full.

4. The state of satiety; as fed to the full.

The full of the moon, is the time when it presents to the spectator its whole face illuminated, as it always does when in opposition to the sun.

FULL, adv.

1. Quite; to the same degree; without abatement or diminution.

The pawn I proffer shall be full as good.

2. With the whole effect.

The diapason closing full in man.

3. Exactly.

Full in the center of the sacred wood.

4. Directly; as, he looked him full in the face.

It is placed before adjectives and adverbs to heighten or strengthen their signification; as full sad.

Full well ye reject the commandment of God, that ye may keep your own tradition. Mark 7.

Full is prefixed to other words, chiefly participles, to express utmost extent or degree.

FULL, a. [Sax. full; Sw. full; G. voll; D. vol; Goth. fulds; Dan. fuld; W. gwala, fullness. Qu. It. vole, in composition. See Fill and to full.]

  1. Replete; having within its limits all that it can contain; as, a vessel full of liquor.
  2. Abounding with; having a large quantity or abundance; as, a house full of furniture; life is full of cares and perplexities.
  3. Supplied; not vacant. Had the throne been full, their meeting would not have been regular. Blackstone.
  4. Plump; fat; as, a full body.
  5. Saturated; sated. l am full of the burnt offerings of rams. Is. i.
  6. Crowded, with regard to the imagination or memory. Every one is full of the miracles done by cold baths on decayed and week constitutions. Locke.
  7. Large; entire; not partial; that fills; as, a full meal.
  8. Complete entire; not defective or partial; as, the full accomplishment of a prophecy.
  9. Complete; entire; without abatement. It came to pass at the end of two full years, that Pharoah dreamed. Gen. xli.
  10. Containing the whole matter; expressing the whole; as, a full narration or description.
  11. Strong; not faint or attenuated; loud; clear; distinct; as, a full voice or sound.
  12. Mature; perfect; as, a person of full age.
  13. Entire; complete; denoting the completion of a sentence; as, a full stop or point.
  14. Spread to view in all dimensions; as, a head drawn with a full face. Addison.
  15. Exhibiting the whole disk or surface illuminated; as, the full moon.
  16. Abundant; plenteous; sufficient. We have a full supply of provisions for the year.
  17. Adequate; equal; as, a full compensation or reward for labor.
  18. Well fed.
  19. Well supplied or furnished; abounding.
  20. Copious; ample. The speaker or the writer was full upon that point. Milford. A full band, in music, is when all the voices and instruments are employed. A full organ, is when all or most of the stops are out.

FULL, adv.

  1. Quite; to the same degree; without abatement or diminution. The pawn I proffer shall be full as good. Dryden.
  2. With the whole effect. The diapason closing full in man. Dryden.
  3. Exactly. Full in the center of the sacred wood. Addison.
  4. Directly; as, he looked him full in the face. It is placed before adjectives and adverbs to highten or strengthen their signification; as, full sad. Milton. Full well ye reject the commandment of God, that ye may keep your own tradition. Mark vii. Full is prefixed to other words, chiefly participles, to express utmost extent or degree.

FULL, n.

  1. Complete measure; utmost extent. This instrument answers to the full.
  2. The highest state or degree. The swan's down feather, / That steeds upon the swell at full of tide. Shak.
  3. The whole; the total; in the phrase, at full. Shak.
  4. The state of satiety; as, fed to the full. The full of the moon, is the time when it presents to the spectator its whole face illuminated, as it always does when in opposition to the sun.

FULL, v.t. [Sax. fullian; L. fullo; D. vollen, vullen; Fr. fouler; to tread, to press, to full; foule, a crowd; It. folla, and folta, a crowd; folto, dense; allied to Eng. felt, filter, It. feltro, from being thick or fulled. Sax. feala, many, Gr. πολλοι, that is, a crowd, a throng. Foul and defile are probably of the same family. As the French fouler signifies to tread and to full cloth, so walker, a fuller, is from the root of walk.]

To thicken cloth in a mill. This is the primary sense; but in practice, to full is to mill; to make compact; or to scour, cleanse and thicken in a mill.


Full
  1. Filled up, having within its limits all that it can contain; supplied; not empty or vacant; -- said primarily of hollow vessels, and hence of anything else; as, a cup full of water; a house full of people.

    Had the throne been full, their meeting would not have been regular. Blackstone.

  2. Complete measure; utmost extent; the highest state or degree.

    The swan's-down feather,
    That stands upon the swell at full of tide.
    Shak.

    Full of the moon, the time of full moon.

  3. Quite; to the same degree; without abatement or diminution; with the whole force or effect; thoroughly; completely; exactly; entirely.

    The pawn I proffer shall be full as good. Dryden.

    The diapason closing full in man. Dryden.

    Full in the center of the sacred wood. Addison.

    * Full is placed before adjectives and adverbs to heighten or strengthen their signification. "Full sad." Milton. "Master of a full poor cell." Shak. "Full many a gem of purest ray serene." T. Gray.

    Full is also prefixed to participles to express utmost extent or degree; as, full-bloomed, full-blown, full-crammed full-grown, full-laden, full-stuffed, etc. Such compounds, for the most part, are self-defining.

  4. To become full or wholly illuminated; as, the moon fulls at midnight.
  5. To thicken by moistening, heating, and pressing, as cloth; to mill; to make compact; to scour, cleanse, and thicken in a mill.
  6. To become fulled or thickened; as, this material fulls well.
  7. Abundantly furnished or provided; sufficient in quantity, quality, or degree; copious; plenteous; ample; adequate; as, a full meal; a full supply; a full voice; a full compensation; a house full of furniture.
  8. Not wanting in any essential quality; complete; entire; perfect; adequate; as, a full narrative; a person of full age; a full stop; a full face; the full moon.

    It came to pass, at the end of two full years, that Pharaoh
    dreamed.
    Gen. xii. 1.

    The man commands
    Like a full soldier.
    Shak.

    I can not
    Request a fuller satisfaction
    Than you have freely granted.
    Ford.

  9. Sated; surfeited.

    I am full of the burnt offerings of rams. Is. i. 11.

  10. Having the mind filled with ideas; stocked with knowledge; stored with information.

    Reading maketh a full man. Bacon.

  11. Having the attention, thoughts, etc., absorbed in any matter, and the feelings more or less excited by it, as, to be full of some project.

    Every one is full of the miracles done by cold baths on decayed and weak constitutions. Locke.

  12. Filled with emotions.

    The heart is so full that a drop overfills it. Lowell.

  13. Impregnated; made pregnant.

    [Obs.]

    Ilia, the fair, . . . full of Mars. Dryden.

    At full, when full or complete. Shak. -- Full age (Law) the age at which one attains full personal rights; majority; -- in England and the United States the age of 21 years. Abbott. -- Full and by (Naut.), sailing closehauled, having all the sails full, and lying as near the wind as poesible. -- Full band (Mus.), a band in which all the instruments are employed. -- Full binding, the binding of a book when made wholly of leather, as distinguished from half binding. -- Full bottom, a kind of wig full and large at the bottom. -- Full brother or sister, a brother or sister having the same parents as another. -- Full cry (Hunting), eager chase; -- said of hounds that have caught the scent, and give tongue together. -- Full dress, the dress prescribed by authority or by etiquette to be worn on occasions of ceremony. -- Full hand (Poker), three of a kind and a pair. -- Full moon. (a) The moon with its whole disk illuminated, as when opposite to the sun. (b) The time when the moon is full. -- Full organ (Mus.), the organ when all or most stops are out. -- Full score (Mus.), a score in which all the parts for voices and instruments are given. -- Full sea, high water. -- Full swing, free course; unrestrained liberty; "Leaving corrupt nature to . . . the full swing and freedom of its own extravagant actings." South (Colloq.) -- In full, at length; uncontracted; unabridged; written out in words, and not indicated by figures. -- In full blast. See under Blast.

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Full

FULL, adjective

1. Replete; having within its limits all that it can contain; as a vessel full of liquor.

2. Abounding with; having a large quantity or abundance; as a house full of furniture; life is full of cares and perplexities.

3. Supplied; not vacant.

Had the throne been full their meeting would not have been regular.

4. Plump; fat; as a full body.

5. Saturated; sated.

I am full of the burnt offerings of rams. Isaiah 1:11.

6. Crowded, with regard to the imagination or memory.

Every one is full of the miracles done by cold baths on decayed and weak constitutions.

7. Large; entire; not partial; that fills; as a full meal.

8. Complete; entire; not defective or partial; as the full accomplishment of a prophecy.

9. Complete; entire; without abatement.

It came to pass, at the end of two full years, that Pharoah dreamed - Genesis 41:1.

10. Containing the whole matter; expressing the whole; as a full narration or description.

11. Strong; not faint or attenuated; loud; clear; distinct; as a full voice or sound.

12. Mature; perfect; as a person of full age.

13. Entire; complete; denoting the completion of a sentence; as a full stop or point.

14. Spread to view in all dimensions; as a head drawn with a full face.

15. Exhibiting the whole disk or surface illuminated; as the full moon.

16. Abundant; plenteous; sufficient. We have a full supply of provisions for the year.

17. Adequate; equal; as a full compensation or reward for labor.

18. Well fed.

19. Well supplied or furnished; abounding.

20. Copious; ample. The speaker or the writer was full upon that point.

A full band, in music, is when all the voices and instruments are employed.

A full organ, is when all or most of the stops are out.

FULL, noun

1. Complete measure; utmost extent. this instrument answers to the full

2. The highest state or degree.

The swan's down feather, that stands upon the swell at full of tide -

3. The whole; the total; in the phrase, at full

4. The state of satiety; as fed to the full

The full of the moon, is the time when it presents to the spectator its whole face illuminated, as it always does when in opposition to the sun.

FULL, adverb

1. Quite; to the same degree; without abatement or diminution.

The pawn I proffer shall be full as good.

2. With the whole effect.

The diapason closing full in man.

3. Exactly.

FULL in the center of the sacred wood.

4. Directly; as, he looked him full in the face.

It is placed before adjectives and adverbs to heighten or strengthen their signification; as full sad.

FULL well ye reject the commandment of God, that ye may keep your own tradition. Mark 7:9.

FULL is prefixed to other words, chiefly participles, to express utmost extent or degree.

Why 1828?

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The 1828 Webster's will help in my study of the Bible and reveal the more original and Biblical meanings of the words.

— Loriann (Surrey, BC)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

freechapel

FREECHAP'EL, n. In England, a chapel founded by the king and not subject to the jurisdiction of the ordinary. The kind may also grant license to a subject to found such a chapel.

Free city, in Germany, an imperial city, not subject to a prince, but governed by its own magistrates.

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