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Friday - January 17, 2020

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [fox]

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fox

FOX. n.

1. An animal of the genus Canis, with a straight tail, yellowish or straw-colored hair, and erect ears. This animal burrows in the earth, is remarkable for his cunning, and preys on lambs, geese, hens or other small animals.

2. A sly, cunning fellow.

3. In seaman's language, a seizing made by twisting several rope-yarns together.

4. Formerly, a cant expression for a sword.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [fox]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

FOX. n.

1. An animal of the genus Canis, with a straight tail, yellowish or straw-colored hair, and erect ears. This animal burrows in the earth, is remarkable for his cunning, and preys on lambs, geese, hens or other small animals.

2. A sly, cunning fellow.

3. In seaman's language, a seizing made by twisting several rope-yarns together.

4. Formerly, a cant expression for a sword.

FOX, n. [Sax. fox; G. fuchs; D. vos.]

  1. An animal of the genus Canis, with a straight tail, yellowish or straw-colored hair, and erect ears. This animal burrows in the earth, is remarkable for his cunning, and preys on lambs, geese, hens or other small animals.
  2. A sly, cunning fellow.
  3. In seamen's language, a seizing made by twisting several rope-yarns together.
  4. Formerly, a cant expression for a sword. Shak.

FOX, v.t.

To intoxicate; to stupefy. [Not used.] Boyle.


Fox
  1. A carnivorous animal of the genus Vulpes, family Canidæ, of many species. The European fox (V. vulgaris or V. vulpes), the American red fox (V. fulvus), the American gray fox (V. Virginianus), and the arctic, white, or blue, fox (V. lagopus) are well-known species.

    * The black or silver-gray fox is a variety of the American red fox, producing a fur of great value; the cross- gray and woods-gray foxes are other varieties of the same species, of less value. The common foxes of Europe and America are very similar; both are celebrated for their craftiness. They feed on wild birds, poultry, and various small animals.

    Subtle as the fox for prey. Shak.

  2. To intoxicate] to stupefy with drink.

    I drank . . . so much wine that I was almost foxed. Pepys.

  3. To turn sour; -- said of beer, etc., when it sours in fermenting.
  4. The European dragonet.
  5. To make sour, as beer, by causing it to ferment.
  6. The fox shark or thrasher shark; -- called also sea fox. See Thrasher shark, under Shark.
  7. To repair the feet of, as of boots, with new front upper leather, or to piece the upper fronts of.
  8. A sly, cunning fellow.

    [Colloq.]

    We call a crafty and cruel man a fox. Beattie.

  9. Rope yarn twisted together, and rubbed with tar; -- used for seizings or mats.
  10. A sword; -- so called from the stamp of a fox on the blade, or perhaps of a wolf taken for a fox.

    [Obs.]

    Thou diest on point of fox. Shak.

  11. A tribe of Indians which, with the Sacs, formerly occupied the region about Green Bay, Wisconsin; -- called also Outagamies.

    Fox and geese. (a) A boy's game, in which one boy tries to catch others as they run one goal to another. (b) A game with sixteen checkers, or some substitute for them, one of which is called the fox, and the rest the geese; the fox, whose first position is in the middle of the board, endeavors to break through the line of the geese, and the geese to pen up the fox. -- Fox bat (Zoöl.), a large fruit bat of the genus Pteropus, of many species, inhabiting Asia, Africa, and the East Indies, esp. P. medius of India. Some of the species are more than four feet across the outspread wings. See Fruit bat. -- Fox bolt, a bolt having a split end to receive a fox wedge. -- Fox brush (Zoöl.), the tail of a fox. -- Fox evil, a disease in which the hair falls off; alopecy. -- Fox grape (Bot.), the name of two species of American grapes. The northern fox grape (Vitis Labrusca) is the origin of the varieties called Isabella, Concord, Hartford, etc., and the southern fox grape (Vitis vulpina) has produced the Scuppernong, and probably the Catawba. -- Fox hunter. (a) One who pursues foxes with hounds. (b) A horse ridden in a fox chase. -- Fox shark (Zoöl.), the thrasher shark. See Thrasher shark, under Thrasher. -- Fox sleep, pretended sleep. -- Fox sparrow (Zoöl.), a large American sparrow (Passerella iliaca); -- so called on account of its reddish color. -- Fox squirrel (Zoöl.), a large North American squirrel (Sciurus niger, or S. cinereus). In the Southern States the black variety prevails; farther north the fulvous and gray variety, called the cat squirrel, is more common. -- Fox terrier (Zoöl.), one of a peculiar breed of terriers, used in hunting to drive foxes from their holes, and for other purposes. There are rough- and smooth-haired varieties. -- Fox trot, a pace like that which is adopted for a few steps, by a horse, when passing from a walk into a trot, or a trot into a walk. -- Fox wedge (Mach. *** Carpentry), a wedge for expanding the split end of a bolt, cotter, dowel, tenon, or other piece, to fasten the end in a hole or mortise and prevent withdrawal. The wedge abuts on the bottom of the hole and the piece is driven down upon it. Fastening by fox wedges is called foxtail wedging. -- Fox wolf (Zoö]l.), one of several South American wild dogs, belonging to the genus Canis. They have long, bushy tails like a fox.

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Fox

FOX. noun

1. An animal of the genus Canis, with a straight tail, yellowish or straw-colored hair, and erect ears. This animal burrows in the earth, is remarkable for his cunning, and preys on lambs, geese, hens or other small animals.

2. A sly, cunning fellow.

3. In seaman's language, a seizing made by twisting several rope-yarns together.

4. Formerly, a cant expression for a sword.

FOX, verb transitive To intoxicate; to stupify. [Not used.]

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I love the biblical and christian definition and references

— Tresvan (Clayton, NC)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

soothsay

SOOTH'SAY, v.i. [sooth and say.] To foretell; to predict. Acts. 16. [Little used.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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