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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [flower]

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flower

FLOW'ER, n. [L. flos, floris, a flower; floreo, to blossom. See Flourish.]

1. In botany, that part of a plant which contains the organs of fructification, with their coverings. A flower, when complete, consists of a calyx, corol, stamen and pistil; but the essential parts are the anther and stigma, which are sufficient to constitute a flower, either together in hermaphrodite flowers, or separate in male and female flowers.

2. In vulgar acceptation, a blossom or flower is the flower bud of a plant, when the petals are expanded; open petals being considered as the principal thing in constituting a flower. But in botany, the petals are now considered as a finer sort of covering, and not at all necessary to constitute a flower.

3. The early part of life, or rather of manhood; the prime; youthful vigor; youth; as the flower of age or of life.

4. The best or finest part of a thing; the most valuable part. The most active and vigorous part of an army are called the flower of the troops. Young, vigorous and brave men are called the flower of a nation.

5. The finest part; the essence.

The choice and flower of all things profitable the Psalms do more briefly contain.

6. He or that which is most distinguished for any thing valuable. We say, the youth are the flower of the country.

7. The finest part of grain pulverized. In this sense, it is now always written flour, which see.

1. Flowers, in chimistry, fine particles of bodies, especially when raised by fire in sublimation, and adhering to the heads of vessels in the form of a powder or mealy substance; as the flowers of sulphur.

A substance, somewhat similar, formed spontaneously, is called efforescence.

2. In rhetoric, figures and ornaments of discourse or composition.

3. Menstrual discharges.

FLOW'ER, v.i. [from the noun. The corresponding word in L. is floreo.]

1. To blossom; to bloom; to expand the petals, as a plant. In New England peach trees usually flower in April, and apple trees in May.

2. To be in the prime and spring of life; to flourish; to be youthful, fresh and vigorous.

When flowered my youthful spring.

3. To froth; to ferment gently; to mantle, as new beer.

The beer did flower a little.

4. To come as cream from the surface.

FLOW'ER, v.t. To embellish with figures of flowers; to adorn with imitated flowers.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [flower]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

FLOW'ER, n. [L. flos, floris, a flower; floreo, to blossom. See Flourish.]

1. In botany, that part of a plant which contains the organs of fructification, with their coverings. A flower, when complete, consists of a calyx, corol, stamen and pistil; but the essential parts are the anther and stigma, which are sufficient to constitute a flower, either together in hermaphrodite flowers, or separate in male and female flowers.

2. In vulgar acceptation, a blossom or flower is the flower bud of a plant, when the petals are expanded; open petals being considered as the principal thing in constituting a flower. But in botany, the petals are now considered as a finer sort of covering, and not at all necessary to constitute a flower.

3. The early part of life, or rather of manhood; the prime; youthful vigor; youth; as the flower of age or of life.

4. The best or finest part of a thing; the most valuable part. The most active and vigorous part of an army are called the flower of the troops. Young, vigorous and brave men are called the flower of a nation.

5. The finest part; the essence.

The choice and flower of all things profitable the Psalms do more briefly contain.

6. He or that which is most distinguished for any thing valuable. We say, the youth are the flower of the country.

7. The finest part of grain pulverized. In this sense, it is now always written flour, which see.

1. Flowers, in chimistry, fine particles of bodies, especially when raised by fire in sublimation, and adhering to the heads of vessels in the form of a powder or mealy substance; as the flowers of sulphur.

A substance, somewhat similar, formed spontaneously, is called efforescence.

2. In rhetoric, figures and ornaments of discourse or composition.

3. Menstrual discharges.

FLOW'ER, v.i. [from the noun. The corresponding word in L. is floreo.]

1. To blossom; to bloom; to expand the petals, as a plant. In New England peach trees usually flower in April, and apple trees in May.

2. To be in the prime and spring of life; to flourish; to be youthful, fresh and vigorous.

When flowered my youthful spring.

3. To froth; to ferment gently; to mantle, as new beer.

The beer did flower a little.

4. To come as cream from the surface.

FLOW'ER, v.t. To embellish with figures of flowers; to adorn with imitated flowers.


FLOW'ER, n. [Fr. fleur; Sp. flor; It. fiore; Basque, lora; W. flur, bloom; fluraw, to bloom, to be bright; L. flos, floris, a flower; floreo, to blossom. See Flourish.]

  1. In botany, that part of a plant which contains the organs of fructification, with their coverings. A flower, when complete, consists of a calyx, corol, stamen, and pistil; but the essential parts are the anther and pistil, which are sufficient to constitute a flower, either together in hermaphrodite flowers, or separate in male and female flowers. Martyn. Milne.
  2. In vulgar acceptation, a blossom or flower is the flower-bud of a plant, when the petals are expanded; open petals being considered as the principal thing in constituting a flower. But in botany, the petals are now considered as a finer sort of covering, and not at all necessary to constitute a flower. Milne.
  3. The early part of life, or rather of manhood; the prime; youthful vigor; youth; as, the flower of age or of life.
  4. The best or finest part of a thing; the most valuable part. The most active and vigorous part of an army are called the flower of the troops. Young, vigorous and brave men, are called the flower of a nation. Addison.
  5. The finest part; the essence. The choice and flower of all things profitable the Psalms do more briefly contain. Hooker.
  6. He or that which is most distinguished for any thing valuable. We say, the youth are the flower of the country.
  7. The finest part of grain pulverized. In this sense, it is now always written flour, – which see. Flowers, in chimistry, fine particles of bodies, especially when raised by fire in sublimation, and adhering to the heads of vessels in the form of a powder or mealy substance; as, the flowers of sulphur. Encyc. A substance, somewhat similar, formed spontaneously, is called efflorescence. #2. In rhetoric, figures and ornaments of discourse or composition. #3. Menstrual discharges.

FLOW'ER, v.i. [from the noun. The corresponding word in L. is floreo, Fr. fleurir, It. fiorire, Sp. and Port. florecer, W. fluraw.]

  1. To blossom; to bloom; to expand the petals, as a plant. In New England, peach-trees usually flower in April, and apple-trees in May.
  2. To be in the prime and spring of life; to flourish; to be youthful, fresh and vigorous. When flowered my youthful spring. Spenser.
  3. To froth; to ferment gently; to mantle, as new beer. The beer did flower a little. Bacon.
  4. To come as cream from the surface. Milton.

FLOW'ER, v.t.

To embellish with figures of flowers; to adorn with imitated flowers.


Flow"er
  1. In the popular sense, the bloom or blossom of a plant; the showy portion, usually of a different color, shape, and texture from the foliage.
  2. To blossom] to bloom; to expand the petals, as a plant; to produce flowers; as, this plant flowers in June.
  3. To embellish with flowers; to adorn with imitated flowers; as, flowered silk.
  4. That part of a plant destined to produce seed, and hence including one or both of the sexual organs; an organ or combination of the organs of reproduction, whether inclosed by a circle of foliar parts or not. A complete flower consists of two essential parts, the stamens and the pistil, and two floral envelopes, the corolla and callyx. In mosses the flowers consist of a few special leaves surrounding or subtending organs called archegonia. See Blossom, and Corolla.

    * If we examine a common flower, such for instance as a geranium, we shall find that it consists of: First, an outer envelope or calyx, sometimes tubular, sometimes consisting of separate leaves called sepals; secondly, an inner envelope or corolla, which is generally more or less colored, and which, like the calyx, is sometimes tubular, sometimes composed of separate leaves called petals; thirdly, one or more stamens, consisting of a stalk or filament and a head or anther, in which the pollen is produced; and fourthly, a pistil, which is situated in the center of the flower, and consists generally of three principal parts; one or more compartments at the base, each containing one or more seeds; the stalk or style; and the stigma, which in many familiar instances forms a small head, at the top of the style or ovary, and to which the pollen must find its way in order to fertilize the flower. Sir J. Lubbock.

  5. To come into the finest or fairest condition.

    Their lusty and flowering age. Robynson (More's Utopia).

    When flowered my youthful spring. Spenser.

  6. The fairest, freshest, and choicest part of anything; as, the flower of an army, or of a family; the state or time of freshness and bloom; as, the flower of life, that is, youth.

    The choice and flower of all things profitable the Psalms do more briefly contain. Hooker.

    The flower of the chivalry of all Spain. Southey.

    A simple maiden in her flower
    Is worth a hundred coats of arms.
    Tennyson.

  7. To froth; to ferment gently, as new beer.

    That beer did flower a little. Bacon.

  8. Grain pulverized; meal; flour.

    [Obs.]

    The flowers of grains, mixed with water, will make a sort of glue. Arbuthnot.

  9. To come off as flowers by sublimation.

    [Obs.]

    Observations which have flowered off. Milton.

  10. A substance in the form of a powder, especially when condensed from sublimation; as, the flowers of sulphur.
  11. A figure of speech; an ornament of style.
  12. Ornamental type used chiefly for borders around pages, cards, etc.

    W. Savage.
  13. Menstrual discharges.

    Lev. xv. 24.

    Animal flower (Zoöl.) See under Animal. -- Cut flowers, flowers cut from the stalk, as for making a bouquet. -- Flower bed, a plat in a garden for the cultivation of flowers. -- Flower beetle (Zoöl.), any beetle which feeds upon flowers, esp. any one of numerous small species of the genus Meligethes, family Nitidulidæ, some of which are injurious to crops. - - Flower bird (Zoöl.), an Australian bird of the genus Anthornis, allied to the honey eaters. -- Flower bud, an unopened flower. -- Flower clock, an assemblage of flowers which open and close at different hours of the day, thus indicating the time. -- Flower head (Bot.), a compound flower in which all the florets are sessile on their receptacle, as in the case of the daisy. -- Flower pecker (Zoöl.), one of a family (Dicæidæ) of small Indian and Australian birds. They resemble humming birds in habits. -- Flower piece. (a) A table ornament made of cut flowers. (b) (Fine Arts) A picture of flowers. -- Flower stalk (Bot.), the peduncle of a plant, or the stem that supports the flower or fructification.

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Flower

FLOW'ER, noun [Latin flos, floris, a flower; floreo, to blossom. See Flourish.]

1. In botany, that part of a plant which contains the organs of fructification, with their coverings. A flower when complete, consists of a calyx, corol, stamen and pistil; but the essential parts are the anther and stigma, which are sufficient to constitute a flower either together in hermaphrodite flowers, or separate in male and female flowers.

2. In vulgar acceptation, a blossom or flower is the flower bud of a plant, when the petals are expanded; open petals being considered as the principal thing in constituting a flower But in botany, the petals are now considered as a finer sort of covering, and not at all necessary to constitute a flower

3. The early part of life, or rather of manhood; the prime; youthful vigor; youth; as the flower of age or of life.

4. The best or finest part of a thing; the most valuable part. The most active and vigorous part of an army are called the flower of the troops. Young, vigorous and brave men are called the flower of a nation.

5. The finest part; the essence.

The choice and flower of all things profitable the Psalms do more briefly contain.

6. He or that which is most distinguished for any thing valuable. We say, the youth are the flower of the country.

7. The finest part of grain pulverized. In this sense, it is now always written flour, which see.

1. Flowers, in chimistry, fine particles of bodies, especially when raised by fire in sublimation, and adhering to the heads of vessels in the form of a powder or mealy substance; as the flowers of sulphur.

A substance, somewhat similar, formed spontaneously, is called efforescence.

2. In rhetoric, figures and ornaments of discourse or composition.

3. Menstrual discharges.

FLOW'ER, verb intransitive [from the noun. The corresponding word in Latin is floreo.]

1. To blossom; to bloom; to expand the petals, as a plant. In New England peach trees usually flower in April, and apple trees in May.

2. To be in the prime and spring of life; to flourish; to be youthful, fresh and vigorous.

When flowered my youthful spring.

3. To froth; to ferment gently; to mantle, as new beer.

The beer did flower a little.

4. To come as cream from the surface.

FLOW'ER, verb transitive To embellish with figures of flowers; to adorn with imitated flowers.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

congenite

CONGENITE, CONGENITAL, a. [L., born, to beget, to be born.] Of the same birth; born with another; connate; begotten together.

Many conclusions of moral and intellectual truths seem to be congenite with us.

Native or congenital varieties of animals.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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