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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [frame]

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frame

FRAME, v.t. [L. armus, Eng. arm.]

1. To fit or prepare and unite several parts in a regular structure or entire thing; to fabricate by orderly construction and union of various parts; as, to frame a house or other building.

2. To fit one thing to another; to adjust; to make suitable.

3. To make; to compose; as, to frame a law.

For thou art framed of the firm truth of valor.

4. To regulate; to adjust; to shape; to conform; as, to frame our lives according to the rules of the gospel.

5. To form and digest by thought; as, to frame ideas in the mind.

How many excellent reasonings are framed in the mind of a man of wisdom and study in a length of years!

6. To contrive; to plan; to devise; as, to frame a project or design.

7. To invent; to fabricate, in a bad sense; as, to frame a story or lie.

FRAME, v.i. To contrive. Judges 12:6.

FRAME, n.

1. The timbers of an edifice fitted and joined in the form proposed, for the purpose of supporting the covering; as the frame of a house, barn, bridge or ship.

2. Any fabric or structure composed of parts united; as the frame of an ox or horse. So we say, the frame of the heavenly arch; the frame of the world.

3. Any kind of case or structure made for admitting, inclosing or supporting things; as the frame of a window, door, picture or looking glass.

4. Among printers, a stand to support the cases in which the types are distributed.

5. Among founders, a kind of ledge, inclosing a board, which being filled with wet sand, serves as a mold for castings.

6. A sort of loom on which linen, silk, &c. is stretched for quilting or embroidering.

7. Order; regularity; adjusted series or composition of parts. We say, a person is out of frame; the mind is not in a good frame.

Your steady soul preserves her frame.

8. Form; scheme; structure; constitution; system; as a frame of government.

9. Contrivance; projection.

John the bastard, whose spirits toil in frame of villainies.

10. Shape; form; proportion.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [frame]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

FRAME, v.t. [L. armus, Eng. arm.]

1. To fit or prepare and unite several parts in a regular structure or entire thing; to fabricate by orderly construction and union of various parts; as, to frame a house or other building.

2. To fit one thing to another; to adjust; to make suitable.

3. To make; to compose; as, to frame a law.

For thou art framed of the firm truth of valor.

4. To regulate; to adjust; to shape; to conform; as, to frame our lives according to the rules of the gospel.

5. To form and digest by thought; as, to frame ideas in the mind.

How many excellent reasonings are framed in the mind of a man of wisdom and study in a length of years!

6. To contrive; to plan; to devise; as, to frame a project or design.

7. To invent; to fabricate, in a bad sense; as, to frame a story or lie.

FRAME, v.i. To contrive. Judges 12:6.

FRAME, n.

1. The timbers of an edifice fitted and joined in the form proposed, for the purpose of supporting the covering; as the frame of a house, barn, bridge or ship.

2. Any fabric or structure composed of parts united; as the frame of an ox or horse. So we say, the frame of the heavenly arch; the frame of the world.

3. Any kind of case or structure made for admitting, inclosing or supporting things; as the frame of a window, door, picture or looking glass.

4. Among printers, a stand to support the cases in which the types are distributed.

5. Among founders, a kind of ledge, inclosing a board, which being filled with wet sand, serves as a mold for castings.

6. A sort of loom on which linen, silk, &c. is stretched for quilting or embroidering.

7. Order; regularity; adjusted series or composition of parts. We say, a person is out of frame; the mind is not in a good frame.

Your steady soul preserves her frame.

8. Form; scheme; structure; constitution; system; as a frame of government.

9. Contrivance; projection.

John the bastard, whose spirits toil in frame of villainies.

10. Shape; form; proportion.

FRAME, n.

  1. The timbers of an edifice fitted and joined in the form proposed, for the purpose of supporting the covering; as, the frame of a house, barn, bridge or ship.
  2. Any fabric or structure composed of parts united; as, the frame of an ox or horse. So we say, the frame of the heavenly arch; the frame of the world. Hooker. Tillotson.
  3. Any kind of case or structure made for admitting, inclosing or supporting things; as, the frame of a window, door picture, or looking glass.
  4. Among printers, a stand to support the cases in which the types are distributed.
  5. Among founders; a kind of ledge, inclosing a board, which being filled with wet sand, serves as a mold for castings. Encyc.
  6. A sort of loom on which linen, silk, &c., is stretched for quilting or embroidering. Encyc.
  7. Order; regularity; adjusted series or composition of parts. We say, a person is out of frame; the mind is not in a good frame. Your steady soul preserves her frame. Swift.
  8. Form; scheme; structure; constitution; system; as, a frame of government.
  9. Contrivance; projection. John the bastard, / Whose spirits toil in frame of villainies. Shak.
  10. Particular state, as of the mind.
  11. Shape; form; proportion. Hudibras. Lace-frame, a frame or machine for making lace. Stocking-frame, a loom or machine for making stockings, with silk, woolen, or cotton thread.

FRAME, v.i.

To contrive. Judges xii. 6.


FRAME, v.t. [Sax. fremman, to frame, to effect or perform; Arm. framma, to join; D. raam, a frame, G. rahm, a frame and cream; Dan. rame; Sw. ram; Russ. rama. Qu. Class Rm, No. 6. In Russ. rama is a frame, and ramo, the shoulder, L. armus, Eng. arm.]

  1. To fit or prepare and unite several parts in a regular structure or entire thing; to fabricate by orderly construction and union of various parts; as, to frame a house or other building.
  2. To fit one thing to another; to adjust; to make suitable. Abbot.
  3. To make; to compose; as, to frame a law. For thou art framed of the firm truth of valor. Shak.
  4. To regulate; to adjust; to shape; to conform; as, to frame our lives according to the rules of the Gospel.
  5. To form and digest by thought; as, to frame ideas in the mind. How many excellent reasonings are framed in the mind of a man of wisdom and study in a length of years! Watts.
  6. To contrive; to plan; to devise; as, to frame a project or design.
  7. To invent; to fabricate; in a bad sense; as, to frame a story or lie.

Frame
  1. To construct by fitting and uniting the several parts of the skeleton of any structure] specifically, in woodwork, to put together by cutting parts of one member to fit parts of another. See Dovetail, Halve, v. t., Miter, Tenon, Tooth, Tusk, Scarf, and Splice.
  2. To shape] to arrange, as the organs of speech.

    [Obs.] Judg. xii. 6.
  3. Anything composed of parts fitted and united together; a fabric; a structure; esp., the constructional system, whether of timber or metal, that gives to a building, vessel, etc., its model and strength; the skeleton of a structure.

    These are thy glorious works, Parent of good,
    Almighty! thine this universal frame.
    Milton.

  4. In games: (a) In pool, the triangular form used in setting up the balls; also, the balls as set up, or the round of playing required to pocket them all; as, to play six frames in a game of 50 points. (b) In bowling, as in tenpins, one of the several innings forming a game.
  5. To originate; to plan; to devise; to contrive; to compose; in a bad sense, to invent or fabricate, as something false.

    How many excellent reasonings are framed in the mind of a man of wisdom and study in a length of years. I. Watts.

  6. To proceed; to go.

    [Obs.]

    The bauty of this sinful dame
    Made many princes thither frame.
    Shak.

  7. The bodily structure; physical constitution; make or build of a person.

    Some bloody passion shakes your very frame. Shak.

    No frames could be strong enough to endure it. Prescott.

  8. To fit to something else, or for some specific end; to adjust; to regulate; to shape; to conform.

    And frame my face to all occasions. Shak.

    We may in some measure frame our minds for the reception of happiness. Landor.

    The human mind is framed to be influenced. I. Taylor.

  9. A kind of open case or structure made for admitting, inclosing, or supporting things, as that which incloses or contains a window, door, picture, etc.; that on which anything is held or stretched

    ; as: (a)
  10. To cause; to bring about; to produce.

    [Obs.]

    Fear frames disorder, and disorder wounds. Shak.

  11. A term applied, especially in England, to certain machines built upon or within framework; as, a stocking frame; lace frame; spinning frame, etc.
  12. To support.

    [Obs. *** R.]

    That on a staff his feeble steps did frame. Spenser.

  13. Form; shape; proportion; scheme; structure; constitution; system; as, a frameof government.

    She that hath a heart of that fine frame
    To pay this debt of love but to a brother.
    Shak.

    Put your discourse into some frame. Shak.

  14. To provide with a frame, as a picture.
  15. Particular state or disposition, as of the mind; humor; temper; mood; as, to be always in a happy frame.
  16. Contrivance; the act of devising or scheming.

    [Obs.]

    John the bastard
    Whose spirits toil in frame of villainies.
    Shak.

    Balloon frame, Cant frames, etc. See under Balloon, Cant, etc. -- Frame building or house, a building of which the form and support is made of framed timbers. [U.S.] -- Frame level, a mason's level. -- Frame saw, a thin saw stretched in a frame to give it rigidity.

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Frame

FRAME, verb transitive [Latin armus, Eng. arm.]

1. To fit or prepare and unite several parts in a regular structure or entire thing; to fabricate by orderly construction and union of various parts; as, to frame a house or other building.

2. To fit one thing to another; to adjust; to make suitable.

3. To make; to compose; as, to frame a law.

For thou art framed of the firm truth of valor.

4. To regulate; to adjust; to shape; to conform; as, to frame our lives according to the rules of the gospel.

5. To form and digest by thought; as, to frame ideas in the mind.

How many excellent reasonings are framed in the mind of a man of wisdom and study in a length of years!

6. To contrive; to plan; to devise; as, to frame a project or design.

7. To invent; to fabricate, in a bad sense; as, to frame a story or lie.

FRAME, verb intransitive To contrive. Judges 12:6.

FRAME, noun

1. The timbers of an edifice fitted and joined in the form proposed, for the purpose of supporting the covering; as the frame of a house, barn, bridge or ship.

2. Any fabric or structure composed of parts united; as the frame of an ox or horse. So we say, the frame of the heavenly arch; the frame of the world.

3. Any kind of case or structure made for admitting, inclosing or supporting things; as the frame of a window, door, picture or looking glass.

4. Among printers, a stand to support the cases in which the types are distributed.

5. Among founders, a kind of ledge, inclosing a board, which being filled with wet sand, serves as a mold for castings.

6. A sort of loom on which linen, silk, etc. is stretched for quilting or embroidering.

7. Order; regularity; adjusted series or composition of parts. We say, a person is out of frame; the mind is not in a good frame

Your steady soul preserves her frame

8. Form; scheme; structure; constitution; system; as a frame of government.

9. Contrivance; projection.

John the bastard, whose spirits toil in frame of villainies.

10. Shape; form; proportion.

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The original meaning of words

— Cheryl (Getzville, NY)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

vilifying

VIL'IFYING, ppr. Debasing; defaming.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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